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"твоё слово"

Translation:your word

November 4, 2015

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VorpalBunny

would 'Do I have your word?' be 'У меня есть твоё слово?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

Literally, yes. But if you ask about a promise, you'd say "Ты даёшь слово?", "Даёшь слово?" (you can drop the pronoun). Both mean "Do you give (your) word?" Or: "Обещаешь?" (Do you promise?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeremyBakke

you are a huge help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimidov

So I can't say or use "Слово" in the same way I'd use "Promise?" in English? Here, you conjugate the verb 'give' дать to go with it, after all.

And the other word is a conjugated verb as well, from the looks of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aguadopd

There are tips and notes for every lesson, but they are only visible in the web app. https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ru/Possessive-Modifiers-1

Tips and notes

POSSESSIVE ENEMY MINE

There isn't much to say about words like "my" or "your" in Russian.

his/her/their do not change: его́, её, их(and they don't get an initial Н after prepositions!)

my/your/our roughly follow an adjectival pattern, i.e. they copy the gender and the case of the noun they describe. Just like этот:

>>мой/твой/наш папа

>>моя́/твоя́/на́ша ма́ма

Unlike English, no distinction is made between my and mine, her and hers etc.

Pronunciation: in «его», as well as in adjective endings and "сегодня" the letter Г is pronounced В. It is a historical spelling.


GRAMMATICAL GENDER

Nouns in Russian belong to one of three genders: feminine, masculine or neuter. If a noun means a person of a certain gender, use that one. For all other nouns look at the end of the word:

(TABLE) ENDING IN NOM; GENDER; EXAMPLES

-а/-я ; feminine ; ма́ма, земля́, Росси́я, маши́на

consonant ; masculine ; сок, ма́льчик, чай, интерне́т, апельси́н

-о/-е ; neuter ; окно́, яйцо́, мо́ре

-ь ; feminine or masculine - consult a dictionary ; ло́шадь, ночь, мать, любо́вь / день, конь, медве́дь, учи́тель


IF THERE'S A SOFT SIGN, IT ISN'T POSSIBLE TO PREDICT THE GENDER, AT LEAST, NOT ACCURATELY. HOWEVER, ABOUT 65-70% OF THE MOST USED NOUNS THAT END IN -Ь ARE FEMININE. ALSO, YOU CAN LEARN THE COMMON SUFFIXES ENDING IN A SOFT SIGN THAT PRODUCE A WORD OF A PREDICTABLE GENDER. THEY ARE:

-ость/-есть, -знь → feminine

-тель, -арь, -ырь → masculine

ALL NOUNS WITH -ЧЬ, ЩЬ, -ШЬ, -ЖЬ AT THE END ARE FEMININE. THE CONVENTION IS TO SPELL FEMININE NOUNS WITH A SOFT SIGN AND MASCULINE ONES WITHOUT ONE: НОЖ, ЛУЧ, МУЖ, ДУШ. IT DOESN'T AFFECT PRONUNCIATION, ANYWAY.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TinCrow133

Russian is still in beta testing, be patient while the owls work out the kinks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morhow

So far I have seen 4 different russian words for Yours. What's the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

Russian pronouns are inflected for number, case, and gender. This means that masculine, feminine, and neuter words have different forms of "your" (eg, Твой Твоя Твоё in the nominative case) and that each of these changes according to its position in a sentence (ie, the nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, instrumental, prepositional cases). On top of that, there are different forms if multiple people are being addressed (ie, plural forms). This is comparable to French ton/votre or Swedish din/er. Look under "Russian Possessive Pronouns" in the link above to see the whole list of "my", "your", etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jannelies1

This is a very good answer, thank you, you've earned a lingot ;-) My problem is I don't understand grammar so I have to learn it all by reading and writing a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scribe_Matthew

Why isn't ''Твой'' ? - Thank you in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

"Слово" is neuter, so you have to use the neuter form "твоё".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

If you realise that й is a consonant then you'll see that consonant endings for nouns mean that the possessives have consonant endings too and vice versa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Maria_B._

Would this be used when you are doing a report with a witness or something, and you say, "can I just get your word on this"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

I wish the lessons were written using cyrillic orthography. They were up until a couple of lessons back, and suddenly they went back to transliteration. This is hard to figure out and at times leaves me confused about the correct spelling. It's funny: the lesson gives the task in the latin alphabet and I respond in cyrillic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VorpalBunny

There should be a little toggle in each lesson to switch from Cyrillic to romanization/transliteration. I still have that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

I had it in earlier .lessons, but it has disappeaed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

Looks like maybe they're doing A/B testing, because I can still see the toggle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Some people used to have it on the right, but it is on the top left.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam757201

When someone isn't paying attention in Scrabble


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HugoAllexis

Would this sentence mean like "it's your choice" in the context of discussing about a decision?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jabertcul

How is your/твоё different from your ваши и ваша how do you use it correctly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

Твой = informal, when speaking to a friend or close one. Ваш = formal, when addressing a stranger (unless it's like a 12 year old) or a group of 2 or more people.

They both decline based on the gender, number and case of the word they are modifying. Here the word is a single neuter word in nominative case, so it requires either твое or ваше. Both of those are acceptable answers, but they just imply that you're talking to two different types of audiences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThorGloey

Wait... слово - slovo Is that where the word slav comes from?

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