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  5. "Да , доброе утро."

"Да , доброе утро."

Translation:Yes, good morning.

November 4, 2015

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sannehoo

What is the "yes" or "yup" doing here? Isn't this a very strange sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HobsonAna

I am confused about this too. Is it sort of like saying "Good morning to you too"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nardoel

I think it is a perfecly normal duo sentence :) And yes, good morning!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randonneur3

Agree. There is repetition, or redundancy. But this 'greeting' is in several other Duo languages too. Sometimes as a farewell, as Thanks, good morning. I do not say that either!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Romain-D

Hi!

Why Да here is "Yup" and not "Yes"? Also, are there different ways to say "yes" in Russian, just like there are "yeah", "yep", etc. in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YaPrGa

There is only one way to say yes - that would be да


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/k-m-y

The second way to say "yes" is ага́ (informal) or угу́ (informal, with a touch of sadness).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nardoel

And why should one say 'Да, доброе утро'? Is this a normal way of saying good morning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

So in these sentences is the ending of добр- changing to agree with the gender of morning/afternoon/night etc?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MenyaZovutMegan

Yes, it is. утро is neuter, день and вечер are both masculine. The feminine version of добрый is добрая.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/huttenruhe

Is добрый the 'regular' version? E.g. If I simply wanted to say "Good.", I'd have to say "добрый", and not any other version of the word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MenyaZovutMegan

I believe one would use "хорошо" for "good" in that manner, though I am not a native speaker. My Russian teacher would use "хорошо" as a compliment when we did something well. добрый I think translates more directly as "kind" or "nice". Other than these greetings, it is used to describe people ("He's a good/nice guy"). Maybe a native speaker on here can help clarify?

Russian dictionaries present adjectives in their masculine form, so you would see "добрый" listed in bold.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillEverett

In my experience, "Добрый" is a common response to "Добрый день" or "Добрый вечер".

I used to greet my young children in the morning with "Добрая утка!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

Great, many thanks for the explanation - I guess I'm going to learn about this in a few lessons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soharayan

Menya are from Russa? can you teach me also to how speek in Russa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Misakachi

I would like to know as well!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albantar

Why is it «добрый день» but «доброе утро»?

[edit] Ah, it has to do with the gender of the noun... :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elijah538219

хорошо sounds like horror show.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomer_K

How can I phonetically tell the difference between Доброе and Добрый?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kerry251601

Can I just say доброе ночи for good night the way its used for good morning (доброе утро) instead of saying спокоинои ночи?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarinaKaleneva

Yes, you can say "доброй ночи" (just not "доброе ночи", "доброе" is neutral and "ночь" is feminine).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nardoel

Why not добрая ночь? Apparently Доброе утро and добрый день are both nominatives or accusatives, but спокойной ночх seems to be a genitive. Why the different case ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablopublico

утро: From Proto-Slavic *(j)utro (“morning, dawn”). From Proto-Balto-Slavic *auš(t)ra- (“dawn, morning”), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ews-ro- (“of the dawn or morning, matutinal; eastern”), from *h₂ews- (“dawn; east”). Baltic cognates include Lithuanian aušrà, dial. auštrà (“dawn”), Latvian àustra, aũstra (“dawn”). Indo-European cognates include Ancient Greek αὔρᾱ (aúrā, “(esp. cool) breeze, fresh air of the morning”), Latin auster (“south wind”), Proto-Germanic *austrą (“east”), Proto-Germanic *Austrǭ (“Easter, springtime; name of a goddess” hence "East") (presumably from the goddess of the dawn, lust, fertility and spring, associated with the beginning of the year).

A variant *jutro appears in West Slavic, Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian, and is also attested in Old Church Slavonic, but considered secondary; there are further Slavic lexemes that display an alternation *ju- in West and South Slavic vs. *u- in East Slavic. Variants with *(j)ustr- point to *ustr- < *usr-,[1] the loss of -s- being either due to dissimilation[2] or perhaps due to the law of open syllables, if the -s- was variably assigned to the end of the first syllable. According to Kortlandt, the acute on the root implies a zero-grade variant (which would have parallels in Sanskrit उस्र (usrá-, “reddish, ruddy, bright, matutinal”), उस्रा (usrā́-, “dawn, morning”)), which, however, is not attested.[3] The intrusive -t- is regular in Proto-Slavic, compare *ostrъ, *strumy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry69934

Is a "yes" necessary before a "good morning"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E-chan.

Not at all


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pabblo701663

Wtf i just learned how to spell добрый and now it changes the spelling?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FilipeFlor6

This one just doesn't work for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KokichiOuma200

Sometimes when i press "yes" or any other word it doesnt work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielGran17

It's not grammatically wrong at all.

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