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Spanish Expression Proverbs

0liwia
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Hola querridos amigos estudiantes de español,

In my ever desire to learn even more Spanish, I came across something that some may find interesting:

http://www.newsinslowspanish.com/catalog/spanish-expressions-proverbs/

It's a catalog of Spanish Expression proverbs. There must be like 200 of them. Each one has two dialogues you can listen to, and a short explanation in English of what it means in case you didn't understand the dialogues. Access to all the material is paid for but I find the free stuff enough to catch the meaning. The recordings are really slow and easy to understand.

I also use Anki to write down and review each proverb.

Yet another resources for my thirst for knowledge!

PS: There seems to be grammar lessons too, but I didn't try them out.

4 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/n.gratton
n.gratton
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I've seen books with expressions too; what I've found unhelpful is that they don't tend to tell you how frequent the expressions are (in different regions), and examples of how they may fit into sentences. So, it's good to see that site shows context, even if it doesn't express frequency or regionality.

Some I've heard or read in real life:

"Me estás tomando el pelo" = "You're pulling my leg" / "You're having a joke with me".

"Me importa un bledo"/ "No me importa un bledo" = "No me importa"

"Por si las moscas" = "Por si acaso"

"Un gato" = "Un madrileño", someone from Madrid.

"Eres de Madrid?" = "Were you born in a barn?" (Said when someone leaves the door wide open).

"Cuatro gatos" = "Casi nadie", only a handful of people.

"Estar en la luna" = "To be away with the fairies", to be day-dreaming or spaced out.

"Me aburro como una ostra" = "Estoy totalmente aburrido".

"Es un rollo repollo" (I read this in manolito gafotas, several times)" = "It's a total drag". (You can just use "Es un rollo")

"Piel de gallina" = "Goosebumps"

"Hecho polvo" = Cansadísimo.

"Me siento plof" / "Estoy plof" = I feel lethargic.

"Uffffffffffff" = expression that rolls any or all of "OMG", "I can't believe it", and "that's awful" into one syllable.

These were all from Spain; can any natives or long-term learners in HIspanoamerica comment on which of these exist over there? (I guess the Madrid-related couple don't).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
0liwia
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Thanks, it's kind of difficult indeed to know which one shall be useful to learn!

I've learned most of the ones you cited on Babbel, but there are very limited examples of how to use them. I did like a lot the idea of explaining when and how to use them, not just translating them, but the speed of the recordings make me fall asleep out of boredom -_- ;-) Btw, babbel also has some really good content regarding colloquial speech - which you probably already master as you've lived in Spain, but still! I spent a lot of time wondering if Spaniards really say "fin de semana" every time they talk about the week end... Turns out "finde" does the trick too ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n.gratton
n.gratton
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Yes, they use 'unofficial' abbreviations a lot; the that spring to mind are "finde" of course, "boli" (bolígrafo) and "peli" (película), and "porfa" (for 'por favor'). Obviously these aren't used in formal settings.

Related to 'finde', 'Puente' is a good expression that we don't have in English; the closest is 'long weekend'. A public holiday occurs on a Tuesday or Thursday, people will take the Monday or Friday off to make a 4-day weekend; that's a 'puente' (because they bridge the public holiday to the weekend). http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puente_festivo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
0liwia
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:-) it's called 'pont" in French, which means bridge as well... That has got to be a cultural similitude! -> French are known for their huge amount of holidays and "bridges"; however, a French friend of mine who lives in Madrid told me he summed up all holidays and public holidays and it turns out Spaniards have just as many "free" days as French do...

How would you say "take the bridge days" in Spanish? Hacer el puente? Tomar el puente? In French it's "faire le pont" ie "hacer el puente".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n.gratton
n.gratton
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Just "hacer puente".

"Es el día de la constitución el martes. Hacemos puente el lunes?"

4 years ago