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  5. "Il fera beau demain."

"Il fera beau demain."

Translation:It will be nice tomorrow.

January 7, 2013

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serxwebun

I understand why you would accept answers with the word "weather" in them, but it is implied in this sentence and may also be implied in English, i.e. "It will be beautiful tomorrow."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acarruth

I wrote "It will be nice tomorrow" but that wasn't accepted. I agree that it is strange to explicitly say weather in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

"It will be nice tomorrow" is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jekesq

I had the same problem. Weather is clearly implied, and it would not be proper to use that word in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Yes, you could totally say, "it will be nice weather tomorrow", or "there will be nice weather tomorrow", as well as "it will be nice tomorrow.". Any of those would be unremarkable where I live, anyhow. (Western Canada)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeledaLorakeet

As of now including the word weather seems to be no longer accepted. Kind of weird. French in DL seems to switch from idiomatic to literal translations and it does suck... Other languages are way more consistent in DL.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cockroachlurcher

What about he will be beautiful tomorrow? how else would you say it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/super_moi

It would be "il sera beau demain". The combination "faire beau" is only used to express good weather.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deborah820362

Then can 'Il fera beau demain' also mean "The weather will be fair tomorrow"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

It's a bit ambiguous.

"Fair weather" is becoming an expression: a "fair weather friend" is only your friend in good times, and you might refer to something occurring in "fair weather or foul".

But "fair" is beginning to lose the general meaning of "nice/good/beautiful" in ordinary usage. We don't usually say, "She's a fair woman", or "It's a fair day" with that meaning. More often, now, fair means kind of so-so, not great, not terrible, and if you say, "The weather will be fair," people may well misunderstand which meaning you have in mind.

I am mindful that the above may be not universally applicable in the English-speaking world, but it's pretty widespread in North America, at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sloppyorrus

'it will be beautiful tomorrow' is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amtwt01

I wrote "it will be a beautiful day tomorrow" and was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Because you added words unnecessarily. There is no need to approximate the meaning when a direct translation into clear idiomatic English is available.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraGemin

This is about the weather. So the word weather should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yiannis49

Shouldn't you accept "The weather will be nice tomorrow"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quisperk

Why not "it is going to be nice tomorrow"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quisperk

Why not "it is going to be nice tomorrow"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkHolden8

Since we are talking about the weather "it will be fine tomorrow" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/10Vo8Cvs

"It is going to be nice tomorrow" not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandro.Steve

Should "It is going to be beautiful tomorrow" be accepted, or does it stray too far in the verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

"It's going to be nice tomorrow," rejected.

"Will be," and "going to be" not sufficiently interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minimi1984

What is the root of this word fera?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhebrica

It is the future tense, third person singular form of faire "to do/make".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrancesOsb1

'It will be fine tomorrow' should be accepted. In the UK, at least, it means fine weather.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2067

It is accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rosiecas81042

Absolutely! 'It will be fine tomorrow' is perfectly correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trocan
  • 1578

Duolingo you do not have "It" why you keep asking for it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2067

When speaking about the weather, English uses "it". It's raining (il pleut), it's snowing (il neige), it's nice today (il fait beau aujourd'hui), etc. The "it" refers to the weather.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Satoshi897124

I wrote "It will be sunny tomorrow". Isn't it the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2067

"Sunny" is certainly nice but it doesn't necessarily mean "sunny".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetBerry2

I thought the weather was fine not just nice It's actually fine and sunny but a little cold today


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TD56
  • 1042

We’re talking about wearher here, sooooo subjective, therefore , fine, sunny , nice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkHolden8

What happened to "it will be fine tomorrow"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenisBouch7

I understand that in England it refers to weather but in the US, "It will be fine tomorrow" may refer to many situations. I had an an argument at work today. "It will be fine tomorrow"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elaine365269

It will be fine tomorrow should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ex3mity

...and what about:

It will be sunny tomorrow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenisBouch7

If it was rejected, it would be worth reporting.

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