"Доброе утро, Анна."

Translation:Good morning, Anna.

November 5, 2015

23 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedrOgle

Why is is Доброе and not Добрый?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ann666
  • 3440

You have three genders in Russian - masculin (Добрый), feminine (до́брая) and neuter (до́брое). And word " утро" is neuter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aguadopd

Спасибо. Доброе утро, АННА.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diogo8484

How about the pronunciations of Добрый, до́брое and до́брая?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ted_85

I don't know how to explain "ый" by typing it, but the neuter and feminine genders are pronounced as they are spelled. "до́брое" = "DO-brah-yeh" and "до́брая" = "DO-brah-yah". There's also "Доброй", which is used when saying "goodnight" to someone, before going to bed. "Доброй ночи" "DO-bry nochi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 946

Добрая and доброе are pronounced the same in the standard accent (or, at least, very, very close).

A voice talent doing station announcements may hypercorrect a tiny bit to make -ое different from -ая but this effect is rather subtle (it does not sound natural when the difference is large). I think, I heard an announcer making an unstressed -е of the ending more distinct, which lets the listener know that the station is, say, Солнечное, not Солнечная.

  • on the other hand, it is wise to consult the route map on the wall anyway... And I am sure stations that only differ in gender are nearly non-existent. I see no reason why one would have them on the same line.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitor445476

Wouldn't it be "спокойной ночи" instead of "Доброй ночи"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedrOgle

Ooh ok thanks! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sabbath_sun

Доброй ночи Анна, Can you tell me why 'o' sometimes sounds like 'a' in Russian. I really can't get it in my head. Is there any rule where pronunciation changes with the position of alphabets? Спасибо


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ted_85

An unstressed "о" is pronounced as "а", or maybe more like the English "uh" (as in "up") We do the same thing in English. If the syllable is unstressed, the vowel becomes diminished and sounds more like "uh".

The word "хорошо" is a good example. It's pronounced more like "харашо" because the last syllable is accented/stressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmosOnn

Compare "хорошая", which is pronounced like "харошая", because the stress is on the second syllable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ted_85

Да, точно.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ted_85

Большое спасибо!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmosOnn

I wrote Ana instead of Anna, I think this should be accepted as a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pietro460054

Interestingly, jutro in polish is tomorrow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naz495700

I speak bulgarian and as a person with a similar language I don't understand the difference between хорошо and доброе because in bulgarian there isn't a difference maybe ,but yeah why is it different ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B828321

Excuse me, but how can I get the cyrillic alphabet here so that I can answer in Russian? Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 946

Are you on a mobile device or on a desktop (laptop)?

Phones and tablets have languages and keyboards in input settings (something like Settings→System→Language anbd Input).

On Windows 10, go to Settings→Time&Language→Language→Add preferred languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LivingDeadGrrl

Доброе утро, Кларис.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacquelinann

Interesting about the ь


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuckyKhlover27

Im just curious why they use certain names rather than others? I know Dimitri (Dima) is like a Russian name but Anna, Tim, Tom why those?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 946

Anna is also a Russian name. I chose this one because it only has two different letters, one of which is exactly like the Latin letter. It is one of the most common Russian female names, along with Анастасия, Мария, Александра, Дарья, Юлия, Светлана, Ирина, Татьяна, Елена, and Екатерина. Too bad the TTS we used in 2015 was pretty bad for that word.

Tom and Tim are just short foreign names with familiar letters. Surely your name is not Ivan, Yekaterina, Vasiliy, Svetlana, Vladimir or Alyona? The logic behind Jenny was to 1. have a word with a [dʒ] so that we can teach ж and 2. have an indeclinable female name (useful because it is the same regardless of the case).

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