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https://www.duolingo.com/frenchlearner_21

Learning strategy help?

Hi all,

I want to learn French, and so I've recently started Duolingo. However, I am clueless as to how to proceed, such as what I should do here, how much time should I do them? Also, I understand Duolingo is not the only resource I should do to learn a new language, since it lacks spoken conversational abilities What else should I do?

I need a detailed plan as to how to proceed. I have no prior background knowledge in the language, plus I don't currently reside in a French speaking area.

With Duolingo, all I do are the lessons which it provides. Duolingo doesn't really provide a starting basis for basic material such as grammar,conjugations (they do have a list, however), etc. It feels to me as though I'm going nowhere fast if I keep up this pace. So I would like some suggestions as to how to learn the language along with Duolingo.

p.s. free resources only, please

2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/wildfood
wildfood
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  1. First do your Duolingo tree.

  2. Next do the reverse tree (learn English as a French speaker, this way you will have to answer most of the exercises in French instead of in English. The reverse tree will force you to write whole sentences in French and you will learn a lot of French grammar).

  3. Learn French conjugation at Memrise: (you can do this while completing step 1).

http://www.memrise.com/course/131350/easy-french-conjugation/
4. Watch plenty of easy to understand French videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JmcX7o8pEvc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaNqp4FXh-s

Hint: if you are watching with YouTube and you press the "J" key the video will rewind three seconds and you can easily review any problem words or phrases).
5. Keep your trees golden and use timed practice until it becomes unbelievably easy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PennyWhistler
PennyWhistler
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Excellent advice!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchlearner_21

do you really know all of those languages? like can you engage in a real live conversation with a native speaker? that's impressive, and here i am complaining about learning french, how to do it..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rozzie
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Great points

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchlearner_21

how long should i stick with each lesson of the french tree? im saying this because i could just breeze through it and it won't do nothing, i wouldn't learn much. any other useful videos that i could watch to help me learn french? as it stands, i only know less than 50 french words. im still on basics of the french tree

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildfood
wildfood
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I didn't worry about reviewing until I finished the tree, then I went back and made it golden and kept it that way. When regular reviews got too easy I began using timed practice for review. The repetition will take care of planting the words into your brain until they don't fall out again.

First things first: finish the tree!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sibhreach

Have you attempted to learn any other language before French? Have any success?

It really all depends on your learning style. If you find DL working for you (say, instead of a traditional classroom setting), then I'd work out just how much you need the repetitiveness for each lesson to stick.

As you can see - some folks choose to blast through all the lessons and then go back and review/strengthen skills to keep all the circles golden.

I personally can't do that because I won't retain anything with just one or two repeats. I need this sort of stuff pounded into my brain until I can't stand it any more!

Right now, I've been reviewing my present 2, adject 2, and pronouns (and I'm still going over questions because of the darn syntax!!!) the most, then overall I will make sure I do the main "strengthen skills" which can hit any and all of my lessons that I've completed.

For duration, again, it will depend on your learning style and ability to retain the lessons. I'd say a good average is focus on 1 lesson at a time for an entire week, nail it and keep reviewing, adding to your lessons' review as you can.

You can also do podcasts (try Coffee Break French from the BBC or Learn French with Alexa - both have free podcasts/lessons you can download/read along too, off their websites!)

Bonne chance!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchlearner_21

i tried learning spanish in a classroom setting, in high school for 2 years and one semester in college. safe to say i didnt retain much of that language. but for french i really am interested in learning the language. so am putting in more effort to get help learning

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tessallation

Very helpful - thanks!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michikade

Duo does a great job in my opinion with learning conversational written language and the listening exercises aren't bad. Spoken is not quite as good but if you work at mimicking the sounds you hear through it isn't a bad foundation.

What I personally use right now is Duo for grammar and sentence structure and vocabulary and supplement with Memrise for additional vocabulary. I'm not quite to the point of getting into conversational spoken language but I am getting to where I can read French okay (I'm about 2/3 of the way through the tree as of the time of this writing). Once I finish my tree and the reverse tree, then I'll probably feel somewhat comfortable seeking out spoken practice sources, but that's just me.

2 years ago

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