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  5. "Нет, она не хочет пить."

"Нет, она не хочет пить."

Translation:No, she is not thirsty.

November 5, 2015

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LateBlt

I remember this is one weird thing about Russian: there is an adjective for "hungry" (голодный), but there is no usual word for "thirsty", so instead of saying someone is thirsty, you say "want to drink".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

...And instead of saying that someone is hungry you say "want to eat" or maybe "has grown hugry" (проголодался/проголодалась). Unless you are translating from English word-for-word or going for a rather disconnected and formal style;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr_Thu

So you usually don't say "я голоден" for eksample?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Usually not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoIlic

What is голоден/голодный used for?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllenTilley

Is there an audible difference between "она" and "Aнна"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Yes, of course. «Она» has the second syllable stressd, and only one «н».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stradaniye

I think what Igor means is that the consonant sound is also "doubled" in Анна, as in, you stop on it for an instant longer. Correct me if I'm wrong; I know this is a feature of Finnish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/japotillorjr

Correct translation is she does not want to drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MinskAlien

Is there a difference between wants to drink and wants a drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Technically, yes. What if I go to the counter and I want a drink for someone else? Then I could not always replace "I want a drink." with "I want to drink." if I don't want to drink, but I want a drink for someone else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Indra_Reaper

"to drink" refers to verb while "a drink" refers to noun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt92HUN

Is drink used to refer to alcoholic drinks in Russian too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2E3S

for any liquid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt92HUN

I mean, beside that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2E3S

I'm not aware of non-liquid alcoholic drinks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt92HUN

I mean, do they say "I want to have a drink" referring to alcohol?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2E3S

English speakers? They surely do. =) Russians say "Я хочу выпить" if they want an alcohol drink. "Нет, она не хочет пить." can also refer to alcohol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Does vodka jelly count? ;-) It's hardly a food, either...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daddylongleggs

Alcohol in a flash of light, like in parks and rec


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamehSameh9

Why "doesnt want to drink" doesnt accepted???!!!!!!!!!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarthaMore186825

The correct translation is she doent want to drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2kN12

"она не хочет пить" can that be translated as "she does not eant to drink" instead of "she is not thirsty"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJones273116

"No, she does not want a drink." - Would that be wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kravitz13

Why not Anna? It sounds similar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/victor739950

пить mean drink and not thirsty.....its a wrong translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/praemdonck

is it just me or пить (to drink) and петь (to sing) sound exactly the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aron_csoka

It is quite strange to read smth like that in Russian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ismail296331

It is not correct I think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamshidSobirov

'No, she does not want to drink' is correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tams59

That is what I put and it wasn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OldBoyan

"Анна" and "Она" sounds the same, I always pick wrong one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mactuary1

How about this sentence: "It's strange, I'm not thirsty/hungry, but I want to drink/eat."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erik355794

Why was "No, she does not want to drink" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohammadQu425151

Can you explain this question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DimitrieGr

Very peculiar in the Russian language. Thirsty = want to drink (хотеть пить) Hungry = want to eat (хотеть есть) Sleepy = want to sleep (хотеть спать) Especially the last one is confusing. One can be sleepy, but still doesn't want to lie down and sleep. (And maybe one can be hungry but doesn't want to eat while on a diet.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveIn207

France does. No "floppy disk."

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