"Good night, mom."

Translation:Спокойной ночи, мама.

November 3, 2015

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaymaetadi

can we also say dobrey nochi ?? no ??

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenKoslov

absolutely, i am telling you this like a person who's first language is russian ;)

June 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seg0y

yes, you can

March 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

In one sentence, they use a conjugation of добре and in another they use спокойной for "good" and I haven't figured out if they are interchangeable or if they somehow depend on context.

December 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenFresoli

This might be old but i'll put this here for if anyone else comes by. Спокойной translates to calm, and спокойной ночи is a farewell phrase used the same way as good night in english, добрый вечер is a greeting that translates to good evening

July 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gcmartinelli

I agree... Duolingo does a terrible job explaining differences like these... they just throw them at you. Gives me the impression of a course made by robots using Google Translate (I know this isnt the case but the lack of more in depth explanations gives this general feeling in my opinion).

May 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qwentarie

There is no difference in meaning. I am a born Russian, and this Duolingo-implied difference in meaning is ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤. They mark доброе утро (добрый день, вечер) and et cetera as valid translations to good morning (afternoon/day and evening). Sometimes, they even mark good night as доброй ночи. But not this time. Why? It's a bug, I guess, or they missed it.

Don't worry - there is literally no difference at all between using доброй or спокойной ночи. They both mean that you are wishing another person to have a kind, or a quiet, peaceful night. And both are mostly just idiom noise by now because no one actually pays attention to what is being wished in particular, or why we have to say it before night. We just do. It's polite, and bears almost no meaning on its own. That's all.

But remember that спокойной (спокойного) can't be used with anything else but "night". Using that qualifier for "day" or "evening" or even "morning" is not a thing, and would likely sound stupid.

Although, when you are making a joke between two friends (or close family members) you might use спокойного дня (спокойного вечера, спокойного утра) when the person wants to take an uncharacteristic nap during the day (evening or morning, respectively). Simply by association with the "good night" idiom. It won't be correct, but people sometimes use it as a joke.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morgoth57

спокойной ночи is incorrect. Спокойной is the singular form, yet ночи is plural. It should be спокойные ночи.

July 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qwentarie

Спокойной ночи is correct. It means = have a quiet night. Спокойные ночи = the nights are quiet.

See the difference? One is singular, another plural. Ночь is a feminine word, singular, meaning "night", used in Nominative or Accusative Cases. When it is used in Instrumental Case, it becomes "ночью". When you use this word in Genitive, Dative, or Prepositional Cases, it becomes "ночи" and thus all of its adjectives (спокойная, in this specific example) have to shift accordingly.

You are being confused by the adjective, I understand. But check out the usage of спокойной. It is never used with anything but the feminine singular in Accusative, Genitive, Prepositional, Instrumental or Dative Cases. Which this sentence exactly happens to be.

So Nominative Case = спокойная ночь. (A quiet night) . Accusative Case = Cпокойной ночи. ((Have) a quiet night).

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdithFrank1

would dobrey nochi work too?

July 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IgorZakhariyash

доброй ночи = спокойной ночи

September 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew_stucken

Unfortunately, that is not accepted. Reported.

May 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OSolovei

not exactly you can use доброй ночи as a greeting and rarely as a farewall, but you can never use спокойной ночи as an evening greeting, only as a evening farewall or a wish before bed

June 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KhadidjaN

I thought so, but this language surprises me every single day :)

February 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ludmila009

Доброй ночи-это вполне корректно. Такой ответ должен приниматься.

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onntastic

Can we uses Dobriyi nochi here too? Or is Spok oinoi informal?

February 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenKoslov

We can , but duo won't let you

June 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

Why is it ночи and not ночь?

April 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gulpepper

It's in genitive. It is commonly used in "wish sentences" - which in english stuff like "have a nice day"

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walter413236

As a quick form of good night, like g'night, I've seen споки ночи

January 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrettPotom

Why do you use "добрый" for "good afternoon" but "спокойнй" for "goodnight"?

September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenKoslov

we use both, it's the drawback of duo , man

June 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenKoslov

WTF?! I am a native, and we also say GOOD NIGHT like you guys. it both means ДОБРОЙ and СПОКОЙНОЙ НОЧИ. Stupid stpid duo! I am so angry

June 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max122917

So you meant calm evening?

March 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElenaMigun

Доброй ночи тоже правильно!

May 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tejabhilash

Dont habe russian keyboard and hence cant type

June 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Artem440013

Why "Доброй ночи, мама" is not accepted? it is common figure of speech in Russian and completely synonymous

September 9, 2019
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