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  5. "Ich koche und esse gerne."

"Ich koche und esse gerne."

Translation:I like cooking and eating.

November 19, 2013

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ofred19

"gern" literally translates to glad or gladly, right? So would "I cook and eat gladly" be a viable translation (albeit a rather literal one)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zagi1

I have reported it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1691

I suspect, the closest (and possibly related) English word is "eagerly". At least that's how I memorised "gerne".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stoproveritae

As it happens, the closest relative is "yearn". Doesn't really capture the meaning, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1691

Unfortunately, "yearn" is a verb, not an adverb in English. "Yearningly" is an adverb (at least according to the dictionary.com), but I don't think I've ever heard it being used in actual speech. I could imagine it being a synonym of "eagerly" though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hadert

That's all true, but I think stoproveritae is right - "yearn" should have been derived from the same Germanic root. Actually, [g] -> [j] is a pretty common transformation. I'm not sure about the etymology of "eager" though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EveMillington

look it up in a dictionary and 'gladly' is one of the first translations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/octavzlatior

Wow, so THAT's what it means. I was like 'how can like be an adverb'? Nice one :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nivea2

does anyone know why is "I cook and eat gladly" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RafaRiff

You may do something gladly without liking it. Gern implies that you like what you do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rodneyxhosa007

"Ich koche und esse gerne"doesnt make sence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emine145322

gerne is an adverb. Not a verb. That's why it makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Squirrelfood

Why not "I enjoy cooking and eating"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wingmannie

Can anyone tell me when to use "gern" and when to use "gerne"? I m a bit confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/89zahra

"gern" and "gerne" both have the same meaning, you can choose either to use gern or gerne based on what you think sounds better.

please correct me if I'm wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeoMan2

Nice explanation : ) This means both are correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pickypickyx10

Why "I gladly cook and eat" is not accepted, I don't know. It's a solid translation of "Ich koche und esse gerne" which is also common English. Yeah, I reported it, but I doubt I'm the first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/musick82

what's the difference between gernen and mag?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrekelley

Mögen is a verb, gern/gerne is an adverb. There is no such word as gernen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RO_Vlad

I used "I cook and eat with pleasure", wouldn't this work as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/panimidi

I think so. Anyone with a bit more knowledge?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adinkov2001

I wrote the same (I cook and eat with pleasure) and lost a heart. I reported it as it should have been correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidGourd

I wrote this (I cook and eat with pleasure) today--14-Feb-2020--and Duoligo still doesn't accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nancycd

Anyone know why I cook and like eating is not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanCellerOBryan

'gern(e)' goes with both. If one wanted to say that (admittedly unusual) sentence, you would have to structure it so it was clear that that's what you meant. Something like 'Ich koche, und ich esse gern(e).'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/votears

I believe that gerne can not be easily translated. It should be understood as "the subject is happy in the state of (the verb)"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1691

I think it can: "eagerly". "I do something eagerly" = "I like/enjoy doing it".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hadert

There is a very similar adverb in Russian - охотно (= с охотой - with genuine wish and delight to do smth.), so for me as a native Russian speaker it's easy. But in English one would probably have to use another verb - like or love - plus infinitive or gerund.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/O_Patife

Is also "Ich gerne koche und esse" right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

No, the verb has to be the second element in declarative sentences (statements).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chessdragonboge

whats the difference between gern and gerne


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deadpool723

I'm not sure I understand when to use 'gern' or 'gerne' but I believe that they mean with pleasure rather than like. For example 'ich gehe gern reiten' would mean that I go horse riding with pleasure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EveMillington

I cook and eat gladly is perfectly correct so why isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mylinda397188

It says "type the German you hear" but I think it actually wants the English translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kstrtmn

It seems no one has answered why, "I cook and like eating." not an accepted answer. What is wrong with I cook and like eating?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PopSixSquish

When do I use 'gern' and when do I use 'mag'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/txsoldier94

Why not:

I like to cook and eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidGourd

I put in "I like to cook and eat" and Duolingo accepted it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Udit230817

How would you say " I cook and like to eat"

Basically what I am asking what if I don't mind (but don't dislike) to cook but really like to eat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thiagocavila

Isn't it ambiguous? Could it be understood as 'I am cooking and like to eat'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeltaDry

I believe "I cook and eat with pleasure" is an acceptable answer. I am reporting it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielStermer

How do you even know what someone is saying? You have to wait until the end of the sentence.

Downvote me here, but English makes sentence construction much simpler.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hadert

And German disciplines you to never interrupt your interlocutor ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hadert

But, seriously, the intonation is different. If the verb is not stressed, then there should be some important information to follow, which might change its meaning, like an adverb or a negation. But that's not only in German, stress indicates the key word of the sentence in many languages. Also in many languages the word order doesn't change in interrogative sentences, so you have to wait until the end to find out whether the intonation is rising or not. So it's much more common than one might think.

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