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  5. "Han har flotte lærere."

"Han har flotte lærere."

Translation:He has great teachers.

November 4, 2015

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derpkins

Lol in Danish 'flot' means like handsome or beautiful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorun-la

"Flott" can also mean 'cute' or similar words, but it's not appropriate in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derpkins

I figured as much. It was just a thing that popped into my head. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amidion12

Why isn't it lærerer...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grydolva

Several Norwegian nouns end in -er in the singular indefinite form, and they just get an -e in plural. Too many "erer" or "enene" just becomes confusing, I guess.


[deactivated user]

    That doesn't stop them from words like "universitetet".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nana808630

    Or "tallerkenene" ☺


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bertsta

    I always make the joke to my missus about the tallerkenenenenenenene cause it sounds funny. She is a translator so it kinda works out.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/takenspark

    I think it's because you insert an -e on "flotte" that the noun no longer needs to be in plural form. Duolingo's tips specify this i think


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBennett6

    He's = he has, but only when "has" is an auxiliary verb and not when it's a main verb. (apart from in dialects like in Irish English). Duo can't tell these two contexts apart - it happens in the other language courses as well when Duo generates "correct" or "alternative" answers.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Panthera4

    "He's great teachers"? Because that's how it corrected me and I don't see any sense in it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grydolva

    You can write "he has" as he's. As well as "he is" = he's. He's great at teaching. He's got a great teacher.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bridget231515

    Contractions aside, "he's great teachers." Still doesn't make grammatical sense. Perhaps is meat to say "he has great teachers"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grydolva

    "He has great teachers" is the preferred answer. It is allowed within English grammar to contract "he has" to "he's" as far as I know, that's why it is added as an alternative.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neemel

    I believe that in most parts of the English-speaking world "He has a great teacher" would not be shortened to "He's a great teacher" partly because most people would understand the latter as "He is a great teacher". But I suppose there are areas in the world (UK?) where this is OK. Otherwise shortening "he has" to "he's" when followed by a past participle as in "he's been a great teacher" is normal. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

    No, we can't shorten "he has" to "he's" in the UK, or anywhere that I know of (unless we say "he's got"). I believe the accepted contractions are automatically generated and this is a glitch in how it works. Certainly that's the case in the Russian course.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHarr347673

    Not really. Personally, he's tends to mean he is (i'm from uk lol). As mentioned, the only exceptions to the rule are predominantly past tense contractions. S/ He's eaten, sang, slept, washed, rode, written, drank etc... If you followed he's by "got" it would make more sense. He's got great teachers etc...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akurzias

    I think it is more acceptable is certain situations like "He's eaten" which would be understood as "he has eaten". I don't think that "he's" is appropriate in "He's great teachers", that would universally be understood where I live as "He is".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mwaltari

    must be corrected


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grydolva

    "He's great teachers" is not one of our manually entered alternatives. So if this still shows up it is because it is a part of the language base. Something I think we can't alter...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samstubbs03

    Would the definitive plural of teachers be lærerere? How would you pronounce that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob714029

    Why does this sound like it is saying "lar-de-da"? Where are the D sounds coming from?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBennett6

    A "tapped r" is made by touching the tongue at the same point that is used for "d" - the contact is just less firm. The two sounds are very similar. If context leads you to expect a "tapped r", you'll hear "r", but without context or without previously knowing the word, it's totally reasonable to interpret the sound as a "d".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christinaaalvik

    Flot in norwegian means good looking, not great !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/51Danielle

    When do you use flotte vs. gode? I think it accepted gode, so what's the difference?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christinaaalvik

    "Flotte" means good looking, "gode" means good (clever)

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