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  5. "У Дженни есть тарелка."

"У Дженни есть тарелка."

Translation:Jenny has a plate.

November 4, 2015

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirTobyBelch

What purpose does "У" serve here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dutchie451165

It means that it's something of jenny's. Without it, it be "jenny is a plate".. Horror!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tenhobi

So

... есть = ... is

У ... есть = ... has/have

? :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevie_Z

Correct; У [name] есть [noun.] is showing possession of an item. [name] есть [noun.] is saying they are the noun.

:-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leonardo_ferrari

Also, after "y" you need to use genitive...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaydnAllbutt

Can I ask what you mean by this (or someone else, I realise this is an old comment)? What is a genitive in this example, ie how would one use it after the "y"? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gibbett

Genitive is kind of like possessive, as in, who or what the object belongs to (or where it comes from etc.). In English there are requirements as to where words are placed in a sentence for their meaning, but Russian word order is almost completely fluid, meaning that nouns are essentially conjugated to tell what purpose they have in a sentence.

There are six different cases that tell what properties or attributes a noun has or what question it answers, and you can read all about it here: https://www.thoughtco.com/russian-cases-4768614


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VkadLol

Also есть - to eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VHAZVLL

You made my day.... Hahahaaha...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vetle.Reinton

That both helped me alot, and made me laugh so hard. Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PieishmanP

Literally "By Jenny there is a plate." To say someone has something in Russian, you say it is by them or with them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shalshelet

I wonder if "To Jenny . . ." showing possessive could also apply here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeninMage

More Russian names would make sense here. If I'm in Russia, I won't likely be talking about Jenny's plate. Just saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

Jenny is here to teach you reading: a familiar name written in Cyrillic. Later on, there are Вера, Дима, Иван Иванович and so on :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chucklenuts7

Do we ever get to see Владимир Владимирович?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pahichilla

His name is Вова.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgoraAkbar

The issue is when they include this as a listening exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john.newbe

It's also a Duolingo special. ......you call it a curve ball in the US!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

I'm a bit confused by the pronunciation of тарелка - it looks like it should be tar-yel-ka but the actual pronunciation sounds like tar-i-yolka. Can anyone help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juliana200200

the correct pronunciation is тарёлка but in modern Russian almost no one uses ё to write, they use е for both sound "io" and for sound "ie" since the natives know the words and know what sound corresponds


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fabnoeli

I regularly check pronunciation with google translate or a learning russian website because i have suspected some were off. My intuition has usually been right and i get pronunciations closer to what i think it should be


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shalshelet

I hear tar-(y)il-ka.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeniaHwa

maybe it's because I'm russian, but i clearly hear tar-el-ka, it's just "r" is soft


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orco-Gregorio

But Jenny got a gun, not a plate!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin135869

That one was Джейни not Дженни.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/monica67

I just discovered these comments and I'm so glad! Now i know i have a place to ask questions. The explanation of the use of the "y" was so helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akuhime-sama

What is the best way to remember this usage of "есть" as "has" instead of "eating"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo

есть is the verb "to be" and the soft sign at the end of the word can remind you of a B. So: To Jenny there is a plate =Jenny has a plate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akuhime-sama

Yeah, I already know about the soft sign, but that doesn't help me on how to separate it from the word that means to eat or is eating. But thanks for your input anyway ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorGrayMoore

"Jenny" is completely garbled for me to the point it isn't recognizable as such whatsoever unless I slow it down. Even after going on to later lessons and listening back, I still can't believe that's whats being said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davishiro

So, the "J" letter is spelled: 'дж'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ingrida54664

Why use English name in Russian practice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgoraAkbar

I don't think a sentence with a foreign proper noun fits the listening exercises. The robot pronunciation is sketchy and the names will not be that common in real life anyway.

If you want to use proper nouns, why not Vladimir, Ivan, Svetlana, and the likes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KelbeyW

Isn't this the acusative??? What is from Jenny, the plate. So: У Дйенни есть тапелку?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

Nope, it is nominative. "Тарелка" is the subject of the Russian sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anothernobody

When do we use "ест" (with no "ь")?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pahichilla

У Дженни есть ствол.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moonshprot

Ты почему такой жестокий? Дженни тебе что, киллер? :DD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael496169

У Дженни есть тарелка. Дженни - сервант с посудой.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo

Is Дженни declined or do foreign names always remain in the nominative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

Дженни is not declinable. Foreign names are treated differently depending on their type:

  • Female names like Maria, Cinderella, Theresa (usually ending with "a") are declined like Russian female words.
  • Male names like John, Tom, Alexander, Joseph, Michael (usually ending with a consonant) are declined like Russian male words.
  • Female and male names like Jenny, Billy, Timothy, Mary (ending with Y), Ann, Elizabeth, Jane (female names ending with a consonant or a consonant sound) are not declined.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kashwaa

I wrote "The jenny has a plate", why is this wrong? And, could anybody explain to me how to differenciate -in Russian- between these senteces: 1- "The jenny has a plate" 2- "The jenny has the plate" 3- "A jenny has a plate" 4- "A jenny has the plate" These sentences have different meanings. How could I express that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

What is your native language? Jenny is a name, it does not require any article in English.

  • Jenny has the plate = Тарелка у Дженни
  • Jenny has a plate = У Дженни есть тарелка

Russian puts "known" things first and "new" things in the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kashwaa

Oh... an embarrassing mistake. I thought that they were talking about a goblin :D And yes, English isn't my mother tongue, and the name Jenny is not from my culture. Thank you very much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/intuit214

You mean, like a genie/djinni? :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solidgitarius

I dream of Jeannie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ej253

I'm a little confused about using est, and est'. How do you differentiate between when one has something, and when one is eating something? I just noticed in this lesson that earlier " est " meant eating, and now in this context " est' " means she has a plate. So is that how to tell the two apart? When " est " is by itself, it means to eat, and if it has " ' " at the end, it means to have?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ricardo356686

They are two diferent words (verbs), with diferent spellings and diferent meanings: ест= "еат" and есть" = " has/have" with "у" and "is" without it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A477

So this means there is actually a word "to be" in russian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gianfi992

/Est/ is the verb to eat .. /est'/ is used here to express possession ( u menja est'..) it is the verb to be? True ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onalga

Why is this sentence in this course? I thought we learned this a long time ago? There is no accusative here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Link102183

Is the name "Jenny" very common in the Russian culture?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natalia302555

Женя is a nickname for Евгений and for Евгения


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitri225458

It would be helpful to introduce names first or/and mark them as such. This is confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyler557972

I have heard the Russian name Jenny spelled like Джений and decided to type it like that as it stated it wrong. Is it required all Jenny's names are spelled like that instead of what I have written?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malawelekaahm

Джений looks like a male version of Дженни


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maksim-Sme

It has problems recognizing the soft sign. Voice recognition


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValentinSe14370

I heard дженя and not Дженни


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natalia302555

Женя. No "D" . ☺


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arturo.Pablo

Why not тарелку? Is not тарелка the direct object of есть? Why not decline it in the accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suhanoves

it is a possessive form. you should use next rules:

+: "У" + "Genitive Pronoun" + "есть" + "Nominative case noun". У меня есть тарелка; У тебя есть кошка; У нас есть стол

-: "У" + "Genitive Pronoun" + "нет" + "Genitive case noun" У меня нет тарелки; У тебя нет кошки; У нас нет стола


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emrick221888

How is "jenny" pronounced in the sentence the was it is at the beggining when it starts with "Лж"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cardoso165

Watch out, she's got a plate!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/11g8E5

Почему has а не have?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natalia302555

He/she/ it - use has instead of have


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PccnnDioBrando

The audio did not came out


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OhWowBro

I hear that the "ь" is a soft sign, but how does it work? Because I can't hear a difference between "есть" and "ест". I'm trying to hear the difference, because I heard that there is one. But, I just can't hear it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris837255

Why doesn't it translate to "does jenny have a plate?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malawelekaahm

Because "У Дженни есть тарелка." is not a question, it's a statement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseJcc137

So basically this is not acusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malawelekaahm

У Subject (кого? чего? — genitive case) есть Object (кто? что? — nominative case). But: У Subject (кого? чего?) нет Object (кого? чего? — genitive case). У Дженни есть тарелка, but У Дженни нет тарелки, Jenny don't have a plate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroPupsik

How do I know when the person is asking instead of giving an affirmation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CameronVillers

Does тарелка have the same root as German Teller and Swedish tallrik?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouseGrouse

GET DOWN SHE'S GOT A PLATE


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/REMI622865

I was totally confused too; The gun references are apparently in relation to a crappy song.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WinstonCha11

"тарелка" coild not be heard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabriel125282

Cadê os br, poha??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReverendWinfield

WHAT DID HER DADDY DOOO...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulkaRujko

Nechce mi uznať slovensky napísané , niekedy to blbne :P

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