"C'est seulement un enfant."

Translation:He is only a child.

January 7, 2013

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/laliga
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would "she is only a child" be the same or be "c'est seulement une enfant(e)"?

January 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/arronhunt

Nope. There is no gender specific for enfant. "C'est seulement une enfant"

January 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/NomisSimon

I said exactly this and was marked wrong.

August 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
Mod
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"She is only a child" = "C'est seulement une enfant". That is why it was marked wrong.

August 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/NomisSimon

Thanks. Forgot that the article is responsible for distinguishing the gender even if the noun spells the same.

August 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealFlenuan
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Exactly… Did you not see the comment you responded to?

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/shopMNemonic

why is it not "il est" or "elle est"?

May 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristaSantos

Because it is a modified noun? I'm not sure. http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500c.htm

June 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/YahiaEssam
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Yes you're right! It's because it 'is' a modified noun.

July 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealFlenuan
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Um… because it doesn't have to be? They're trying to introduce a new way of saying it. I don't see what's so wrong with that.

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Alix90
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What if i translate it as "It's just a child"?

May 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
Mod
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Actually "He's just a child" is accepted.

October 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/justinnichol

how do you say "he is an only child."

June 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
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Well, in a more natural French, it should be either :

  • C'est un enfant unique

or

  • Il est enfant unique (without "un")

"Il est un enfant unique" sounds really weird, just as you say "Il est médecin" (not "il est un médecin") but you say "C'est un médecin" = "He's / It's a doctor"

November 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/colt00

il est un enfant unique. I got it from google translate.

January 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
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GT is crowd-sourced and includes errors too numerous to catalog. http://french.about.com/library/weekly/aa032500.htm

March 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/E.T.s_Son
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Are "seulement" and "uniquement" interchangeable?

January 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/savage_queen01

No because "seulement"= only However, "uniquement"= unique So they both a different meaning and therefore cannot be interchanged Hope this helps

November 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

not really, in French, 'seulement' and 'uniquement' are interchangeable and mean the same thing 'only'

November 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
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they're not always interchangeable !

  • Il y a seulement des haricots rouges (pas de verts) = Il y a uniquement des haricots rouges (pas de verts) = There are only red beans (no green)

  • J'y vais seulement si tu m'accompagnes = J'y vais uniquement si tu m'accompagnes = I'm going only if you go with me

In those examples, it means that's the only thing available or that's the only reason, condition I'd do something.

Whereas "C'est seulement un enfant !" does not mean that it's the only child available, or that's it's a unique child ; it means "only" in the sense of "just", "barely", "not a big deal".

It would be the same in :

  • Don't worry, it's only out of battery, it's not broken = Ne t'inquiète pas, c'est seulement à plat, c'est pas cassé (you wouldn't say "c'est uniquement à plat").

With the child example, you could use both interchangeably in e.g. :

  • Seulement les enfants sont admis ici = Uniquement les enfants sont admis ici = Children only are allowed here
November 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

thanks for clearing it up, cheers!

November 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DeannaBrooks

Shark bait! Ooh ha ha!

February 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/johannfowl
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I heard éléphant and not enfant... Shame on me ><

February 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/hllsen

Whats wrong with "he is just a kid"

August 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexlassaline

he is only a carott

January 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JulianGome163822

"Just" instead of "only".

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Hassan323496

Then if you wanna say she's only a child, how would one say it?

March 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/StarryCarly6

How do you know when to use "c'est" v. "il est"

April 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LeaFLOCUST

IT SHOULD BE "IT IS ONLY A CHILD" YOU ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ RETARDS

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Adranomia
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Don't use that kind of language here.

December 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth870279

''I said, in a whisper, 'a child has done the horrid thing'" Watson to Sherlock Holmes, Sign of the Four

May 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/graydad

I got to choose from three sentences, and was marked wrong for NOT choosing "He is only an child."

July 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/saean

Yes you should have picked 'He is only a child'. It fits <c'est seulement un enfant> because it means he is only young, he is only small, innocent etc.

'He is an only child' does not fit because it means he does not have any siblings . In french this would be <il est un fils unique> etc.

August 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/graydad

No. According to duolingo I should have said "He is only AN child." It is not correct to use "an" preceding a word that begins with a consonant.

August 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Even Duo's minions make typos sometimes. When you see something that is an obvious/unmistakable error, please report it. It will eventually get fixed.

March 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuujen
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Because you can't use an before child. It has to be a child.

August 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/graydad

Yes. I did NOT choose the option "He is only an child" and Duolingo said I should have.

August 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuujen
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Oh sorry, I misread.

August 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/savage_queen01

It did that to me when i choose bœuf instead of boeuf

November 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tetsun
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Do you really link over from the t of seulement to the u of un enfant when you pronounce this sentence? I wouldn't...

January 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
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Absolutely not, in any case not in common, everyday language.

January 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/BaconBaconBird

Why is "it's only one child" not accepted?

June 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
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The stress would be on the "un" in the sentence :

  • C'est seulement un enfant.

In both English and French, I can only imagine that sentence being said to be accurate about a number of, say, participants to an activity, or children allowed per bedroom or whatever:

  • Hey, tu as écrit "deux enfants", mais c'est seulement un enfant [qu'il faut indiquer] = Hey, you wrote "two children", but it is only one child [that you need to write down]

In what you suggest, the main information is about the number "one / un", and to show we're not just saying "a child" but indeed "one child", we'd certainly insist on "un" in French, and probably in English too.

If you listen to the the sentence again, the stress is slightly more on "seulement" (well, French is quite poor in intonation, the tone is flat; but by default, the focus is on the adverb, here "seulement").

June 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Platten

Related article on rythms and stresses in French...

http://french.about.com/od/pronunciation/a/rhythm.htm

June 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/castoraf

enfant is not an infant?

July 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
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"Infant" is "nourrisson" or "enfant en bas âge" (word per word: "child of low age").

"Enfant" is the general word for kids up to, say, 12 or 13 years old; but also for children whatever their age.

So a 45 year-old man is still l'enfant de ses parents (the child of his parents).

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

It's an interesting point that "infant" used to be more broadly used in English, too. When I was young (admittedly some time ago), travelling with my parents, I was bemused to learn that in Australia (and, I gather, in other British-speaking lands), a school for children up to about age 7 was an "infant school". Dickens also refers to young children as "infants."

It's even more interesting that the Latin word from which both "infant" and "enfant" derive, "infans", means "unable to speak," or "speechless".

So it seems that the original word was more narrow in meaning, then broadened out, and then, in English, narrowed down again.

July 28, 2015
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