"мой читатель"

Translation:my reader

3 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Erik_Veloso
Erik_Veloso
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When I post a comment here all of you become my readers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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refuses to read this comment

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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What if you can only write, and never learned to read?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EGBJ89

Is that even possible?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Captain000

What does 'my reader' mean? I am a native English speaker and I have never heard someone say 'my reader' Is this an American term for a ebook reader or something? Or a term used to describer someone who reads for you? I wouldn't think anyone would have a reader unless they are visually impaired and have someone specifically who reads for them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Читатель is a person. Do authors call people who read their works their readers? That's what this would mean.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
feyMorgaina
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Yes, in English an author or writer would call people who read their works "readers". :-)

A newspaper or magazine editor would also use the word as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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But if teachers hired people to narrate their lectures, they could also be called readers. When I first saw this word in Russian, I thought perhaps this was how Russian classrooms worked.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
northernguy
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Is is a sad day for an author who talks about his reader as if there is only one.

.....See, you didn't believe me when I told you someone reads my work. This is my reader right here. Now you can't deny I have a reader......

A more common use for reader in English is the kind of book intended to impart reading skills. Elementary schools sometimes refer to some of their books as readers. Lots of pictures, simple, unconnected words, not intended to be read as a book.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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It is not sad when an author addresses the reader as if there were only one. It is a common technique that creates a feeling of intimacy.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evelyn468953

How right you are, Dear Reader. Only, it is a bit sad that you are my sole and grammatically singular reader.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evelyn468953

True, but this is not a very common usage. The "readers" that I learned to read from were referred to as "reading books."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inguin-freyr
Inguin-freyr
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Ah, I thought it was like one of those Amazon Kindle E-readers ... You are right, this is far too ambiguous.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

So, can it also mean an e-reader, as lnguin-freyr mentioned? If not, what is the term for (e-)reader in Russian? I have yet to see a decisive yes/no vote on this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

An E-Book is apparently called электронная книга (which is a устройство). So unless someone (native or fluent) can verify that there is an informal word for it that is more like the reader here, I guess it's safer to go with электронная книга.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Everything I've found indicates электронная книга for both the book and the device. Apparently the device can also be called informally a "читалка"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

Спасибо, Theron! I hadn't managed to unearth that piece of information yet. It certainly seems to pop up relevant results on yandex.ru.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
zirkul
Mod
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FYI: "Читалка" is a word invented by Сим Симыч Карнавалов - a thinly veiled allusion to Solzhenitsyn in a satirical novel "Москва 2042" by Vladimir Voinovich: http://tinyurl.com/nyfe4k2
Сим Симыч is a russophile overly obsessed with the purity of Russian language. Hence he calls a newspaper "читалка" and a TV - "гляделка" (since the words used for them in Russian are clearly of foreign origin).

I, for one, am glad that a word, created as a parody, sprang to life; it indeed means an e-reader nowadays ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wublili
wublili
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"Our readers" is much more common term. Used, for example, on website when your are referring to your audience (the people who read the website).

"We'd like to thank our readers for blah blah blah..."

But yes, why could you not use "my readers" if you are the only person to work for the website (or if you have wrote a book, or whatever).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vanw39
vanw39
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Don't movie/television studios (or producers) have script readers?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IvyRoseMidwinter

"Доброе утро, уважаемые читатели." - that's how ngtz.ru sometimes addresses its readers. As a speaker of American English I don't find it all that odd, really, but maybe I've simply become accustomed to it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YOnoda
YOnoda
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I wish this sentence were to be constructed more clearly ; it is too simple to grasp the meaning (that's why I opened this discussion)...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Symji

what does it mean by "reader"? Like a textbook?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olga451165
Olga451165
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a person who is reading something ... like a blog readers/ my book readers

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piotrlatka
piotrlatka
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In Polish we have a word 'czytelnik'. It refers to a person who reads. Are these words related?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Yes, they are. I assume "czytelnik" is from "czytać", just as "читатель" is from "читать" - "czytać" and "читать" share the same origin.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piotrlatka
piotrlatka
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You are right, 'czytelnik' is derived form 'czytać'.

Thank you, now it's clear!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CHANTAL156

Is it really of use to beginners to learn this word ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Sure. It may not be the most common word, but it's not a rare one either, and it's a pattern you'll encounter quite often so it's good to be aware of: читать --> читатель, писать --> писатель, родить --> родитель and so forth.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CHANTAL156

THANK YOU THERON NOT EASY TO REMEMBER THIS WORD TOGETHER WITH TEACHER. INCIDENTALLY, I CHECKED THE WORD BLOOD IN TRANSLATE GOOGLE IT GIVES КРОВИ

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Yeah, teacher is another that follows the same pattern. If you can remember that учить is "to teach" and читать is "to read", you should be able to remember "reader" and "teacher".

Blood is "кровь" in nominative case, it does become "крови" in some other cases,

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CHANTAL156

Thank you again Theron. Useful comment (as usual!). Much appreciated

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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The discussion as to whether читатель can refer to the academic rank raises a further question for me: reader is also a rank in the ecclesiastical hierarchy of the Western church, constituting one of the minor orders. I believe that a "reader" is an ordained ministry within the Orthodox church also - is читатель also the correct term for this?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Чтец according to Wikipedia.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Reminds me of an old Morcambe and Wise joke: "I've had a letter from my fan..."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mel533776
Mel533776
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Whenever you no kidding have to decide an issue of Russian usage, always refer to Pushkin. Here's the argumentam ad Pushkinum:

Онегин, добрый мой приятель,

Родился на брегах Невы,

Где, может быть, родились вы

Или блистали, мой читатель;

Там некогда гулял и я:

Но вреден север для меня.

--Евгений Онегин, 1:II:9-14.

Here's my poor attempt at a translation:

"My good friend Onegin was born on the banks of the Neva (River), where perhaps you (also) were born or distinguished yourself, my reader. I strolled there for a while myself, but the north was bad for my health."

Pushkin really did write брегах for берегах, so the line would have the right number of syllables. According to Romanov, блистать literally means, "shine, beam." Even though we use the term in the same figurative way that Pushkin did, it didn't sound quite right there in English.

The "my reader" in the exercise brought this passage to mind. The term sounds fine to me in the singular. After all, a writer only ever has one reader at a time.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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A "reader" in English can also mean a person who reads something aloud to someone else who cannot read for any reason - usually by being blind or never having learned to read. There is a movie, "The Reader", in which a teenage boy has an affair with an older woman who cannot read, and she has him read to her as one of their activities. This is an adult film, but quite interesting due to plot twists.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arlen362222

-

11 months ago
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