"Утебяестьлошадь?"

Translation:Do you have a horse?

3 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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Can anyone clarify the pronunciation of лошадь? I can't hear an 'л' sound at all in the TTS voice, and it sounds as if it starts with a vowel.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanisaChatte
JanisaChatte
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It is pronounced " loshad' ". And the stress is on the "o".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blockhause
Blockhause
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Thank you I couldnt figure it out for days

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tor_Heyerdal
Tor_Heyerdal
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Actually, the final "d" is pronounced like a "t". So it's more like "loshat". And the "a" is pronounced kind of like an "uh" because it's unstressed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NachmanAvram

It's not a t, it's a soft d, they sound similar but your tongue is more flat against your palette.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tor_Heyerdal
Tor_Heyerdal
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That's not what the actual Russian-speaking people have been telling me here. I'll take the native-speakers' word for it when they tell me that all word-final consonants are unvoiced. Although yes, it is "soft"; the technical term is palatalized. It's a palatalized dental "t". IPA: [loʂət̪ʲ]. All word-final "д"s become "т"s, just as word-final "б"s become "п"s (like in хлеб, which is pronounced with a final "p" instead of a final "b"), and word-final "г"s become "к"s, and word-final "ш"s become "ж"s, and word final "з"s become "с"s. Many Russians don't consciously realize this about their own language, and this is one of the things that creates a Russian accent in English, when Russian-speaking people do this same thing in English, because it's subconscious for them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mtyx.
Mtyx.
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"and word-final "ш"s become "ж"s,"

i think you have that backwards ж becomes ш

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyoossaev
iyoossaev
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“All word-final "д"s become "т"s” Really, all? Preceding consonants can't voice it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasSebastiamAC

@iyoossaev

Preceding consonants never interfere with the of the subsequent ones, like in English: it is ever in the opposite direction. So, if you have 'vgdj' at the end of a word, or whatever, the whole cluster will be devoiced, with no exception, giving 'fktj'.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/monica67

So that's what's going on with the ь? It's been driving me crazy! I had no idea what that was doing to the word and it made for horrible spelling! So what about the ы? That one has a sound, doesn't it? Like in ты?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary19638
Mary19638
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I translated this as "Have you a horse" but the system corrected it to "Have you got a horse". I disagree. The word "got", though allowable in that English sentence, is unnecessary.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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Absolutely. Report it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ma.PaulaCo

Have can't be used to ask questions in that way. You need an auxiliary verb in the sentence, like "do you have a horse?"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dblokillo
dblokillo
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So, would this у тебя есть be use for singular you, plural you or both?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berniebud
Berniebud
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Singular 'you'. Plural 'you' would be "У вас".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rajdeep07VR

Isn't Конь Horse?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyoossaev
iyoossaev
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Well, you can ask this question OR you can read the comments :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Uni2cornio
Uni2cornio
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;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piper2000
piper2000
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I tried answering "Do you have the horse?", because as I understand right now, Russian lacks articles so the sentences should be interchangeable. Is there a different way to say this if you are talking about a specific horse?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyoossaev
iyoossaev
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Yes – simply use the word "this” (э́тот - э́та - э́то) or "that" (то́т - та́ - то). For instance: The horse (which) you see is big should be in that vein: Эта лошадь, которую ты видишь — большая

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agnatos

The last "d" sound more like a "ti" (palatal t I guess)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasSebastiamAC

As explained in the lesson instructions, any word-final consonant or consonantal cluster is unvoiced. So 'd' becomes 't', 'dj' becomes 'tj' and so on.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabrielsilffre

why does the letter "o" sound like "у" in this one?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanisaChatte
JanisaChatte
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It sounds like an "o " to me, but that might be because I've been listening to and speaking Russian all my life :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyoossaev
iyoossaev
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For the same reason "o" sounds like "o" (= orange) or "ow" (= ergo) or "oo" (= prove) in English ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tor_Heyerdal
Tor_Heyerdal
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It won't let me reply to your comment in the other sub-thread, so I'll reply to you here. You asked "“All word-final "д"s become "т"s” Really, all? Preceding consonants can't voice it?" To which my response would be that as far as I know, the answer here is no. Consonants do not determine the voicedness of the following consonant, but rather the previous one. For example, in "всё", the в does not voice the с, but rather the other way around. The с devoices the в.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyoossaev
iyoossaev
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Oh, good to know. I made the assuption that it works as in Polish, where the preceding consonant can block unvoicing of the final one. Thanks =]

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tor_Heyerdal
Tor_Heyerdal
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You're welcome. Though I'd just like to stress once more that this is just "as far as I know". This is what it was saying in the Tips & Notes section of one of these sections. Although it's worthy of note that it didn't mention if the voicing assimilation works differently in word-final clusters. The lack of mention about that leads me to conclude that it doesn't, but just because it didn't mention a difference doesn't mean that there necessarily isn't one. However, that being said, I decided to look into this on Wikipedia before finalizing this comment, and my research there would suggest that I'm correct; it does not work the same way as it does in Polish.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_phonology#Phonological_processes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acastilloflores
acastilloflores
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So far it seems to me that the sound of л is rather soft.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasSebastiamAC

It's not. A soft л is similar to Potuguese 'lh', whereas a hard л is similar to the English 'dark l'. As a Portuguese speaker, I can't hear the first one here.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanyDin
DanyDin
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why тебя and not ty(don't have the russian letters atm)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyoossaev
iyoossaev
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Case declension, у requires the genitive.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasSebastiamAC

Isn't that an accusative?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RussianBugsBunny

How would someone know if this was a question or a statement when speaking??

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasSebastiamAC

By intonation. Interrogative sentences have a rising tone towards the end.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasSebastiamAC

Does a soft consonant assimilate to a hard following consonant? For example, is the -ть in есть лошадь hardened by the following ло-?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xwurzelx

I am forever mishearing лошадь as площадь

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Valtv2

i have metwurst

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brage04

why лошадь and not лошат?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malka866400

My answer is correct

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redbluerat

Critical sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RitBose14

No, because not everyone is as rich as you.

1 year ago
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