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  5. "Fetteren hennes jobber døgne…

"Fetteren hennes jobber døgnet rundt."

Translation:Her cousin works around the clock.

October 31, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Apparently, we're unable to accept answers with slashes in them, so "24/7" is out of the question.

PS: Please don't downvote legitimate questions. Not only is this section meant for questions, but you're effectively downvoting the informative answers as well. Save your downvotes for spam and misleading statements instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TillySelden

Whats the difference between arbeider and jobber?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Outside of fixed expressions they're interchangeable, but there are preferences based on dialect.

It also seems that the younger generation has a preference for "jobber", which is the younger verb as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrBallon

arbeiten auf deutsch. Arbeta på svenska


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fuuuuurkan

What does 'around the clock' mean? Im not native english speaker. Could someone explain it to me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grinsekotze

The whole day, from midnight to midnight.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

Not necessarily from midnight to midnight!

It's a colloquial expression that means they work a lot, maybe for long stretches of time, maybe during the night as well as the day. Or it could be someone on call, like a doctor, who could be working at any time of day or night, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ra272785

You know the 'Rock Around The Clock'. Bill Haley & His Comets. It was helping me to understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Huguenot7

Would it be permissible to say "Her cousin works the whole day 'round"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyytcp

No, in English that's a bit of a nonsense phrase. "Her cousin works the whole day through" is a proper sentence, but a slightly uncommon one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/odi_et_amo

"the whole day round" or "all day round/long" sounds perfectly fine to me. Those might be more common in some regions, but I wouldn't consider them limited to particular dialects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annaa52

Agreed kyytcp. I've read and heard "the whole day through" in pre-20th-century literature and folk songs, but never "the whole day round," even in the US south, which has a lot of peculiar idioms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_World

'Her cousin works all hours', is no good?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McColl34

That translates more to "Fetteren hennes jobber (til) alle døgnets tider." I just made the same mistake, so I went back and looked in my notes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Craig927918

What would the direct translation of this sentence be?

Is it : Her cousin works the day around


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ycUvuSap

Er "...all through the day." ok?

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