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  5. "Что не так?"

"Что не так?"

Translation:What is wrong?

November 4, 2015

98 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/212498873

<h1>ЧТО НЕ ТАК?</h1>

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninolf

The escalator is really just stairs .cool


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/212498873

Эскалатор - смешной : )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/delondir

тогда уж должно быть "смешной эскалатор"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HugoAllexis

I wish there was a section for useful and a section for funny comments... Don't get me wrong, I laughed at this but is not what I came to read the comments for haha... Now I got distracted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beingfollowed

Can someone explain me the individual translation of "Tak"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olga451165

Like that. In this case it's more of a slang type of thing.. Like what isn't as it supposed to be


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rekty

What about Ты так круто? It's You are so awesome, I think, no? So the main translations of так are like that and so, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olga451165

Both..but it'd be "ti takoi krutoy" or "ti takaya krutaya"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rekty

I guess I will learn it in future lessons, but why так is linked to круто? And also why круто is not simply in a nominative form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olga451165

in the that context it's used for "so", but you can say "you are cool" as "ti krutoy", you don't have to add the "tak" there.

as an adjective you always change the form a little bit, for example : "ti bal'shOY", "ti haroshIY", "ti krasivIY". so same with "krutOY". think of it as compensation for the lack of "are", without it it's "you cool".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

It IS in the Nominative, in masculine – as an adjective. I believe круто is an adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

I can't say I am an expert on Russian, but shortening an adjective by 1 sound круто́й → круто́ doesn't seem likely, especially when it looks like a regular adverb.

I think Jenkiz92 that it might be interference from your native language that compels you to think so. For instance, in English/French you say that something “smells good”, and not that it “smells well“. In Slavic, you have to use an adverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenkiz92

As far as i know круто is adjective too, but the short form of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeFolsom

so it's similar to "asi" in spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rekty

If you say something like this, yes: зачем ты так? = Porque eres asi? = Why are you like that?

But remember it can also be used for so, which in spanish is tan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ns_shadow

Since "ты" has masculine or feminine gender, so the right short form of the adjective is "крут" or "крута". "Ты так крут!" "Ты так крута!" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kinsella7

Yeah, my first translation was "What's not like that?" Which, of course doesn't make any sense. But still.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rugenam

That is the exact translation, but of course in english it doesn't have the same meaning. In russian it basically means "What's not right?" => "What's wrong?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhysicsBecky

In Polish (another Slavic language) "tak" means yes or right/correct. If it has a similar meaning in Russian, the question would literally translate to "What's not right?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kev4italy

Yeah in Ukrainian так is also yes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rekty

Here a link that will show you many examples and translations of the word: http://masterrussian.com/vocabulary/tak_so.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvDr2g

For now I would like to think of it as something like "right" so that the "wrong" translates to "not right" in my mind. Donno if I am going in the right direction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7rrF10

Так=[t/\k]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

The Tips & Notes at the beginning of the unit say the following:

"Negative questions give a shade of "by any chance": «Извини́те, вы не зна́ете Михаи́ла?» = Excuse me, do you happen to know Mikhail?"

Because of this, I guessed at this sentence with "What happens to be wrong?" Needless to say, what happened to be wrong was my guess. lol. =P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madame-patate

Well the tips and notes mostly said that to illustrate the "please"-"извините", and explain in which context it is used - so the mental link was irrelevant here :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madame-patate

Plus, this is not a negative question ! If you translate it in a barbarian but somehow correct way, "Tak" would (in this sentence) mean "as usual" or "as it should be". Which makes the question "What's not as it should be ?" - and in English you prefer to say "What's wrong" though it's the exact same meaning. A negative question is when you expect to get a "No." for answer and you express it in the request. Like they did with "do you happen to know Mikhail" or like - I don't know if it's correct in English but we have this in French - "Couldn't you get out of your room", "couldn't you-", "wouldn't you-" and so on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

You can do this in English, but that's not very natural. This is a rather specific construction that I have observed especially in French and Russian (perhaps Ukrainian as well).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madame-patate

I'll remember it. thanks ! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

"What is not as it should be" is certainly a negative question. Neither the expected response (if there is an expected response at all) nor the actually received response have anything to do with the positivity/negativity of a question. What you're describing is a negative answer, not a negative question. The English sentence "do you happen to know Mikhail" is not a negative question, this is true. But the Russian sentence is. A more direct translation of it would be "do you not know Mikhail?" This is a negative question. Furthermore, the English question "do you happen to know Mikhail" does not necessarily expect a negative response, unlike your claim. There is no "expectation of a negative response being expressed in the request", to use your words. It is possible for the asker to expect a negative response, but that is by no means the case, necessarily, with this question. There is an equal probability (especially when removed from context) that the response may be a positive one. Therefore, they did no such thing as you claim with this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvDr2g

Um. Where do I find these tips and notes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Are you on a mobile? A few people copied the notes so you can see them on third-party sites:

http://duo-russian-grammar.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/

https://duonotes.fandom.com/wiki/Russian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hairai

can someone explain me why the letter ч , here sounds like s and on other words sounds like tch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csharpmajor

Что is pronounced like што. That's just how it is - it's one of the few phonetic inconsistencies in Russian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rekty

It does remain a sh or tch sound, not a s sound, though, from what you seem say?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csharpmajor

Yeah, but if you're expecting to hear "tch" you might misinterpret the sound as "s"... :)

Just as an additional note it's only in что that the ч is pronounced like ш, not any of the other inflections like чего or чем.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

How is that possible to confuse s with sh? This opposition is in most, if not all, European languages in one form or another 0_o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Probably because the Russian "sh" (ш) isn't a true "sh" in the English/German/otherwise European sense. It's an approximation (albeit, a close one). Russian ш actually doesn't exist in English. They're both voiceless sibilant fricatives, but the English "sh" is a postalveolar consonant (IPA [ʃ]), while the Russian "sh" is a retroflex consonant (IPA [ʂ]). While [ʂ] is technically closer to [ʃ] than it is to [s] (which is alveolar), all three of these sounds are liable to be confused by a speaker who isn't familiar with one or more of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csharpmajor

You perceive all sorts of crazy ❤❤❤❤ depending on what you're expecting to hear. All sounds are just a bunch of sine waves, after all.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McGurk_effect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

But then again, [ɕ] would be even closer to [s]. I understand new sounds are confusing, especially [ɕ] and [ʂ], but well, that was new :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

I am familliar with the effect, but I still consider this particular instance quite appaling… I submit it is possible, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ookamishi

What isn't wrong ? there is "ne" no ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

Actually, it says something along the lines of ”What is | not | right?”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/makiky

I'm an ultra beginner and just finding it very difficult to understand the phrasing and liaison between the consonants and vowels. Was this explained somewhere in the notes? It sounds like all of the words just run into each other and the letters morph into something completely different. Having a very had time the б в at the beginning of words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

There are weird things happening in the Russian ortography, just like in English, but I haven't noticed б (= b) or в (= v) sounds any different than they are supposed to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/franklinfranks

it's useful to also read through a beginners Russian textbook ... it will explain more about pronunciation rules and exceptions plus genders, cases, and declension etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HanaAlaa3

Okay when I was in Russia, people used to start the speech with "Tak.." and then say what they want, In this case what does "Tak" means?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KsanterX

It is the same when English speakers start their sentences with 'Ok' ('Ok, let me think' etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George_E_burns

What not such? What not so? I like the attempt at understanding the literal. It makes you appreciate their language and the way they speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaMegami

Im still confused on what TAK stands for...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donald135335

It is doubly confusing for someone in western Ukraine because in Ukrainian Tak means "yes". This is one of those words that is 90% contextual. You cannot take it out of context and say what it means.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hillerburton

Why is "Is that not so?" incorrect? How would that be said in Russian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

Because the word used there , что, means “what”, not “that”. You are probably thinking Это не так? or things like “indeed“: в самом деле, действительно, неужели etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

To be fair, the mouse-over hints do list "that" as a possible translation for что, which is likely how hillerburton came to that conclusion. I nearly made the same mistake myself. If it's an erroneous claim to say that что can be translated as "that", then it probably ought to be removed from the mouse-over hints.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ns_shadow

"Что" can mean different things, just like "that".

It can be a pronoun and translated as "what" (like in the upper sentence):

  • Что ты ешь? - What are you eating?
  • Я не знал, что сказать. - I didn't know what to say.

And "что" also can be a conjunction and in that case it's translated as "that":

  • Я думаю, что она красивая. - I think that she is beautiful.

And in that case the conjunction can be removed in both languages and the sentence keeps the meaning:

  • Я думаю, она красивая. - I think she is beauutiful.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mago1981

I think tak means "like that". This sentence should be translated "Is it not so?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Except that "Что" means "what" here, so it would be closer to "What is not so?" or "What is not like that?" which is more easily understood in English as "What is wrong?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mp233

As a croatian speaker i found my words and sentences similiar to russian. We also have phrase like that:" Što nije tako?//Zar nije tako?//" and the correct translation for that would be question:"Isn't that so?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galletadecolores

so так here means "wrong"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

It is the whole structure that gives the "wrong" meaning.

«Не» can be combined with some demonstrative pro-words beginning with a Т (так "so", там "there", тот "that", sometimes also with туда) to express the idea that the "wrong" object has been chosen instead of the "correct" one:

  • Это не тот офис! = That's the wrong office!
  • Ты не там ищешь. = You are looking in the wrong place.
  • Ты меня не так понял. = You misunderstood me.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quirkyandsuch

This would be a great subject for a Russian module on duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marisajshepard

So, what is the formal alternative to this expression?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Why would "What is wrong?" have a more formal alternative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenNilsson

Why is не here? Isn't that a negation of так, saying "What isn't wrong?" if not, is the phrase "что так" meaningful? If so, how do they differ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Так means "so, that way". It is a pronoun counterpart of "how". English is a bit of a mess in this respect in particular: "what" does relate to "that", "where" to "there", and "when" to "then" but "how" does not produce "thow" (you use "so", "like that" or "in that way" instead).

Не так ("not so") is an idiomatic combination to express that something is "off". Similarly, if you want to say that something picked the wrong object, you can use не тот (e.g., "Ты взял не тот рюкзак"~"You took the wrong backpack").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DAVIDLAGUN9

Что плохо es válido?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donald135335

What is wrong with "What isn't so?" Since we don't have context, what is wring with a literal translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaMegami

Im still confused on what TAK stands for...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

Так basically means "so", although it's a little less obvious in this example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brizterians4life

how come "what is 'not right'?" is not a correct translation of this sentence according to duolingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DAN_6894

Why have the "not" in there? Why not just Chto tak? This is asking "what is NOT wrong"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It might help you to think of it as "What's not the way it should be?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/071g1

Всё отлично


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Polskaya

How do you say: what is not wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vylune3

why 'is something wrong?" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/franklinfranks

I think that would be 'что-то не так?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donrademac

'What's not right?' is a good, if less common translation than 'What's wrong?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/camporredonom

This sentence can be translated as "What's going on?"

Спасибо!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablopublico

так (tak) "so; like that; so much; just so; then; well; yes": From Old East Slavic тако (tako), такъ (takŭ), from Proto-Slavic *tako (adverb), from Proto-Slavic *takъ (adjective). Cognate with Ukrainian так (tak, "yes"), тако (tako); Belarusian так (tak); Bulgarian така (taka); Serbo-Croatian тако, так; Slovene tаkо, tàk; Czech and Polish tak ("yes"); Upper and Lower Sorbian tak; Lithuanian tóks ("such"), tokià; and Latin tālis ("such"). Akin to Old Church Slavonic pronoun тъ (tŭ).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XYZ1992

does this translate to "what's not like so"? I don't understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

Look at other comments, you have the response to that =]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XYZ1992

Ok I guess I am confused because Tak means too many things!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

Indeed it does, unfortunately ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ankakusi

Не means no...so why what is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kdammers

The slow version really sounds like kak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHANTAL156

I AM REALLY CONFUSED. I AM FRENCH. HOW CAN IT BE A POSITIVE QUESTION WITH не. I READ THE COMMENTS BELOW BUT I AM AFRAID IT HAS NOT HELPED ME. WHAT WOULD BE THE TRANSLATION OF ЧТО ТАК THEN ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rekty

Что не так? = Qu'est-ce qui ne va pas ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

That was so much neater than my explanation ;D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHANTAL156

Thank you LucasSherluck. Yes indeed in French we can say Qu'est ce qui ne va pas ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KsanterX

And that's what gets me every time when I learn French as a Russian native speaker:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iyoossaev

It's not a positive question. Not in Russian, anyway, but in English it is.

You have to understand that you are thinking of opposite meanings. For instance, you can either say « ce n'est pas bien », which is negative, or « C'est mal », which is positive. So you either use a positive word that you negate « pas bien », or u use a negative word « mal ». Another example to think of that is the difference between « non sûr/sécurisé » et « dangereux ».

Here English prefers to use a negative word “wrong”, where Russian uses something like « pas ainsi », « pas comme il faut », « non de la manière/façon correspodante ». I guess you could even make it like that in French: « Ne vas-ce pas bien? » (not sure if the word order is correct here).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHANTAL156

Thank you for this. Ne vas-ce pas bien ? is not French I am afraid. You could say ça ne va pas bien ?

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