https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi

No more new languages : Reverse learning first !

  • 22
  • 19
  • 18
  • 10
  • 8

Hey Duolingers !

Even though I'm thrilled by the two new languages added to Duolingo, I have a few concerns about the next moves on Duolingo.

Once all the Beta thing is finished, I would really like the Duolingo team to concentrate on making a reverse learning process for the existing languages before adding new ones.

What I mean by that is :

Why Spanish people should be the only ones to be able to learn English via Duolingo ?

There are several main arguments :

  • English is the language people WANT to learn the most
  • English is the language people NEED to learn the most
  • English is the language necessary to use Duolingo

So please, before adding new languages, consider adding reverse learning, so more and more people will be able to join Duolingo easily,

I'd be glad to know what you guys think about this.

1/7/2013, 12:24:13 PM

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nonstopneil

I agree but feel they should focus on Mandarin and Spanish as English/Mandarin/Spanish are the three most widely spoken and important languages making Spanish/English speakers be able to study Mandarin and Mandarin speakers be able to study Spanish/English would be a huge step.... Compared to focusing on German and Italian, two regional languages

1/7/2013, 4:26:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/panda316
  • 18
  • 6
  • 129

Agreed that English/Mandarin/Spanish are the 3 most spoken languages. But there will be people who like to learn even German & Italian. So let German, Italian also continue.

1/9/2013, 2:13:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Freedom42

Though it's regional, German is a very powerful language around the world. Don't underestimate it's importance because it isn't "popular."

4/16/2013, 4:28:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/shalabajza

I never saw Mandarin as a widely spoken language, but hey, it's not like I know much about Mandarin anyways. As I wrote already, my idea is that Duolingo should get a lot of volunteers to help translate and record new languages, and make the betas more stable. I mean, come on, this thing is completely kick ass /and/ it's free too! So... Why not? I'd be happy to volunteer for Serbian to/from English. And I'm mostly positive a bunch of other people would help out with let's say Mandarin if they even knew about Duolingo and it's awesomness. I guess spreading the word about this is the best we can do for now!

1/8/2013, 6:12:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sednalkram

Mandarin (more correctly "putoong hua" the common language is the northern dialect and the national language that billions of folks living in China learn in school until they run out to the playground to speak their own dialect. Because China has such a large population, "Mandarin" is one of the most spoken languages. Otherwise, middle class Chinese are learning English quite commonly. While one of the most spoke languages, Mandarin is not really useful unless you are headed for mainland China or Taiwan, but it is a lot of fun and I would love to see it here some day. [I did a master's in Oriental Languages at UCB, some Ph'D work at Univ WA Seattle and spent several years in Taiwan].

1/9/2013, 10:37:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/nonstopneil

Mandarin is perfectly correct in English. Would you correct someone for saying Spanish instead of Español? And Mandarin is very useful outside of China, there are over 50 million ethnically Chinese people outside of China (3.5 million in USA). Sure not all of them can speak it but many can, and with more Chinese studying overseas plus immigration these numbers will only increase. Its even making headway into HK and Cantonese speaking areas, which could be a good thing or linguistic imperialism depending on how you see it, but is a fact. Most mid sized cities in North America/Australia/NZ or Europe have people who can speak it.

1/10/2013, 11:23:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Mod
  • 22
  • 19
  • 18
  • 10
  • 8

Hum, there are a lot of French people in London, does that mean that French is a language useful when you come into London ? Not really. Simply because it's not the language used there. Sure, it's going to be useful to speak French if you happen to meet some French people or someone who learned French, but that's all. It's not like you can count on that to be able to make your life in London.

That's an example, but it's the same for Mandarin.

To take USA only, there are about 315 millions people living there. So your 3.5 million people make approximately 1% of the population. Obviously, you won't expect to use Mandarin when going to USA...

My point is : sednalkram is right, Mandarin is not really useful outside China. Doesn't mean it's useless to learn it though.

Maybe it will change after a long time, but for now, even if more people speak Mandarin than English in the world, English is still the most useful language to learn, and except if Occidental world collapses, I don't really see how it's going to change in the near future.

1/10/2013, 11:51:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/coppearlix

It is a fact that many very wealthy Americans put their children into Mandarin classes so that they can grow up and transact business with the Chinese. Of course, Arjofocolovi, foreign languages are not useful if you never have opportunities to use them, and every person has a different goal in learning a language. For those future billionaires and CEOs, Mandarin is by far the best investment. But if you only want to speak one language your whole life, why would you be on duolingo.com anyway?

1/11/2013, 9:46:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/nonstopneil

Okay then what language besides English is useful when not in the region where it is a majority? English in Quebec? Spanish in Barcelona? Italian in Switzerland? Comeon.. I've used Mandarin all over South East Asia and it was very useful, way more so than anything besides English or the native language. If you spoke Mandarin and English and very very bad French you could get a job at Lafayette (example bc you are Parisian), English and French not a chance. For North America knowing Mandarin in San Francisco/NYC/Toronto/Vancouver is far more useful than any European languages besides English and Spanish (in America). There are OVER 5 times as many Chinese outside of China than there are Serbian speakers and nearly as many as there are total Italian speakers....

1/10/2013, 2:19:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Mod
  • 22
  • 19
  • 18
  • 10
  • 8

You're taking exceptions to make a general rule... If it helps you believe, it's fine, whatever works for you. Anyway, most of the time, you will need either to speak English or the official language, not much you or me can do about that.

Well the fact that Mandarin and English were the most useful languages for you in South East Asia is good, and I'm not about to deny that. But I would like to point out that even in China, you can find yourself in trouble with Mandarin, some people still talking other Chinese dialect. But I'm sure you're aware of this.

I don't know where you went in Paris, but you won't see many job offer with "Mandarin" required, except for translators and interpreters. I'm cool with the fact that Mandarin is probably the future, but it's not the present, that's a fact.

So to get a job at Lafayette (or anywhere else with a wide range of direct customer relation), you would rather need very very good French, good English, and anything else is just bonus to push your application.

Once again, I'm not saying Mandarin is useless or will not be useful in the future. But right now, even if it has a lot of speakers, it just doesn't follow the "flows", it's not in comparison with English (yet).

@coppearlix

When did I say I wanted to speak only one language ? Am I not speaking in English right now ? Am I not training on Duolingo ? I don't get what you're saying.

Again, I never said Mandarin was useless, but it's not like it's useful right now. It may be useful in certain situations, and for certain people. But not for a majority of people. But if the majority feels like disagreeing with me please go ahead, maybe I'm wrong ^^.

I'll say Mandarin is useful when you'll need it to get half of the jobs which are proposed to you. I'll say Mandarin is useful when there won't pass a day without you being in contact with Mandarin, whether it's oral or written. I'll say Mandarin is useful when there will be Mandarin expressions melting into my own language. And finally, I'll say Mandarin is useful when I'll know that most of my friends can handle a conversation in Mandarin.

Because right now, English is all that for me, and it's damn useful.

1/12/2013, 12:20:58 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/alice675

Hi, I totally agree with you. First of all every language is important to the people who use it, so this debate is not at all about the importance of the language itself. The question is whether it is useful for a non-native speaker to invest in learning it (if that is the criterion for choosing a language, rather than cultural interest for example). So with respect to Chinese, outside of China, whilst there may be millions of expat Chinese the world over, there are billions of other people speaking other languages, so Chinese is at least not more useful than those languages. Also, I'm assuming that many of the expat Chinese speak the local language as well.

It always makes me laugh, when trying to prove the importance of a language, the number of continents on which the language is spoken is cited, as if Portuguese being spoken in Goa somehow makes it more attractive. Also with respect to economic utility, Japan used to be the number two economic powerhouse of the world, and everyone was going to have to speak it. It rose and waned, and most of the world didn't speak it, and still don't, and just carry on with their lives. Personally, I think that after English, the only language that is truly global is French. After that certain languages have regional usefulness.

4/30/2013, 5:38:48 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kmilo

Totally agree. I am in for it...

1/9/2013, 4:13:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaimepapier
  • 22
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 7
  • 5
  • 45

I was going to recommend this site to my students (who are French) until I realised they wouldn't be able to use it to learn English, which is a great shame because I think some of them would really love it!

1/7/2013, 8:03:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/withdreds
  • 20
  • 14
  • 13

I don't understand why they couldn't use it to learn english? From my understanding it works both ways, in that you learn english to french but it could just as easily work the other way around since both are addressed in the process. The only lacking quality is spoken english but maybe I'm mistaken?

1/8/2013, 8:53:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaimepapier
  • 22
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 7
  • 5
  • 45

You can't learn English by learning French through English. Sure, some of the translations go both ways, but the all important authentic documents only go one way (people are much better at translating into their own language, and you also tend learn more this way). Also, the grammar on the course is geared towards French grammar from an English perspective. English is very different, so you would have to approach it very differently. Not to mention the difference in the way vocabulary overlaps.

To take just one example: 'faire' can be translated two main ways into English – 'to do' and 'to make'. This is easy for us, because we can easily learn that both words end up the same thing. But the other way around, it's much more complicated, especially with this example as there doesn't seem to be a simple logical rule ('make' implies an end product, right? but then how is a bed 'made' and yet cooking 'done'?). French-speakers find this very difficult.

To take the reverse view, Spanish has two words for 'to be' – 'estar' and 'ser' – which poses great problems for English speakers, especially when their nuances become more subtle ('es bueno' verses 'está bueno'). Now if a Spanish-speaker were to use take the course to learn Spanish through English, they would have to put up with constantly tested on their knowledge of the difference between 'estar' and 'ser'... something they already know instinctively. Fortunately for them, the option to learn English through Spanish already exists.

Also, one final point that just occurred to me is that everything written in French is vocalised, whereas nothing written in English is. So learners would not only be missing out on pronunciation and speaking skills, but also on listening.

1/8/2013, 9:19:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jos4success

I'm Dutch learning Spanish via English. The words and sentences aren't too difficult in the beginning. So for me it's not a problem.

Nevertheless I praise the day Duolingo will use DUTCH on their program.

1/14/2013, 11:04:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

I support everything you posted here, Arjofocolovi (+ Jaimepapier). Please let me add a few insights.

The way Duolingo was looks evidences the fact that it was primarily created by and for Americans (English + Spanish).

  • In my 8 month experience here (French learner), I have noticed hundreds of questions dealing with the English language. My assumption is that French, here, is of interest to a huge number of non-Anglophones.

  • The very brand name of this site is meaningful: it is about learning a second language and allow Anglophones to understand Web pages written by foreigners. In reality, it could be called Triolingo (at minimum) since the prerequisite is that a vast majority of learners are already fluent in English to be able to tackle another language.

  • The aim of getting the Web translated into English is jeopardized by the amount of non-Anglophones at work here (including myself since I am French, learning French because this is currently the only way here for me to improve my English).

  • When I work on translations (a pretty tough task for me!), I am proposed to give my blessing to one out of 3 other translations (or 2 + mine). The bias is enormous because very often, none of the 3 versions proposed is good enough in my opinion (I realize that the English language is not good and/or there are misinterpretations of the French text). Therefore, in many cases, either the translation is faithful and the English is sub-optimal (my translations, for example) or the English is perfect but the meaning is wrong. (Not to mention that if I refuse to click on one of the 3 proposals, I won't get any point!).

  • In lessons, the English used is a kind of "globish", mostly American, not really standard English. Therefore, in the Discussion section, you can find quite a few comments from British learners about usage or spelling that obviously add to an overall confusion among non-Anglos.

  • I haven't yet been brave enough to try another language here so I can only judge from my perspective as an advanced English speaker and a very good French speaker/writer (no boasting, just to let you all know that this is rare in France!). Knowing that, because I visit this site everyday and respond to nearly all questions from other learners, I strongly recommend to IMPROVE the existing features :

please, Duolingo, RE-RECORD the French voice,

please FIX all bugs,

please IMPROVE the English language,

please IMPROVE features for natives' reporting on translations...

Then please, move to reverse languages for all of us eager to improve their English.

1/14/2013, 1:33:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/shalabajza

Screw your request, WE WANT SWEDISH.

I'm kidding, sorry. Yeah, that is a good idea. It would also be a good idea if Duolingo got a team of indie devs or fluent speakers of both English and (insert another language here) to volunteer to help make this system better, more stable and more versatile. I am a native Serbian speaker and I have been studying English for over 8 years. And if it weren't for my knowledge in English, I would have had a really hard time on using this website. So yeah, if anyone from the Duolingo crew feels like it, I am open to translate from English to Serbian and back, both textually and audio-wise (I have a condenser mic, so the sound quality is not really a problem.)

1/8/2013, 6:08:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/txarraga
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8

Yes!, why not Swedish Im sure there will be tons of swedes helping to do that! i am one ready to go for it! please!!

4/27/2013, 7:52:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/exarcadiaelux

I agree with that idea! But I'd also go so far as to say all languages should be connected. I am German and want to learn Spanish, so I have to sort-of do a double-translation every time I use Duolingo now. It would be more convenient if I could use German-Spanish translations. French-German should be an option, and Spanish-French, and Italian-Portuguese, and so on. And to nonstopneil: Germany is really not a regional language. In the European Union, for example, it is the language with the most native speakers, and only second to English in number of second-language speakers (numbers from 2007, could be different now). It's an official language in a surprisingly large number of countries ;)

1/8/2013, 8:39:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Mod
  • 22
  • 19
  • 18
  • 10
  • 8

Well that's the final goal anyway, but it's harder and longer to do, that's why I think it's better to start with both way translation in English first. But yeah, I see the future of Duolingo as a website where you subscribe knowing only one language, no matter which one, and you can then learn anyone you want starting from your native language. That would be pure awesomeness.

1/8/2013, 11:07:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/uhi888
  • 14
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2

I second that and also would like to have the opportunity to learn German => Spanish. At the moment my English speaking skills are enough but as soon as it will go into tenses I will mix up and will get "bad points" because I even do not know the proper tenses in English. So I would like to have a perspective if German => Spanish is anywhere on the road map for the near future?

1/9/2013, 1:38:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kmilo

That's true. In fact I am more than interested in learning German cause it opens great options for me all over Europe. By the way taiichii if I could help you with your spanish just let me know. ;)

1/9/2013, 4:24:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/nonstopneil

I was maybe imprecise with my comments on Italian and German, maybe I should have said uni-continental? What I mean is Portuguese, French, English and Spanish are each widely spoken on 3 continents, Arabic on 2, and Mandarin is the most spoken first language in the world. The idea of linking up these 6 languages (20 combinations?) to me makes more sense from a numbers perspective. That being said there are many people who speak French who learn German (and the reverse) so they could do research into common languages being learned by speakers. But linking say German (110-170 million) and Italian (60-75 million) seems like a misuse of resources compared to linking Spanish (375-400 million) and Mandarin (+900 million).

1/9/2013, 1:57:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ncoen98

English/Russian/Mandarin/French/Italian/Portuguese (Brazil)/German/Arabic = Kick Ass

We need Russian, Mandarin, and Arabic!

1/13/2013, 4:54:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/gnicop

It needs more russian. I can't read my russian authors or listen to my russian music without knowing russian.

1/11/2013, 1:21:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/akhansson
  • 10
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Russia is definitely a cool language that I would like to see being supported.

1/11/2013, 2:05:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreiMH
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11

+1

I am learning Portuguese through English, and while my English is pretty solid, my native languages are Spanish and German, and I would like to learn Portuguese through Spanish. And I know a lot of German people who would like to use Duolingo to learn English.

1/10/2013, 5:02:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

I already posted a message on the same topic on the page "Tired of seeing next language requests !?".

That + suggestion that existing languages have to be improved (significantly in French, namely).

1/8/2013, 12:53:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/martinm.eu

HI FIVE, Arjofocolovi. Your argument here is the first reason why 75% of people to whom I've recommended Duolingo - they didn't begin. They wanted to learn/improve English first...

1/9/2013, 3:38:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/guscruz

yes it is sometimes easier to learn other lamguages when you have a learn back other language....like am doing now learning portugese while using my knowledge of spanish

1/9/2013, 5:05:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/akhansson
  • 10
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

I hope that they will add more languages because the internet needs to be translated into english. But I can also agree with you Arjofocolovi. But my biggest wish right now is that they add Arabic.

1/9/2013, 12:44:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Mod
  • 22
  • 19
  • 18
  • 10
  • 8

Well that's your wish, sure, but I was more talking about improving Duolingo so it can welcome more people and give more opportunities to users. There will be a time when adding Arabic, Mandarin and other languages will come, but I don't think that's the priority right now.

1/9/2013, 3:13:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Aestatis

I think it would be a great idea. It seems to me like Duolingo is also trying to build a community, and this suggestion would help bring in other people. Perhaps these people will also end up sticking around and helping others with translation? If so, that would be another benefit to the program too.

1/10/2013, 1:37:28 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Honey_Bee

I find this whole site fascinating. I have a daughter on a church mission in Brazil. She used Rosetta stone for a few months before leaving to prepare. She already had Spanish and French under her belt. She has been gone for a year now and is so fluent in Portuguese that most people thinks she is native..even with all the dialects. I happened upon this app on my iphone because I wanted to learn the language and have conversations with her when she comes home in a few months. I am able to skype with some of the people in Brazil who have become her dear friends and this tool is wonderful for helping me learn. I only just found out that I can continue my lessons on my laptop instead of just my iphone. Such a bonus! I everyone's comments. Thank you, everyone.

1/12/2013, 2:27:58 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/studiodesigner

I dunno what other users feel...but for me "duolingo" is great for beginner. For additional tutors i use youtube. Actually friends this site worth a lot as its free.

1/13/2013, 4:07:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/cathygao
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

It would be nice to include all the six official UN languages. Therefore would love to learn Arabic on Duolinguo! ;) As well as Chinese and Russian. Including languages with a non-Latin script is not easy I guess, hope they will become available soon, good luck with any project until then! ;)

2/7/2013, 12:12:22 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/asac3000

Completely agree and I am ready to volunteer for French to English!

4/28/2013, 7:11:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Freedom42

As an ESL teacher I have many students I know could benefit greatly from this program using reverse learning. It would make a perfect practice engine for grammar lessons as homework and such.

Aside from a teaching aid, the idea struck me that If I could learn a third language using my second it would be especially amazing. I do not expect this any time soon if ever, but I hope I'll have the opportunity in the future for such study.

4/30/2013, 7:26:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/rehab

ARABIC AND ENGLISH too :) please

1/9/2013, 4:32:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ncoen98

PLEASE READ BEFORE VOTING THIS ^

As great of an idea as I think this is, I believe they should branch out before doing reverse learning. All of their languages, except german, are romance languages. I believe they should add Russian, Chinese, and another germanic language (Dutch?) before they do more reverse learning. I guarantee you that they, as a website, will get more traffic if they branch out for English speakers first. The founder, Luis, is also Spaniard so there is a little bias when it comes to the Spanish speakers getting reverse learning first. Quite frankly, It would be almost the same thing, because we work to and from both languages. I hope you understand my point of view.

1/13/2013, 4:47:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Mod
  • 22
  • 19
  • 18
  • 10
  • 8

No, I don't really get your point of view.

First, no matter which awesome languages we add, or how many different types of languages we have, the goal of Duolingo is for people to learn new languages.

Most people won't have either the time nor the motivation to learn English BEFORE they can learn any other language. So by not proposing reverse learning, you're taking out approximately 2/3 of the population (and I'm assuming the 1/3 is comfortable enough in English and have enough vocabulary for the lessons). This is quite huge don't you think ?

Having more traffic is one thing, but having active members is another. By adding more and more languages, sure you're reaching more and more people, but always the same people, the ones who already have a step in learning foreign languages. When they'll try to bring in their friends, they won't be able to, because their friends don't speak correct English. Eventually they will just check it out, try to learn a few words, and just give up because they don't have enough vocabulary for the rest (for example), and it would mean learning English first, then something else...

I guessed that Duolingo's founder was spanish, and I'm not shocked that Spanish has reverse learning, it's great, but it doesn't make any sense to not expand it to other languages.

In the last part of your post, I don't understand you anymore. You're talking about translating both ways, which is made possible by reverse learning, not adding new languages. If you're saying that we can translate both ways RIGHT NOW it's not true. If I go into "Translations", I can only translate from "French" to "English", and it's the same for the other languages I'm learning.

1/13/2013, 10:16:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ncoen98

Most of the people on this website probably speak Spanish or English, so this "2/3" of the world is irrelevant. Also consider that most of the people who DONT speak English or Spanish, are probably not native speakers of French, Italian, German, or Portuguese. Most of the people in these countries are bilingual. And their second language is normally English.

In the last part of my post, I was just plain wrong. (Its edited out now)

1/13/2013, 11:32:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Arjofocolovi
Mod
  • 22
  • 19
  • 18
  • 10
  • 8

Oh. I think you misunderstood me. When I said "population" I meant the world's population, not Duolingo's population.

Basically, my point was that by not using reverse learning on Duolingo, approximately 2/3 of the population with an internet access would not consider using Duolingo to learn a new language. Or if they do consider it at first, they would stop after a few attempts, because of their poor level in English, and their lack of motivation to learn two languages (English + the one they really care for) at the same time. Which is perfectly understandable.

As for your comment about people being bilingual in the countries you're quoting, I don't think you realize what you're saying :

Being bilingual means that you have more or less the same vocabulary, fluency, grammar knowledge and accent in both languages. I don't know where you're from but in France, I can assure you that there are very few bilingual people in English.

The French population is roughly as follows :

  • There are a lot of people who know a few words of broken English.
  • There are some people who can handle a conversation in English, but not very advanced, and can't understand a lot of things. These people are common, and are most of the time easy to recognize, because of their strong accent.
  • There are a small amount of people who are advanced speakers, comfortable with English, written or spoken, and could live in England, USA or Australia without any problem. I count myself among them.
  • And above all that, but very rare, there are the bilinguals. Of course you won't find this kind of people very often in France, and I think it's pretty much the same in any other European country.

But I agree on your last point, yes, English is the language people learn the most at school in Europe. It doesn't mean AT ALL they can speak it when they finished their studies (let alone speak it correctly). Hopefully it's slowly going to change with Internet and what people call the "globalization" but it's going to take time. Until then, I strongly suggest to Duolingo's team to provide reverse learning to ALL languages already existing, and of course implement it for the next languages as they come.

1/13/2013, 11:57:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/LaSperanza2

[Quote]''Also consider that most of the people who DONT speak English or Spanish, are probably not native speakers of French, Italian, German, or Portuguese. Most of the people in these countries are bilingual.'' [end quote] Most people in 'these countries' might have had lessons in English but most (I regularly meet foreign people) are not bilingual and even when they speak excellent English, they often lack cultural context/knowledge-I'll ignore the pronunciation and syntax! Hence, I believe reverse learning would be a powerful tool :D P.S. I say the above as an ex monolingual who apparently learnt three languages at school (English being one of them!) :D

2/10/2013, 5:19:17 PM
Learn a language in just 5 minutes a day. For free.