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  5. "Inniu, anocht agus amárach."

"Inniu, anocht agus amárach."

Translation:Today, tonight and tomorrow.

October 30, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntAlbanach

Does this sound like 'inniubh' to anyone? I'm just checking it's not my listening.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

That's how it's pronounced in several dialects. So maybe the speaker actually got something right for a change.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Listen to the Munster pronunciations here and here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

I'm assuming the similarities between anocht and e.g. English night, German Nacht etc. are coincidental?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The -nocht part of anocht, “night”, and Nacht likely go back to a common Proto-Indo-European source, as do Dutch and Frisian nacht, Swedish and Norwegian natt, Danish nat, French nuit, Portuguese noite, Spanish noche, Italian notte, Latin nox, Russian ночь, Polish noc, Lithuanian naktis, Greek νύχτα, Ancient Greek νύξ, Sanskrit नक्ति, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That went way longer back than I'd expected - I knew there were common roots for the Germanic languages, but not about the PIE source. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

Where'd the V sound in inniu come from?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Inniu, which came from indiu (i.e. from the dative of dia ; dative plurals used to end in -bh), has had multiple forms since Old Irish; some of them were aniubh, aníbh, and andiumh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

galaxyrocker wrote about that above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

That answers the question of "where is it used?", not where it came from in the sense of "why is it there in the first place?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yeah, that's virtually always what people mean in these forums when they write a question like that. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

Well, thanks for the info. c:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SinadCorny

Inniú is spelt with a fada over the u.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1283

It may be a dialect variation - there was an Irish language newspaper called "Inniú" some years back, and I have heard people pronounce "inniu" with a "ú" sound.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inni%C3%BA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Sounds reasonable. Thanks for the extra info! I'm very far from any kind of fluency in Irish, so I can only contradict the most obvious part of the claim. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

And again, amáireach is clear.

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