"Mein Mann ist Türke."

Translation:My husband is a Turk.

October 31, 2015

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batebyes

what's with Duo and Turks? what about Spaniards and Britons and Indians?

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZL321

There are more Turks than those others you listed in Germany.

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bolecdo

So what? Turks are not the only people learning German and even if they were, it's a fair question since there are a lot of examples that mention Turks.

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ryannichols7

it's not so much who's learning German as there is an extremely high amount of Turkish people in Germany. Berlin is the largest Turkish city outside of Turkey. think of it as Mexican citizens moving to America. you don't see Spanish or Indian people living in Germany the way Turkish do. British do though (especially in Berlin and Hamburg), I will give you that!

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bolecdo

Its really irrelevant that examples mostly, if not exclusively, include Turks. I don't feel offended or left out. But if we are discussing it, it's my opinion that there is no reason to include them so often. Same goes in case if English lessons only contain Mexicans. It's just odd.

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loykalina

As we learn a foreign language, we also learn the culture of that particular language. Since the Turks are the most crowded group in Germany and both cultures are affexted by each other, it is normal that most examples related to nationalities are about the Turks. You'll notice the same about Mexicans and Indians for English.

Moreover, duolingo just teaches you the rule and expect you to take a responsibility to learn the rest. You cannot expect them to teach you every rule and every word. That would be unfair. All you need to do is to do some research online if you do not have any books and use this application as an aid, not as the main source.

August 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaconChomper

Agreed, it would be nice to get some practice referring to people of other countries since German changes the forms so much.

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarefo
Mod
  • 1030

Once we get the chance to make a new version of this course, we'll be happy to do so! For this version, there were just other, more pressing priorities.

March 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darrenmcross

I'd say that the expression "my man" is used in English: why isn't "My man is Turkish" accepted?

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leilani238

It theoretically can, but if somebody says "mein Mann" they pretty much always mean husband (I asked my sister, who is a German-English translator about this, and that's what she said).

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zacwill

Yes, but 'my man' is likewise used in English to mean 'my husband'.

May 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leilani238

German doesn't have a separate word for "husband", though (at least not one in common usage).

May 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darrenmcross

Yeah, the level of commitment in "my man" isn't clear, but I would say the context in which someone would refer to their "man" usually doesn't require that level of detail, but thanks for asking your sister.

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leilani238

This actually came up in convo a while ago - from the same convo: freund(in) means friend, but if you say "mein freund(in)", you pretty much always mean boyfriend/girlfriend. If you want to say "friend" with the English meaning, you'd say "ein(e) freund(in) von mir" - a friend of mine. Odd that both boyfriend/girlfriend and husband have this ambiguity (where English does not). Frau does translate to wife (according to leo.de), but I don't know if it suffers from quite the same ambiguity (this one didn't come up that I recall).

December 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darrenmcross

I guess German has the same problem English does when talking about a long-standing boyfriend/girlfriend: not married, but more committed than the grade-school level connotation that boyfriend/girlfriend seems to have. I myself don't place too much importance on knowing whether someone is married or not, but I do find it interesting how different languages deal with the concept of marriage.

December 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DawsonDarl

So...do germans get confused when we in America say something like "Alright! My man!" :)

December 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebrisHauler

Is there a reason its Türke instead of Türker? Is Türkisch a word like in -> Türkisches Essen?

April 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    German generally refers to people's nationalities with a noun ("a Turk"), as opposed to English which more commonly uses an adjective ("Turkish"). That's just a difference we need to remember to sound natural when speaking German.

    As an adjective, türkisch does also exist. It's lower-case by default (upper-case Türkisch is the language). You could say Ich koche gern türkisches Essen, yes. It usually wouldn't be used to describe people unless you want to emphasise that their character and qualities are "Turkish", rather than their nationality as such.

    July 28, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aghaaslam

    Why Can't i say “ mein Mann ist Türke“ why do i need to use “a“

    November 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      In German, Mein Mann ist Türke is correct. What's the problem?

      In English, you need to use "a" when you use a noun: "My husband is a Turk". All singular nouns in English need an article.

      July 28, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rodrigoccurvo

      English question: Duolingo said I can't drop the article in "My husband is Turk. Can someone explain why? Can't I say "My friend is Brazillian"?

      January 26, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zacwill

      'Brazilian' can be a noun or an adjective, but 'Turk' is only a noun. The adjective would be 'Turkish'.

      May 8, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/123Jelena123

      There is no ein before Türke

      March 11, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
      Mod

        German doesn't need an article for describing someone's nationality or profession, unlike English.

        July 28, 2017

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthiusDiaz

        Can you say 'Turkish'?

        June 24, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse.Jones

        Do you actually every use Ehemann or Ehefrau?

        December 2, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
        Mod

          Yes, in more formal contexts or when it's especially important to make that distinction clear.

          July 28, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerDieDasGuessr

          Would a native speaker help me out? Is Kennedy's famous "Ich bin ein Berliner" incorrect grammar or are there instances where it would be used correctly. I have heard it means "I am a Berliner in spirit" rather than native born. I would very much like to know what is correct.

          June 8, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaorioM

          Why “ist Türke" is translated into "is a Turk"? I checked the dictionary, "Turke" is a noun, why there is no article before Turke?

          December 23, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rphdrgn85

          so, to recap... the husband is turkish, the wife is from india, they have a neighbor that is also turkish, they have pet cats that can read the newspaper and a pet bear that likes to wear dresses. i'm starting to think my life will be more interesting if i move to Germany

          April 2, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarefo
          Mod
          • 1030

          What's weird about people of Turkish/Indian origin living in Germany, or marrying? Yes, Germany has a moderate amount (c. 20%) of people whose ancestors have not lived in Germany for hundreds of years. When I went to primary school, about half of the other pupils where Turkish.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Germany#Ethnic_minorities_and_migrant_background_(Migrationshintergrund)

          So yeah, not consisting solely of stereotypical sausage-eating, leather pants wearing blond guys does indeed make the country more interesting, so please do move there if you enjoy that :) But you might be disappointed about our cats and bears, they are sometimes a bit shy to show off their special interests to foreigners.

          April 3, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malvinalynn

          The choices in the word bank do not include the word "Turk." I switched to "use the keyboard" for this question.

          June 12, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon881278

          Why doesnt it have an indefinite article? My husband is turk?

          July 1, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annekramer

          I feel that there is a cultural, nuanced difference to the English translation answer here "a Turk" verus "Turkish" that may not exist in German and that Duo be deliberate when using the bubble style answers for English, accordingly.

          July 11, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_Dugong

          Should I report a mistake if it doesn't accept "My hubby is Turkish"?

          April 25, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
          Mod

            No, slang words are generally not accepted as a rule because it would greatly complicate the number of possible answers and possibly confuse learners.

            July 28, 2017
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