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  5. "Он не ест."

"Он не ест."

Translation:He does not eat.

November 5, 2015

98 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/protocactus_PC

Can this mean "He is not eating" as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/temporaril1

Can it mean, "he does not eat"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

So does Russian lack a progressive aspect, just like German? I don't understand why people have a hard time wrapping their minds around a lacking progressive aspect, so it's not a problem for me if it does. I just want to make sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

Yes, it does not have it. Be careful around the verbs of motion, though, because a repeated/multidirectional action and a progressive one-way action use different verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Okay, so while it doesn't have a progressive aspect, it does have an iterative aspect? That seems straight forward enough. Thanks. =) Though can you give me an example of a "multidirectional action", please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivaristal

Он плывёт = he is swimming (right now).

Он плавает — this can mean both "he is swimming (right now)" and "he swims (every day)"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

To be more exact, плывёт means motion in one direction, which mostly gets useful for actions in progress.

Плавает means motion in more than one direction. It may be used for:

  • repeated, habitual motion (these usually imply that you come back, then start it all over again)
  • round trips, especially when "I went to the park (and returned)" is close in meaning to "I was in the park"
  • motion without a goal. This can be progressive or habitual.
  • the name of the action itself: the ability to perform such action. For example, if someone cannot swim, it os «не умеет плавать».

Other verbs of motion behave like this, too. One verb for one-way motion, another for multidirectional motion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0x4790h

Is this true? Can someone confirm it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivaristal

I am NATIVE Russian. I was the BEST in Russian & literature at private language school and at linguistic college too. And I am a writer. Do you REALLY need more proofs?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brett476260

I'm just concerned with the whole not eating thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricojes

Food in the Soviet Union? Hah!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Demutrudu

Send him to the Gulag, He speaks of flaws in the Motherland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soasamuel

is the verb to be есть? it sounds similar to me..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

есть = to eat

есть = am/is/are (but only used in Russian in some cases like "У меня есть")

These words are homonymic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soasamuel

"У меня есть" Here's the importance of the 'spirit' within the Russian culture originally..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dempl

All other Slavs use it, but more in old epic songs rather than in everyday speech, or in some very specific cases. Russians just like to speak "Epicly" in everyday speech I suppose ;-) . Even saying hello, means "Be Well and Prosper!" :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soasamuel

That's exactly what I thought! perhaps in another context but I tend to believe there are French features of prolixity and verboseness acquired in the literature and arts during the 17th century,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

Why does не in this sentence sound like English "knee"? Shouldn't it be "neh" or "nyeh"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

Yes, I heard они ест. I was only able to tell it's он не, because the other sentence is ungrammatical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

It gets reduced because it's unstressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

So if е is unstressed, it sounds like ee?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

More like "i" in "lid". It is somewhere between the Russian Э and И, closer to И.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

So in this case we have imperfect TTS. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

The TTS sounds OK, pretty much the same as it would sound in speech. Russian vowels have quite a lot of variation: it is no wonder that an И-like sound between the palatalized Н and the Й of «ест» sounds as an almost perfect replica of И.

I tried analyzing a few different unstressed variations of И, and the one you hear in such environment is usually phonetically indistinguishable from a stressed И (if not for its reduced duration and power).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

OK, then I'm justified in saying that vowels with variation are a pain. :-) While we're talking about stress, are there any general rules as to where the stress is in a word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

It should not because «не» is almost never stressed (except не был, не было, не были).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

OK, thanks! Quick responses!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniloAustria

I get that е in не is not stressed, as the whole word is not stressed and therefore it is pronounced like the i in lid. But I was taught that in a one syllable verb the vowel is automatically stressed. Is that then simply not true? or is it like a rule as LucianoArthur suggested that both can't be stressed because the two е clash?

thank you in advance for the help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

Some words tend not to be stressed, among them prepositions and particles like не, ни, же, то, ведь, ли.

There are some preposition-noun combinations where the stress moves from the noun to the preposition (Он упал на́ пол) —some of these are historical, some are coined by analogy with historical stress patterns. The particle не gets stress in не́ был, не́ было, не́ были (but not не была́)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniloAustria

ok thank you very much for the explanation. so the same hold true for здесь then as well right? it simply is not stressed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

No, it isn't. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniloAustria

Because in the sentence "Я здесь." the audio pronounces the е unstressed. So I thought it might be the same :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

It doesn't. You may listen to its pronunciation in the course in this topic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniloAustria

I can't reply to your answer further below :D . That sentence is actually the one where I thought the е is pronounced unstressed. I guess I am just not used to Russian yet. I will get some more excercises under my belt and it should be fine. Thanks for your help and the fast replies, very appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DancingBanana

Could be traslated to: he doesn't eat??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griftrr

I put "они ect" they eat. Because thats what I heard. So how would you say they eat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

Они едят. The verb есть features a rather irregular conjugation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SageVaugha

USSR in a nutshell


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yanis667989

"he doesn't eat" not accepted...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Demutrudu

How far to the side will this go?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Demutrudu

Oop, That's the farthest you can go!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vlad_Lesnievski

Which way of saying "He does not eat" is more frequent in everyday life: "Он не ест" or "Он не кушает"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

It might depend on a person. I personally do not use кушать in generalised, non-human or non-familiar contexts—so, essentially, I would only ever use it to refer to someone I know having a particular meal. Some people, on the contrary, do not find sentences like "Я не кушаю мясо" or "Медведь может скушать собаку" odd. For me it would be «Виктор вегетарианец. Он не ест мясо.»

Note, however, that кушать is generally a much less common verb than есть. In the spoken subcorpus of Russian National Corpus forms of есть are 10 times as common as forms of кушать, with imperatives (e.g., "Кушай, конечно") being a bit less unfair but still in favour of есть. Ironically, it is old literature where you find it in buckets.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vlad_Lesnievski

Thank you very much for your thorough explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewRitt9

Delving into the psychology of language is an interesting arena of play.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbie0107

In normal audio you cannot here word Not- Не. You can hear in the slow recording though. Is it audio mistake or?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JadeFlame

I thought i heard они ест


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmanuelRisso

He made it sound like "Они ест," not "Он не ест."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AttilaGl12

Why is it не and not нет? Is there a rule for this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay110417

Can this also mean 'He won't eat' or only that he does not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

That essentially depends on whether "He doesn't eat" and "He won't eat" mean the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

What exactly do you mean by that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

The sentence in the title means that a person is not eating now (or maybe, does not eat in general in the time period we understand we are in).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vikipulka

No. He won't eat means Он не будет есть (in the future) He doesn't eat - он не есть (right now or he doesn't eat smth at all)

She doesn't dance -она не танцует she won't dance -она не будет танцевать (in the future)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qixyl

*Он не есТ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabinWright

Shouldn't "He eats not" be accepted as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c3230

Could you translate this as "Does he not eat?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThatHorseT

How come it is not "he is not eating?" Wouldn't that be correct? If it is, why is it like that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/21baisdk

would he did not eat also be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexis217645

No, because that is about the past. The Russian sentence is about the present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

It would not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RubenVela3

How come он is "he" but оне is "they"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

It is они (in modern Russian). What is so strange about basing "he", "she", "it" and "they" on the same word?

Old East Slavic did not have any third person pronouns. The modern он (она, оно) began as a repurposed demonstrative pronoun ("that"). This explains it, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartoszLec3

Fast speaker definitively says он ест


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edenyass

Does this mean "He is not eating" like right now? Or that he just doesn't eat? Like never? How do you know the difference between the two?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xerubium

It heards like они ест to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jungesluciano

When we have two 'e's in sequences, in different words, as in this phrase, are they always pronounced as "ee ye" like here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mayanchesna

I'm confused, ем and ест both mean 'eating', right? But how do I differentiate which to use in a situation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

It is about the same as differentiating between "am", "is", and "are", or "eats" and "eat. The difference is, Russian has forms for each combination of person and number.

to eat-present tense formsImgur

The conjugation itself is irregular (есть is one of the few such verbs), so do not pay much attention to the endings, except maybe the second column.

  • you'll have to memorise them in the end because they are unique for есть "eat" and дать "give" (OK, also создать). The rest of the verbs go люблю-любишь-любит or читаю-читаешь-читает in the singular.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olsen752449

When i can use verb кушать and ест?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aplatt2003

How unfortunate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceWreck

Why was "He doesn't eat" not acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomer_K

Sometimes I hear my Russian/Ukrainian friends say "Кущать" instead of "Ест". Is this a sort of slang word or just an alternative word for "Eat"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexis217645

According to this philologist кушать can only be appropriately used by women, about children. http://www.aif.ru/society/education/kushat_ili_est_kak_pravilno Apparently to use it about oneself gives one's speech "a strange tinge of self-deprecation...and solemn worship of self"! However the fact that a grammarian is writing on the topic suggests that, in practice, some people do use this word in ways she does not approve of...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sip9890

Don't and does not, aren't same!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clakscovsky

Well thats unhealthy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CesarMalac

This also sounds a bit like Oni est. duh! da ile net? ya prav?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

A bit. Maybe. Only the stress will not be the same. And the "N" sound is longer. Also, "oni yest" does not make any sense in Russian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harrycio

The verbs have any conjugation or remains the same in the present temp?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

Almost all Russian verbs have full conjugation in their non-past forms.

The verb "to be" is a notable exception—we only use as есть in the present tense (if we use it at all). It used to have the full paradigm (я есмь, ты еси, он есть.... они суть) but then the paradigm collapsed. In modern language we mainly use this verb for statements of existence rather than statements of identity, so, I guess, it makes sense that 3rd person singular is the only form left in use (even though it might have made sense to keep 3rd person plural, too, but it did not work out).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenBwer

He does not eat it should be acceptable also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc
Mod
  • 124

Really? Why?


[deactivated user]

    Stop with "ukraine"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaphaelPor10

    This sentence shows us that the russian people are the laziest people in the world, because some sentences can be spelled just with one word. Noice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewRitt9

    Perhaps, it is not laziness but efficiency?

    Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.