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"Mamá, no encuentro mis zapatos."

Translation:Mom, I do not find my shoes.

5 years ago

85 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OliverWalsh

'I do not find my shoes' reads and sounds horrible.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SherryMurp

beautifully said

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Denishutch

Agreed. 'I can't find my shoes' is the natural expression. 'I don't find...' is not used except figuratively, as in 'I don't find that amusing '

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BGooge
BGooge
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I lost a heart for "mother" rather than "mom" - So irritating!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QuinnMoore
QuinnMoore
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Mommy doesn't work either....

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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They have "mami" for that fyi.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZheGreatest

that is another definition

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

mommy works now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acalleyne

i don't say mom unless irritated by my mother so i alway say mommi

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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"Mamá" is usually "Mom" while "Madre" is used for "Mother" but I agree, it should accept either.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/victoriarose07

I agree with Madre being more similar to Mother. I always thought of Mamá as just being Mama though and Ma for Ma.

Looking for other ways to express this: Mami and Mamita seem closer to "Mummy" and "Mum," but I'm not sure if those are used more regionally or not. But they seem like more approximate translations to me than Mamá.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AkAlan

I think it is important to differentiate the difference between Mother and Mom. That is what we are here to do, learn the language. "mama" does not translate to "mother" from what I can see.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StrapsOption
StrapsOption
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'Mam' isn't working either...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anusha948919

WOAH THOSE LANGUAGES

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Helotech

same here

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lunarefiore

Me to

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZheGreatest

well thats not good! it should work

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hema90

It says "I cannot find my shoes" is correct, whereas that should be "no puedo encontrar mis zapatos", no?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clucl3

It literally translates to "I don't find my shoes", I can't find is just a clean English translation, the two sentences have the same meaning.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aprenderespecial

So to a native Spanish speaker does it sound more natural to say, "...no encuentro..." or "...no puedo encontrar..." when expressing one can't find something?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K.Madejski

My spanish friend said that they both mean the same and can be used interchangeably, "no puedo encontrar" being more formal. And for example "Puta! no encuentro mis zapatos".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesBlask
JamesBlask
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Thanks for that. It also makes a little more sense now why my Mexican wife sometimes says "don't" instead of "can't"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbokhari

Someone please answer this. It doesn't seem right...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/astroMD77

Very good question.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CyanJoke

I was afrid to write that, but that is more correct translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David1945

An native English speaker would not use this sentence but would say 'I can't find my shoes'. The construction "Ido not ......' would be used for something over a longer period of time, for example; 'I do not go to school anymore'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/y4rdb1rd

Yep. Seen this a few times now with different sentences. "I don't/do not find" is just poor English and sounds bad.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SherryMurp

I do not find my shoes Are you kidding me? who says that. I can not find my shoes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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I cannot find my shoes is an acceptable translation too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patrickjk94

They don't have a report option for i spelled it wrong but got it right anyways.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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What did you spell wrong? I had the same thing, you should report with the last checkbox, the one with the empty box.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gerrydee

same old problem- she would say :" I can't find my shoes " not "i do not find my shoes"- that just ain't English as she is spoke.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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"I can't find my shoes." is accepted as a good translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanRoth2
DanRoth2
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Duo marked me wrong for "am not finding." I thought that present tense conjugation was the same for "I find," "I do find," and "I am finding" (for example). Is this different for negative phrasing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnda.ve

I tried the same thing because "I do not find my shoes" sounded so unnatural. It marked it wrong for me too.

Generally it is not different for negative phrasing, it could be they just forgot to enter it as an alternative translation.

According to others, it accepts "I cannot find my shoes", which is a better way to say it in English anyway.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jyjyjane

YOU SAY ...........Be careful not to confuse "Mamá" and "mama"! Why ....sorry but I do not understand?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asciident

Colloquially (especially online) they are read the same way (i.e. "mom"), but mama with no accent is also a translation for "mammary gland"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catcampion

I tried "mama" on my google translate ap and it only gave, "it sucks." Is it also a verb? Google translate website gave, "mammary gland."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Yes, it's a verb: mamar. (from the mammary glands) http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/mamar

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RastaFerrari

Google translate is not a reliable source

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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mamá=mom mama=mamma

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Since my above comment has a total of -2 votes, i will clarify:

The Spanish word "mamá" corresponds to many English names for a mother, like mom, mama, or mum. The Spanish word "mami" is more like mommy or mummy, and the Spanish word "mama" means the same as English "mamma".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynxsibley

This sentence is used quite often by my little brother...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BabyDuckDino

I translated this as "I am not finding my shoes" I don't understand why that is not am acceptable option?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prabhuvinuta

Why is "I am not finding my shoes" wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

"Mama" is missing from your sentence for starters. "Find" and "finding" are two different words in Spanish just like they are in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnda.ve

"I find" and "I am finding" in English are both considered present tense. Duolingo usually accepts both forms as a translation for "encuentro".

This is because in English, speaking in the present tense, we rarely say "I find" to describe something we are doing right at that moment. It is usually reserved for something we usually do (i.e. "I find it is easier to get permission than ask for forgiveness".) If we are talking about our present actions, we use "I am finding". However, in Spanish, they use "encuentro" to describe what they are doing in the present. They also use "estoy econtrando", but it does not seem to be as common.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prabhuvinuta

I used "Mother, I am not finding my shoes". DL marked "I am not finding" as wrong :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PierreGaud1

Should "Mom, I am not finding my shoes." be an acceptable translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnda.ve

I am reporting that. I can't see why it won't be correct. They do accept "I cannot find my shoes", which is even better in English, but "I am not finding" is also a good way to say it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phanie13

I write "Mummy, I don't find my shoes" and it is wrong ? Please, could you tell me why ? I am not an english native and I thought Mum or Mummy it is the same. Thanks a lot.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asciident

Duolingo tends to focus on US English, so "mummy" isn't the same word as in British English. You should report it as a correct translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnda.ve

Phanie13, since you said you weren't an english native..... In the U.S. it is "mom" and "mommy". You can also say "mama" and in some places of the country "ma"...although that last one is losing popularity.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/defiantoli

Mum and mummy are the same in english there is no difference in meaning at all. Mother is the same meaning but is more formal. You would call your own mother mum or mummy. If you are older normally you would not call your mother mummy as it is childish nor refer to someone else's mother as "your mummy" . You would also only ever say mother when talking about someone else's mother or maybe mum if it was a close friend.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

when I talk about my own mother I often say "my mother"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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But do you call her "my mother"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Yes and no. We usually say "mother" when we are exasperated with her. lol

In the U.S. we do not use "mum" or "mummy". Mum is to keep quiet about something and mummy is what you find in an Egyptian tomb. Here it is "mom" and "mommy".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/victoriarose07

It's a slight difference in spelling, but they convey the same meaning. I am Canadian but my family are from the UK and so I am used to using a "u" instead of an "o." It's understood regardless. And, To keep mum is actually a British term.

I think everyone is just missing the point- That all these terms are used for the same purpose, but have different nuances. And it is the same in Spanish as well. I think if you are going to learn a new language, you need to have a feeling about a word. Not just a literal translation.

@Phanie13: Think of "mom" or "mum" as being more informal, something you would use when talking to your mum or about your mum when with friends. Mother is more formal and you might use it to explain a relationship with people you don't know well. For instance, you are out with your mum and run into your boss. You might introduce them by saying: "insert name here This is my mother, insert name here. Mum, this is my boss, insert name." If that helps.

"Mummy" (or "Mommy" for picky spellers) is usually used as an affectionate term a younger child uses to speak to their mum. For instance, "Mummy, I have to go potty!" "Mummy, I have an owie!" It's usually thought of as "baby language."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Debbmall

I got it right, but a more natural translation would have been I can't find my shoes, but I was afraid they might have marked it wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaydavenport

Momma, as in Momma dearest, was not acceptable to DL! Do these guys speak English?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Certainly you can't list all the "mum" or "mummy" variants! I don't understand why people want ALL the variants for mummy to be accepted. Isn't it enough to have one or two, and to try to use the more common? When it's a variant in the way to say something, it's interesting, but here, what is the point?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Agent_Gabriel

Mom's reply to "Mom, I do not find my shoes":

LAZY!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimijimmy

Honestly I think every variant for "mama" should be accepted like mother, momma, mummy, etc. We need to report it or nothing is going to change.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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"But really I hid them so I don't have to go to school." :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fuddytree

I am an English person living in Spain - learning Spanish. I find with Duolingo you have to think "South American" Spanish & "North American" English before you give your answers. It makes it slightly more difficult but other than that, and the odd "strange" translation, I'm finding Duolingo a good revision/memory tool. And, yes, in English we would definitely say "I can't find my shoes". I put this and was marked correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adrienne.Pain

why is my answer wrong for writing 'mummy' and not 'mom' - I am not American!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dudley70

I have never heard of I do not find my shoes. She already searched for them so it should be did not

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miksev

Why is "Mom, I did not find my shoes."accepted? Flows better in english then do not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnda.ve

Because that is past tense and implies you have stopped looking for your shoes. Where in Spanish it is present tense, and you are still looking for your shoes, but have not yet found them.

Duolingo accepts "I cannot find my shoes", although it does not accept "I am not finding my shoes"....the latter seems correct to me, so I am reporting it (9/2/2016)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RawrKiwiz

Would I use Puedo encuentro for I can not find my shoes? Or does no encuentro work the same? I am confused.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnda.ve

I'm not sure if Duolingo would accept it, but if you want to use "puedo" in front of the verb, then the verb needs to change to an infinitive:

"no puedo encontrar mis zapatos"

Duolingo is expecting "no encuentro mis zapatos"

It literally means "I don't find my shoes", which is awkward in English, but perfectly acceptable in Spanish.

FYI, Duolingo does accept "I cannot find my shoes" as the English translation for "no encuentro mis zapatos", it could easily accept "no puedo encontrar mis zapatos" in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kattiebellbell

is "mum, i can't find my shoes" ok?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnda.ve

Duolingo accepts the "can't find my shoes" part, but it might not have "mum" as an acceptable translation for "mamá". Others have been complaining about that. Mark it wrong if it rejects it because of that. "Mum" should be an acceptable translation of "mamá"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kattiebellbell

thanks much :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anusha948919

whiny much..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sbough

Terrible sentence... doesn't sound right in English

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

My daily morning routine...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Provinfistoris

I would say I did not find my shoes, but that doesn't work either. did not being past tense, so I guess it doesn't work here, but present tense verbs in spanish translate over very badly.

Like when it says she opens the window[Ella abre la ventana]. No one says that, we would say she opened the window. Opens is only accurate at the exact moment she is doing it, and no one defines things that way. I only see definitions like that in translated works, because the translator doesn't natively speak english to understand that no one speaks that way. I see it all too frequently on here where I use a past tense expression because it's the way we speak, and the site wants a literal one, which sounds terrible. I think it's more important to get the heart of what's being said rather than the exact literal, which doesn't translate well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MouseEZ

https://www.merriam-webster.com/

This book helps when learing english.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanishgirl008

the English translation for this sentence should be "mother, I cannot find my shoes." because the current translation, "Mom, i do not find my shoes." sounds quite bad and should be corrected and revised by an English professor.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel303668

It accepted "Mom did not find my shoes." which I wrote.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosieStrawberry

I love this sentence! It makes me feel so much at home :)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoraMearns

I was correct

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katkatiekat

If there is not a similar sentense referring to a father, "dad i can't find my shoes' this implies owmen are solely responsible for house chores, and house realated issues within the family.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thesnowmaster

huh? :-\

1 month ago