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"El tercer grado"

Translation:The third grade

4 years ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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I would think a good translation would be "the third degree."

Also, I was wondering if "el tercer grado" has the same idiomatic meaning as "the third degree" in English.

"To give someone the third degree" in English means to subject someone to a long and harsh questioning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guillembb
guillembb
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You are right, in Spanish we say "hacer a alguien un tercer grado" too. The questioning does not need to be harsh, though, it can be just thorough.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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Gracias, guillembb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Genie201

Thank-you! I was also curious about that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/railrule
railrule
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it seems me that "hacer a alguien un tercer grado" is an anglicism. A native speaker.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I would assume it was an anglicism or americanism. But I would expect it would be Él tercer grado. We don't give anyone a third degree. We give them THE third degree.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D.EstherNJ

Like a third-degree burn?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Grado can be used for many of the things that we use either grade or degree for, including burns.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Grado%20

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ITalkTheGoodest

I don't think a third degree burn is what they're talking about, but it's the closest phrase I know to what they are talking about.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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My initial assumption when I read this was third grade as in school, which is a valid use. I actually also thought about the third degree as in "giving someone the third degree" or interrogating them. I don't know whether that expression is meaningful in Spanish, although I wouldn't be surprised if it was at least imported from American movies

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeman2003
Joeman2003
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My level of spanish...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2_Learn_Spanish

LOL, me too. ;)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Please note that grado is also used for degree. The local community college always advertises en español its grado asociado [associate's degree].

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ITalkTheGoodest

Hehe. Just finished my third year of it, does that count?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mick101834

Wouldn't take "the third level"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewVickers1

That's because the Duolingo topic is about education, therefore it in staid of being level, it is grade, due to the context...

But yes, it could mean level, grade, degree, etc...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ITalkTheGoodest

Nice answer.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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Yes, I have the same question, since previous sentences in this unit translated grado as level. What's up?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomas.Janik
Tomas.Janik
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I second.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

so in spanish how would one make the distinction when trying to tell someone "the third grade" verses "the third degree", since both can be said "el tercer grado"? I am assuming it would be context based on other parts of the sentence, or in response to a question like "...me hijo es en el tercer grado", vs "dimos al sospechoso el tercer grado".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guillembb
guillembb
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Definitely, the context is difficult to mistake in this case.

In your son's example, though, the correct verb is "está" as it's a non essential, temporary circumstance: next year he will be in the fourth. If you prefer, a verb exists specially for grades, courses and levels: "cursar".

For the prisoner, I guess a number of different verbs can be used, such as "aplicar" (employ on) or "someter a" (subject).

And, of course, the metaphoric sense is also (maybe more?) used: "Mis amigos me hicieron un tercer grado acerca de mi nueva pareja" (my friends gave me a third degree about my new partner).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anneliseped

In general conversation, I would say 'grade 3' for the third grade of elementary school. Would Duolingo accept that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bonnie860
Bonnie860
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I doubt it. Tercer means third.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Just out of curiosity are you from the UK? In my American East Coast/West Coast experience in general conversation no kid or family member would say Grade 3 as He is in Grade 3. It would be He is in the 3rd Grade. Teachers and school adminstrators often do however, as they tend to think of things that way (the grade three curricum or test scores for grades 1-5.) But I know these things can be regional here let alone the differences between the US and the UK.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eehoepp

In Canada we also say "Grade three".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ITalkTheGoodest

Makes sense, since in Canada there's more British influence. (No offence intended)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Geoffcoldwell

In the UK we would usually say Year 3. Up to year 6 would be in a primary school, years 7 to 13 in a secondary school sometimes called a high school. Students in years 12 and 13 are more likely to say that they are in the 6th form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snatland

And just to be confusing that even varies a bit depending on where in the UK you are. In Northern Ireland we have P1 to P7 in primary school (P being short for primary), then in secondary school we have Year 8 up to Year 14 (which are also sometimes called First Year through to Upper Sixth).

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/themrme1
themrme1
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Why won't it accept "Third grade"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Most of the time Spanish usage of the definite article is the same as English. While colloquial speech in English allows us to say third grade, it is not according to our rule for the use of the definite article which. Is to indicate one grade out of many. Since it is sometimes difficult to learn when the Spanish use is different from the English use, and this colloquial use is not representative of the normal rule, Duo is expecting the "the" in English because it is their in Spanish. For the alternate translation, the third degree, you wouldn't even think of not including the "the"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ITalkTheGoodest

Wow. You seem to know what your talking about. Wow.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karlietheawesome

So this is to explain the grade of something, not like "the third grade" in school?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewVickers1

No, because the Duolingo topic is about education, therefore it in staid of being level, it is grade, due to the context... But yes, it could mean the level, the grade of something, school grade, test grade, degree, etc...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milrecan
milrecan
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could this be tercero grado

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pwhelan161
pwhelan161
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I would also like an answer to this, but I do think it would have to be "grado tercero".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Ordinal numbers preceed the noun they modify except for some special circumstances like the numbers of popes and kings. Primero and tercero lose the o when modifying a masculine singular noun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kirsten637255

Remember, quite a few common adjectives are shortened by dropping the "o" at the end of them when they are placed before masculine singular nouns: primero, tercero, bueno, malo, alguno, uno, culaquiera (in this case, the "a" is dropped), ninguno, and ciento. https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/short-form-adjectives-in-spanish

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KnChari

I think so too, as a novice...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmm703

Would "third grade" (as opposed to "THE third grade") also be a correct translation? I know that, in Spanish, sometimes the "El" does not translate to "The." Por ejemplo, "el domingo" translates simply to "Sunday" and not "the Sunday."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewVickers1

El tercer grado would be 'formally', or 'properly', the third grade, because `( as lynettemcw stated ) most of the time Spanish usage of the definite article is the same as English. While conversational speech in English allows us to say third grade, it is not according to our rule for the use of the definite article which is to indicate one grade out of many. Since it is sometimes difficult to learn when the Spanish use is different from the English use, and this colloquial use is not representative of the normal rule, Duo is expecting the "the" in English because it is the in Spanish. For the alternate translation, the third degree, you wouldn't even think of not including the "the". (me again) Since the Duolingo topic is about education, therefore, it, in staid of being level, it is grade, due to the context... But it could mean the level, grade of something, school grade, test grade, degree, etc...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sihayanami
sihayanami
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In learning Spanish, whether here or elsewhere, I have nearly always had new vocabulary introduced with a word meaning "the" (el/la/los/las) before it, whether we would actually use the word "the" before it in English or not. I suspect they do this to show the word's gender, since that's a lot more important to get right in Spanish. So in translation, the "el" simply disappears when it's an English word that we wouldn't normally stick the word "the" beforehand, such as your example of "Sunday" vs "el domingo."

tl;dr You could try it, though they might mark it wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theRealRabbit

Why is this "el tercer grado", and not "el grado tercer"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthewVickers1

El tercer grado would be 'formally', or 'properly', the third grade, because "el grado tercer" would be "The grade third". Never put the amount, or ordinal number after what you are trying to describe as being the ordinal number of, well, whatever it is.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Exactly. The classes of adjectives that go before the noun are demonstratives and quantifiers. So many of these are heard so often that students don't even think to question them. They include definite and indefinite articles, este, ese, aquel, cada, algún, ningún, y mucho (y mucho más

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/http.kelly

I put "the third grade" and it aid it was wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That has been accepted previously and is in fact the default translation listed. Always report these errors by using the flag emblem. It sometimes is phantom characters that get transmitted over the Internet, but also can occasionally be a programming error that crept in while making a change or adding a translation. The latter is the major reason I recommend to people not to try to have all possible translations accepted, especially when one is the obvious one.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PsychProfBoy
PsychProfBoy
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I fear it's painfully obvious, but I want to ask anyway. This means third grade like "my 9-year-old son is in the third grade," right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That is most probably what was this sentence was chosen for. But grado has some diverse meanings, although most relate to either degree or grade which also have some diverse uses. There is some discussion as to whether they talk about giving someone the third degree in Spanish, but I have no idea about that. But it could conceivable refer to third degree burns or someone getting their third academic degree.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Grado

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adisuissa

does "el tercer grado" only mean third grade (in elementary school), or can it also mean the third grade (of the third exam test i took)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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A grade in school or on a test is nota. But this can also refer to the "third degree", as well as other related terms where grade refers to a level or degree like military ranks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CalvinCust

Por qué "tercer grado" y no "tercero grado". Cuando debo usar tercero y tercer?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Es la misma cosa como uno y un. Antes de un sustantivo masculino, utiliza solo un y tercer. Cuándo el sustantivo no está presente, puede utilizar tercero. No obstante siempre necesita utilizar una o tercera para los sustantivos femeninos.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tammi449302

So could this also mean three degrees like from an university?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think that would be título.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladderdog
ladderdog
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The correction fue lo mismo "the third grade" please fix

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/petermartin6

third grade should be perfectly acceptable

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeckyFell

A native English speaker (me) would say 'I am in third grade'.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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This is obviously a sentence fragment. It doesn't even necessarily apply to school. Grado can refer to various type of grades, degrees, ranks etc. Interesting enough, the only term which is normally just preceeded with the is the expression the third degree, as in to give someone the third degree. However I have no idea if that expression translates.

6 months ago