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https://www.duolingo.com/haleyjones97

Excited to learn Swedish!

haleyjones97
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I'm excited to learn Swedish! I'm also independently studying Russian (can't wait for the Duo Russian course!), which is kind of funny since since I've no Russian ancestry (and chose to learn the language anyway) but am 1/8 Swedish (and would love to visit my great-grandfather's hometown in Sweden someday). Anyways, I've heard that Russian grammar is a pain but Swedish grammar is pretty similar to English and is therefore relatively easy - anyone know if this is true? Since I'm also French Mediterranean (don't know how much but am dying to know!), I guess I'll study French a while after I've gotten more advanced in Russian and Swedish. Also, does anyone know of any good Swedish podcasts to listen to? Пожалуйста и спасибо!

2 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JoshMcSher
JoshMcSher
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I just started Swedish as well-it's such a fun language! From what I've gathered there are no verb conjugations and some words are similar to English. Good luck with your Swedish! :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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Verbs are conjugated according to the time form, but not according to the person.

Many words are indeed similar to English or (even more so) German, and the course on here actually takes learners pretty far. Have fun learning!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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Swedish is quite an easy language to learn. There are two genders, but not in the sense of Romantic languages. Essentially, the two genders are based on whether they are an en word or an ett word. For instance: En äpple, ett glas. (An apple, a glass) Depending on whether it is en or ett, the definite suffix and ending to and adjective describing the noun changes, for instance: äpplen, glaset. (The apple, the glass) En vackra äpple, en vackert glas. (A beautiful apple, a beautiful glass.)

Other than above, the grammar is pretty similar to English. Good luck!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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How do you mean the genders are different from the Romance languages? It works pretty much the same in Swedish as in for example French, with the technical distinction that ett-words are neuter, and the former feminine and masculine words have merged to form the en-word category.

It's also ett äpple, äpplet, ett vackert äpple (äpplen is plural) and ett glas, glaset, ett vackert glas.

An example of an en-word would be en häst (a horse): hästen, en vacker häst.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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So I have been saying äpple as an en word that whole time? Dang! I mean that it has less of an effect than with French. With French, if the adjective is plural, then you apply the plural form is effected by the gender of the adjective. Les belles filles, les beaus enfants. In Swedish, de vackra hästarna, flera vackra hästar, de väckra äpplena, flera väckra äpplen. Notice how the adjective does not change.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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Oh and the entire word does not change depending on its gender when it is indefinite. There is no rule for applying gender, so tvist could be the same gender as sluttning or emblem. In order to determine it, you could either throw a determinate suffix, or the indefinite determiner. In this case, it would be tvisten, sluttningen, emblet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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You have some interesting examples... :-) It's emblemet, though.

Oh and the entire word does not change depending on its gender when it is indefinite.

This I didn't understand, sorry.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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Sorry, that was badly worded! In french, the genders of the words pomme and garçon can be identified with their word structures, pomme being feminine and garçon being masculine, as pomme ends in an e. Whilst there are exceptions, there is a general rule. Whereas in Swedish, the gender of gång and handfat cannot be identified without some form of determiner, whether it be a definite suffix or an indefinite determiner. In the case, it is gången and handfatet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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True! But the overwhelming majority of the words are en-words, so if in doubt, go for that one...

And then there are of course words that change meaning depending on the gender, like en plan (field, as in sports field) and ett plan (plane, as in airplane). But those you have in other languages, too, of course (la/le tour, etc.).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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Have you finished your Swedish tree?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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Yes, I've finished the tree. In less than three hours back when it first came out (I'm a native speaker ;-) ).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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If you are native, why did you take the course in the first place? Were you just seeing what it was like?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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I did the tree because I wanted to help out by first of all reporting mistakes and missing translations (which is what beta testing is all about), and also to be able to help learners better when they have questions about the sentences it contains. This tree turned out to have very few mistakes and even quite few missing translations, compared to some of the other freshly baked courses on here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/finndj
finndj
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That makes sense!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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True, in plural you lose the distinction!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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Welcome to Duolingo. It is a great site.

How good is your Russian? You could try the English for Russian speakers course while you're waiting for the Russian for English speakers course.

There's a Swedish course for Russian speakers in development now on Duo, but it's not yet ready to be tested.

Best of success with Swedish! Once my Russian is better, I'll try it, too. Being of half Swedish descent as well as half Russian. I'm really eager to start Swedish, but Russian (and Latin review) are more than enough for now! When a kid, I asked my grandfather to teach me Swedish, as we visited him almost every week, but he would not. "It's not American," he told me. Well, one of these days I hope to learn it.

French is definitely a marvelous language--you'll probably like it, and it's very useful. (I learned to read it before Russian and am very happy to know it.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haleyjones97
haleyjones97
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Thanks for the warm welcome! :) My Russian is at a very basic level, I just started learning 3 weeks ago (via Memrise) and have mastered the Cyrillic alphabet and a few phrases. I'm not sure if I'm simply a slow learner or I just prefer to learn little by little, making sure I memorize what I've learned. I actually lived in Alaska for a few years when I was a bit younger and am just now realizing the Russian culture in the Anchorage area. Though I lived quite a bit north of Anchorage, I'm totally kicking myself for having not expressed interest in Russian culture/language at the time (not like the school I went to offered Russian anyway, buuuut). If only I could magically be fluent in Russian, Swedish and French right now like it was a superpower, that'd be awesome!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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You're welcome. It's great you've found Duolingo. Please accept some lingots to get started with.

And you are really in luck today, as the Russian for English speakers course has just begun its test and the developers are of course eager to have people help "break it in." The default alphabet is the Latin alphabet--not the developers' choice--but there is a little switch to set to change the letters to Cyrillic, for some typing practice. They've gone overboard with explanations at the beginning. The TTS (text-to-speech) voice is pretty good--better at full speed than slowed down. It looks like the course will be excellent.

It's not like many schools at all in the U.S. teach Russian, but what can we do? And if you ever find that magic wand, please clue me in. I don't call myself "slogger" for nothing and sure could use some kind of turbo-learning. No you're not a particularly slow learner, I'm sure. But all the work is definitely worth it. For instance, I'm a science fiction fan and can read SF to my heart's content now in 3 languages.

Have fun!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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We'd all like to be magically fluent... :-) But having a Duolingo course on the language you want to learn available to you is already pretty magical! X-)

Although I have found the courses on here really useful, the combined knowledge and helpfulness with regards to all things language related of the users on here is actually even cooler.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s128baetz
s128baetz
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Welcome to DuoLingo!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haleyjones97
haleyjones97
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Thank you! :D

2 years ago