1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Russian
  4. >
  5. "Is Dima busy? Yes, he is doi…

"Is Dima busy? Yes, he is doing homework."

Translation:Дима чем-то занят? Да, он делает уроки.

November 2, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marysha91

Я написала: Дима занят? Да, он делает домашнюю работу. Вполне приемлемый вариант


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex_tv80

У меня приняли: "Дима занят? Да он делает домашнее задание"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kpagcha

What does чем-то mean in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Занят can mean just busy/occupied or occupied with something (cf. «заниматься чем-то»). The author of the sentence preferred to use "Is Dima busy with something?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaeZqlUw

Спасибо. It's a bit unfortunate/frustrating that the author did not include the "with something" clause in the sentence- especially at the introductory level of the section.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil_Stracchino

Indeed. If the creator of the sentence wanted чем-то to be part of the Russian translation, then perhaps "with something" should be part of the English sentence. Otherwise, the only way to know you're expected to translate "busy with something" is to translate just "busy" and get it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mallowigi

i thought чем-то was refering of doing something but not being sure what? I think here чем-нибудь would be more appropriate since it is the action of being busy that is interesting, not in what.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniloAustria

I find чем-то to be more fitting. reason being that you need to be busy on something that is not actually an abstract thing. he is working on something, hence why he is busy. no idea what he is working on, but we know it exists. As mentioned in the notes чем-нибудь is something hypothetical. that is more along the lines: this is unbearable, something needs to happen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenCostell3

Can we use занят ли? Or just занят? I understand the use of чем-то, but I don't think there's any way that an English speaker would think of translating "is he busy?" With, essentially, "is he busy with something?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neon_Iceberg

"Занят ли? in this particular case is ok. But in most cases the choice with "ли" is something like a short form of a whole phrase: "is he busy or not?" = "он занят или нет?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterLevin1

Word order question: Must "чем-то" come before "занят"? Is that the best way to say it in Russian? Is "Дима занят чем-то?" also possible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johncummin7

"Занят ли дима? Да он работает над домашним заданием" Правильно? Лучше, хуже?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neon_Iceberg

"Занят ли Дима?" is ok, but "он работает над домашним заданием" would be "he works on homework".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/headchop

Why is уроки used here, and not урок?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joseperus

Don't trust me, but my guess is that it's the plural of урок (... "the lessons")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelanieGustafson

When do you use чем-то and when do you use что-то?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

чем is one of the forms of что.

It is just that in Russian "to be occupied with (NOUN)" is быть занятым + Instrumental .

chto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffCat6

Couldn't find the exact form for занят under занятой. Found it hiding in the short form of занятый. Phew.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex540468

"учит уроки" звучит по-русски лучше


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruno241677

Why чем то is accepted and чем-то denied ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevinFerna912326

Dima should be a girl not a boy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Dima is a diminutive of Dmitri, a man's name.

I don't believe there is a Russian girl's name, Dimitra, so Dima couldn't be used for a girl.

Dimitra is a Greek girl's name, meaning a follower of the goddess Demeter.

Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.