"Он думает, ты знаешь его брата."

Translation:He thinks you know his brother.

November 6, 2015

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Philip594452

Why is "brother" in the genitive in this sentence?

November 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

it is in the Accusative. Which is the same as Genitive. It happens for animate consonant-ending masculine nouns.

November 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72

And is the reason that "брат" is in the accusative because it is the object that is being 'known', yes?

Спасибо!

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

You are correct. The verb "знать" in Russian uses the direct object.

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877

According to:
https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Russian/Grammar/Accusative_case

Masculine nouns in the accusative case take nominative endings if they are inanimate and genitive endings if they are animate. In simple terms, for Masculine Accusative nouns, inanimate objects do not change their default ending, while such animated nouns either add -а or replace -й and -ь with -я.

August 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cherub721

Is there a rule about when you would need "что" to connect these clauses?

November 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

It is easier to give a few examples where you might omit is. After all, this is a short course if you compare it to the whole Russian language.

When making a positive statement starting with "думать", "говорить", "сказать" you can definitely omit "что" in colloquial speech. With "думаю" / "думаешь", / "думаете" you can even omit the pronoun and also form questions relatively easy:

  • Думаю, это его брат.

Omitting "что" won't work in negative sentences with these verbs:

  • Не думаю, что это его брат.
  • Нет, нет! Он не говорил, что экзамен завтра.

Can't think of more places where you can omit что right now.

November 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72

But at the same time, it is perfectly correct to include the "что", yes?

So for example, "Он думает что ты знаешь его брата".

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/johnny_MMX

конечно, без "ЧТО" это предложение звучит странновато

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ABEgorov

I don't think you can omit ЧТО here... Он думает, ты знаешь его брата = He thinks. You know his brother.

I can be wrong but I think the sentence should be:

Он думает, что ты знаешь его брата.

Он думает: ты знаешь его брата.

You can omit ЧТО when a sentence starts with "думаю" or "думаете" but you can't omit ЧТО when a sentence starts with "думает"...

March 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Mishutirus

Note: the pronunciation is wrong in this sentence. This is pronounced as an interrogative sentence, but it's an affirmative sentence, in fact. Anyway, I reported it.

December 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/johnny_MMX

согласен

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Royal1223

Yes

December 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/enryborto

What is the comma for? It doesn't seem to serve the purpose of separating concepts since it's in the middle of the sentence. Is it only for pronunciation/intonation purposes?

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

It separates clauses.

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneHorak

Is "г" a g sound or v sound?

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/obscure-memes

With «его» it makes a v sound

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RubyQuzy

I was curious if this sentence could have two interpretations? In one он and его represent the same person, and in the other, он and его represent two different people.

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

I wonder about the same thing. Does someone know?

April 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

Of course it has two.

April 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

Thanks :) There's no "of course", when you are learning a new language. In Finnish we have two different structures.

April 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/johnny_MMX

не совсем понятно, что вы имели в виду

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

What I meant is that for the two meanings RubyQuzy mentioned we have two different structures instead of just one that could mean both. So even if the ambiguity is obvious in Russian, it's not obvious linguistically, other options exist.

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/johnny_MMX

во всяком случае, в фразе "Он думает, ты знаешь его брата" всё совершенно однозначно

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

Это неправда. "Он" и "его", в принципе, могут относиться к разным людям, хотя это и не лучшее построение предложения (например, «Не-а, Дима не говорил мне его телефон. Он думает, ты знаешь его брата»). А могут и к одному.

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

Finnish is not an Indo-European language. There are structures where change of reference is expressed but it is not one of them.

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tkdjoe

May I ask why свой isn't used here? I thought you used that when the subject and possessor were the same person

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

Like Shady_arc said just below this thread, the subject of the sub clause is 'you' not 'he'. If you used своего here it would mean 'your brother' not 'his brother'.

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/tkdjoe

Ahhh, that makes sense, many thanks!

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/VincentvanZon

Is "своего брата" also possible in this case? Or maybe even preferable if the "he" and "his" are the same person?

October 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

своего refers to the subject of the clause, which would be ты in this case ("He thinks you know your brother").

October 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/VincentvanZon

Thanks!

October 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tatameansfire

I still dont know why we need to use the -а and the -у in the end of phrases and explanations are making me rrally confused. Coulsd someone try to explain it to me using examples please :(?

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BenNilsson

Why is there a comma in this sentence?

June 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Creamedeggs

Guys don't argue it's ok

November 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ArthurKock1

Is "его" genitive here, while "брата" is accusative? If yes, could we switch the word order to be "брата его"?

January 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordgnoebe

The brother who they talk about, is it of a third person? (not of 'он', and presumably not of 'ты' because that would be absurd.) Or can it also be the brother of он ?

March 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Soficca

What's up with those weird comas in the middle of sentences?

November 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

They separate clauses.

November 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cbn620

How come here it is думает and not думаю? I'm confused on the grammar.

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/knittingirl

Verb conjugation. думаю would be used with I, as in я думаю. думает is for the third person singular, so it can be used with он, она, or оно (he, she, or it) or any singular noun. I think there's a full conjugation table in the tips and notes section :)

November 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/urihalpern

Dear Igor . please take one Noun and write 6 sentences for that noun. Use a different case for each sentence. If a case can have multiple paths please write them all....I know its hard but it gotta help a lot of us..thanks uri halpern

November 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc

What is a path of a case exactly?

November 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Chatulov

Audio sounds more like question....

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/7otineb3

Listening to the sentence, I can hardly make out the words, even though I know them when the sentence is written in Russian.

June 13, 2018
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