https://www.duolingo.com/alephhaz

Pronunciation of у

Hi all,

I noticed in the notes section of the first lesson that it's mentioned that у is spelt like the [oo] in book. I'm fairly sure most English speakers pronounce this as an "uh" sound, like the [u] in "tuck" or the [oo] in "took" or "look".

As far as I've learned, у is pronounced more like the [oo] in "food", which is "longer" than the previously mentioned sound. Unless my understanding is wrong. :S

I'm hoping someone could either elaborate, or that I can contribute to a correction of the notes. :D

Harry

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tamuna10
Tamuna10
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It's rather short than long, none of the Russian letters are too long. :) Look here: http://forvo.com/word/%D1%83/#ru

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Captain000

+1 to forvo. Like CallHimDuddle said; Утро is a good word for listing to this sound. The утро here is exaggerated a bit, but shows how the У should sound. http://forvo.com/word/утро/#ru you will need to copy and paste the link for some reason as only part of it is clickable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuddC

I think of it in terms of the word «Утро», as I think that demonstrates the letter pronunciation very well. Google Translate's spoken button says that word fairly well, so I'd suggest using that as an indication on how the letter is said. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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I am a native Russian speaker, and I can't tell the difference between "oo" in "took", "look" and "food"... well... maybe "food" is a little longer, but to my Russian ear this is really an insignificant subtlety. And does not "tuck" sound with an "ah" sound? Like in "fun"?

I'd suggest listening to native speakers to learn proper pronunciation. Forvo.com is a great resource when you want to hear a specific word. I can't think of an English sound that is exactly the same as Russian У. Books and looks are fine to give you a start.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alephhaz

Hey :) You're right - I might be being a bit pedantic. The difference just sounds like a big one to me, but a foreign speaker will probably still be understood.

To me, "took" and "tuck" sound exactly the same, but apparently there is a very small difference according to some dictionaries. Maybe it's my particular accent. Maybe phonology is weird. >_< It's obviously a lot more complicated. I like that I'm learning things about my own language (as well as just Russian) as time goes on.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/draquila

To me they are definitely different. "Book" and "food" differ in more than just length as well; the latter vowel has rounded lips.

"Tuck" and "fun" do not have an ah sound (as in father) but it is very similar.

However, English vowels have immense variety between dialects, which makes these sorts of discussions mostly pointless. For example, in my dialect "pin" and "pen" are completely different but in some they are identical. The same is true of "ferry" and "fairy." On the other hand, in my dialect "cot" and "caught" are identical, but in some they are different.

English phonemes are weird.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vytah
vytah
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Are you from Northern England? Because it's a feature of most Northern dialects to pronounce tuck and took the same (hence it's called Oop North).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goldbedr

Many americans will say took and look a lot softer on the vowels. Look can almost sound like "luck". However, "food" never really sounds like "fud".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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I understand the sounds are different for native speakers, but we Russians use to roughly match English sounds with Russian ones. So I hear "oo" in "food" or "book" or "put" like a version of У. U in "fun", A in "father", O in "mother" are versions of А for me. Yes, they are different (and I'm sure I pronounce them much better now than when I learned them initially), but still I think of them as kinds of У and А :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alex_tv80
alex_tv80
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It may depend on wether the syllable is stressed or not. Stressed vowels sound a bit longer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skaarup75
skaarup75
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This is one of those occasions where not being an english native pays off. In most of Europe the russian У corresponds to a U - except for France of course :-) (There are surely more exceptions, but i think it's a good rule)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vytah
vytah
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According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_phonology у is pronounced (assuming Standard American accent or Received Pronunciation):

  • oo in food if stressed

  • oo in book if not stressed

Either way, Russian vowels are always short.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alephhaz

Thanks for the link - I agree that it sounds like the [oo] in "boot". However, this doesn't sound at all like the [oo] in "book", I believe this particular sound is the following (same as [oo] in "foot"):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near-close_near-back_vowel

Thus I believe these are different sounds and that the example word is incorrect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windrammer
Windrammer
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It seems like y is pronounced like ʊ in some instances when it is not emphasized, and u otherwise.

3 years ago
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