1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Russian
  4. >
  5. "Пока!"

"Пока!"

Translation:Bye!

November 4, 2015

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suzaku3

Sounds just like the Japanese word for stupid/idiot lol ばか (baka)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fung11691

As well as "Bastard" in Cantonese (仆街, literally means die on street) lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adq2

Yes, sounds just like the word to my native Japanese ears too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meseri0

annoying tsundere voice Baka


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lordlahmacun

"I-it's not like i want to invade Ukraine Putin-san baka!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoelGoetowski

Пока, бака.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MThoriqMalano

That's what I thought tol (笑)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvaIvka

Baka in croatian means grandmom :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonafown

Baka in Tagalog (filipino) and most Filipino languages (i.e. Cebuano, prolly Waray-Waray, Ilocano, etc.) means cow... (from the spanish vaca)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wassimch

Hahaha I thinked the same what it say bakka? Lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickC77

Is it just me or the " о " and the " а " sounds really similar. Does any have a tip to help differentiate them?

Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/user1532

When "о" is in an unstressed syllable, it sounds like an "а". Only when stressed is it an "о". In this case, the stress is on the last syllable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

Now that makes sense. Does the stress fall in a regular place in the word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/millermargot

No, it varies for every word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickC77

Спасибо !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arracachaco

That's a great tip, but I'd like to insist to be sure: when unstressed, the o sounds exactly like the a? Or does it keep a bit of an o "soul", if you know what I mean? Oh, and another question if I may: how to recognise the stressed syllable in a word? Are there any rules for that? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/user1532

I wasn't too specific in my original comment. The pronunciation of unstressed vowels changes from word to word and is often different even in the same word. For example, in молоко (milk), the first о is a /ə/ (schwa) sound, but the second о is pronounced /ɐ/. In пока, the о is also pronounced /ɐ/, so it is not exactly an /a/. I'd recommend looking at the IPA vowel chart at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vowel to learn the differences between these sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PLLumsdaine

The rule is pretty consistent, as I was taught it:

  • in the stressed syllable of a word, it’s /o/
  • in the syllable immediately before the stress, it’s /ɐ/
  • in all other syllables, it’s a schwa, /ə/

So it varies a lot, but quite predictably.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azaroma

I believe it's a schwa sound


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duffbones

There are not any rules for stresses in Russian. By heart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Relora

Not necessarily 100% true. In the word for milk -- Молоко -- thag first 'о' is almost silent. This silence occursnin other words with multiple unstressed 'о'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrtaVernon

Doesn't пока also mean "see you later?" or have I have been understanding it my whole life?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bill.grimmett

Yes, See You Later, or After a While. Пока often appears in other contexts having to do with passage of time which is not specified. I found this in a child's reader and grammar "Что Я Видел" on the second page: "И там он пока будет жить." which means and there he will live for a while.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizandroH1

The more near meaning literally would be 'till' but it refers, yes, to 'see you later'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scream.jpg

Пока simply means "bye"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmexyOryx

Isn't "bye" dasvidania? Or is that the formal way, and this is the informal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/madame.fikes

That's my understanding--like bye vs goodbye


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RainbowWis1

I've studied russian for about 3 years now at school! It might be the only thing I know but ,,Да свидания" or however it is written means ,,Goodbye/Bye"! I don't inderstand what's the differnce eighter!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

"Пока!" is informal. You don't use it where you need to be respectful (e.g. to your boss, the prime minister, etc.).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spirus123

Do svidania is more polite and formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bill.grimmett

Пока has the colloquial meaning of "bye." But this is not its literal meaning. Later, or After a While might be better interpretations. Пока appears in other contexts having to do with passage of time which is not specified. I found this in a child's reader and grammar "Что Я Видел" on the second page: "И там он пока будет жить." which means "And there he will live for a while."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isaacunibe

Пока also sounds like in spanish “vaca" it means “cow" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizandroH1

The more near meaning literally would be 'till' but it refers to 'see you later'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyRemedy

Why does it translate to "till"? Would this be the common way of saying "bye" in Russian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

"Until" or "till" is a very common way of saying "see you" in other languages. "See you later", "See you tomorrow", etc. "Until later", "Till tomorrow", etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dron007

In russian it is "до скорого" (see you soon).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyRemedy

Спасибо.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lotus192383

Пока is something you use over the phone. Its very informal. To my understanding, as i have a Russian stepmother, you dont really use it anywhere else cause it's considered rude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kdammers

Well, my Russian friend (college-aged) used it all the time at then end of our conversations as he left my dorm room.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CSGORussian

Is it me or the P is more like B here? Baka! If so, any particular reason?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NinjiKai

pOKa lEna pRoblEms (totally not from the animation meme community)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cass471134

The green bird annoys me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JStA131069

Frechheit "Bye" als falsche Antwort zu werten. Man hört doch nicht das dahinter ein Ausrufezeichen steht !!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skip-it

It's funny. I missunderstand it in school. I thought it means "hi" because in polish we have "cześć" it means bye and hi, like italian ciao.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jj0123456

Is it making a "p" sound or a "b" sound?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cmiket74

Until should still count as the literal meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jean610490

if its wrong why you,dont say the correct sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cohen99

пока means bye and not goodbye i got the wrong answer for writing goodbye it doesn’t seem to make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JStA131069

Frechheit "Bye" bei "Schreibe was du hörst" als falsche Antwort zu werten.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayAbrams1

I inputted Bye and it said I was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikhailPrudnikov

Как интересно читать комменты англичан...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric240613

Honestly, I heard it as vodka.

Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.