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"Hvem spiser brødet?"

Translation:Who is eating the bread?

2 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Gary_Kotka

Very difficult to hear the 'et' in 'brødet'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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The t should be silent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gary_Kotka

Yes, it should. Still, I can't even hear the 'e', or even the 'd' for that matter. All I hear is 'brø-ø'. I try/want to hear 'brøde', but I'm failing miserably. =)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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It should sound like brø'e. The 'd' is often silent at the end of a word, even after inflection. So 'brød' is pronounced 'brø'. The second e in 'brødet' a bit unclear here, so I wouldn't worry too much about it, but there should be a slight difference from the 'ø'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gary_Kotka

Ok, thanks for the explanation. I'll keep my ears peeled.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OnkelD
OnkelD
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I truly appreciate your help here, but in listening to this one over and over and over... all I ever hear is brød... no hint of an (e) in there at all. Perhaps it's my hearing, but I did try several times.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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It's there, but these endings are always hard to catch for non-natives. If you're on a mobile device without headphones, that wouldn't help either.

There's an "eh" part at the end of the word, which is where the intonation goes up to make the sentence sound like a question. That's what you're listening for.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/comadrejaweasel
comadrejaweasel
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Why is it like that in norwegian? I mean, the swedish do pronounce it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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It's to make sure we don't sound like Swedes.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arnica5ch

I agree. I only got this one right because I knew that the exercise was about definite forms.

Also, checking this on forvo: http://pt.forvo.com/word/br%C3%B8det/#no vs http://pt.forvo.com/word/br%C3%B8d/#no

Is there a difference? REALLY?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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You're listening to Danish pronunciations.

In Norwegian, there's definitely a difference.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laurens777

What is the verbal distinction between "brød" and "brødet" because i cant hear it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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"brø" vs "brø-eh" with the intonation rising on the last syllable. The 't' is silent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolfgangCorbett

Is the pronunciation of "brødet" intentional here? I can not distinguish it from "brød"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Yes, the pronunciation is quite representative.

If you listen closely, you should be able to hear something like "brø-eh", with the pitch rising on the second syllable.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Antoine330885

I just can't hear the difference between the singular an plural forms of brød. Is it just that in the plural form, you prununce it longer than in the singular form.. n

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReinyDeer
ReinyDeer
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I am sorry, may be this question has already been discussed in previous themes, but still: Is there any diference between present simple and present continuous tenses in Norwegian? Or this sentence can be both translated as "is easting" and "eats" and we should guess its sence by context?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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There is only one present tense in Norwegian, which indeed can translate into either the simple present or the present continuous in English depending on the context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReinyDeer
ReinyDeer
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Tusen Takk :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Bare hyggelig!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EbbaJahn

Would "brød" alone be correct in a short sentence like this?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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It would work as a sentence, but carry a different meaning.

  • "(et) brød" is the indefinite singular form: "(a) bread"
  • "brødet" is the definite singular form: "the bread"

Mark that Norwegian does not use a definite article, such as "the" in English, but rather employs definite suffixes, which are tagged onto the end of the noun's base form:

-et (definite singular, neuter)
-en (definite singular, masculine)
-a (definite singular, feminine)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daiana345828

Why do i have to put ,,the,, in every sentense it doesnt make sense to me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Because the words you're translating are in their definite form.

Norwegian does not use a definite article, such as "the" in English, but rather employs definite suffixes, which are tagged onto the end of the noun's base form:

-et (definite singular, neuter)
-en (definite singular, masculine)
-a (definite singular, feminine)

So "brød" translates to "bread", but "brødet" to "the bread", and so on.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joost238262
Joost238262
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I kind of have trouble hearing the difference between brødet and brød sometimes. Amy tips for this?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoTielman

What's the diference in pronunciation between brød and brødet?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sweetelves

Is brødet suppose to be pronounced exactly like brød, or is there a bit of an e sound that carries on at the end like most other words?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/millicow

It sounds like brød. How do you tell the difference between brød and brødet?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leeloo580008

I can not hear different betwen Brød and Brødet,,,, can anyone ??? Or is there any other way to know which of them should be ?? Sory for my poor English

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Omar.Marcos
Omar.Marcos
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The "et" is not pronounced?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leetong0412
leetong0412
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Written as "brødet" but pronounced as "brød." Please fix.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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The audio is fine. Please read.

1 year ago