"Ele freia o carro."

Translation:He slows the car.

November 21, 2013

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnni0

"he brakes the car"... do people say this? Sounds like "he breaks the car". I'd say "stop the car" or simply "I brake"...

November 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scraff

Duo's selection for me only gave "he slows the car" as an option. However I think the original "brakes" was more accurate (altho it could have been confused with smashing the car like you said!) because you can slow a car down using gears etc, whereas "freia" seems to specifically mean "to use the brakes". And im assuming you can "slow" a runner down using "Freia"? Any thoughts Paulo?

June 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes. "Freiar" means to come to inertia (if that's the correct word or thought). "Diminuir a velocidade" = to slow down.

  • Quebrar = to break (to cause damage)
June 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philip430350

No. You don't say come to inertia. And slowing down is not a matter of inertia. Inertia refers to the hiatus, the laborious period before the care gathers momentum.

August 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyrtonSmith

Yes, we say it regularly in motorsport. He brakes early into turn 3, maybe we can pass there," or "I'm braking too late."

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philip430350

There's nothing wrong with "brakes the car" Do people teally say it? Hardly. He applies the brakes is what a speaker of English would most likely say. I brake is great. Abd stop the car is what the joe average would say. Remember though that Duolingo is a more "artificial" setting for language learning.

August 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Idttiwef

The correct answer is he slows the car. That makes more sense, but Duo should've made the correct answer: he slows down the car

August 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrunoDalci1

I am sorry, friends, I am a native speaker of Brazilian Portuguese, and "ele freia o carro" means literally "he applies the brakes to the car". Obviously, when one brakes it, the car will slow down, but it is not a good TRANSLATION of the given sentence. Moreover, Duolingo DID accept the expression "hit the brakes" in a previous question, to translate exactly the same grammatical structure (even though I did not find it quite precise). As a side comment, some colleagues have produced comments which suggest they might be confusing the English verbs "to break" and "to brake"...

August 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jfiterre

Freia is also stops

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deborahcai

I think in this sentence "freia" is not just a verb but a "Phrasal Verb" which is "slow down" The car does not slow but it slows down.

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deborahcai

Sometimes direct translation doesn't always work. We have to get the cotext i guess. Just a thought.

October 19, 2018
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