"Утебяестьребёнок?"

Translation:Do you have a child?

3 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

Why do we use ребёнок for child, singular and детн for children, plural? These words do not resemble one another. Ребята seems to be the plural for the other child form. Is there a difference between that and дети?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

It is an irregular noun. Ребёнок - дети. Человек - люди. I guess they came from different stems.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

Thank you for taking the time to explain it to me! I can't respond beyond the last comment, so I'll just do it here. This may seem like irrelevant information at this point considering my low level, but it helps me a lot to know just which parts are 'don't think about this, just use it like that' and which parts are 'you should understand this'.

I appreciate the input and information. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

To my untrained eye, it would be more likely that the nouns ребёнок (s) - ребята (pl) are related, leaving me guessing as to the (s) form of детн (pl). I am uncertain how человек is related to my question? Unless that is somehow related to детн?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

Completely different words are used in singular and plural. The word ребёнок has no plural form (ребята may be related but the meanings are different). Дети (note: not детн) is only plural and has no singular form but parallels the meaning of ребёнок.

Olimo mentioned человек and люди because they are a similar pair - parallel meanings, but человек is only singular and люди is only plural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

I can accept that as something native speakers would simply know, but being so far removed from one, I'd appreciate if you could explain what what, exactly, the difference in meaning is between ребята and ребёнок. If that's possible, anyway. Nuance is hard to pin down, I'll admit.

The second part of your comment makes complete sense, so I can accept that at face value. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

Ребята can mean both "children" and "guys". Дети means children in age as well as children of someone - just like in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pafkorn
pafkorn
  • 19
  • 10
  • 8
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

"Дети" actually has its singular form - "дитя".

But it has archaic / poetic usage.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

True, thanks for the reminder.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink
J.C.Fink
  • 20
  • 16
  • 16
  • 8

After all in English we do say "people" (plural), but "person" (singular". Different stems.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisatillerman

Why is "do you have children ?" Wrong as an equivalent? If you dont know whether the person has children or not, you would naturally say it using the plural children... wouldnt you?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

If you want to know if they have children, then you would naturally say it using the plural children. But if you want to know if they have a child, then you would use the singular child. That's what the question is here. Of course, in most cases it's more normal to use the plural rather than making any assumptions about the number of kids, but there could be exceptions and this is apparently one of them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisatillerman

So do the Russian usually ask people if they have one child specifically? Or is it as uncommon to ask the sentence with ребёнок as with "a child"? (the point being to learn to speak naturally right?)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

In Russian it's also possible and I think more common to say "У тебя есть дети?" Non-native speaker here, but I'm pretty certain you can use each sentence as you would the English equivalent, дети when you'd say children in English and ребёнок when you'd say child.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

I'm a native Russian speaker, and I confirm that you're right :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

Always good when that happens :-) Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mexteach61
Mexteach61
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Why do I keep getting a "wrong" response if I type exactly the same thing that is in the correct solution box? I can't get on because it keeps asking the same thing and keeps grading me wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

Could you have typed some Latin E with umlaut instead of Russian Ё?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mexteach61
Mexteach61
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

That's quite possible Olimo. I'm still beginning to try and get used to the Russian letters. I thought it had to do with the apostrophe behind "est".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

Ah, I don't know how to help you if you use transliteration. But if you use the Cyrillic script, you should use the Cyrillic letter Ё (or Е, it is also accepted).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mexteach61
Mexteach61
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Thanks Olimo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hillerburton

Is "У тебя есть ребёнок?" correct and preferred? I was under the impression that omitting the "есть" is preferred, since the focus isn't so much on "possession" of the child per se.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

The focus is on the existence of a child, so you shouldn't omit "есть".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matheus.so14

If you like to memorize strong sillabes: Ё is always strong, so if Ребёнок, the sillabe бё is the strong. And О in a non-strong sillabe have the same sound of the à (brazilian portuguese letter sound)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpatkat

Please contribute. You may notice something a native speaker missed. Grammar can be studied by anyone.

Experiencing a language helps. But nothing about language is absolute. So please put those questions out there.

Language evolves as we use it, too.

Homework: look up the definition of the English word "mark".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nevyn.holm

Im having trouble getting the hang of the phonetics for ребёнок, can someone help me out here? It sounds like "elebyonuk"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CELTON16

Do you have a child

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaftaliFri1
NaftaliFri1
  • 21
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5
  • 6

Is the ре at the beginning pronounced? I don't hear it in the audio

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

Yes, it should be pronounced. I hear it pretty clearly in the audio.

Remember that you can try forvo for pronunciations of words pronounced by actual live natives (as opposed to the robot here). https://forvo.com/languages/ru/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaMegami
LaMegami
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 2

To remember what Child is in Russian, I just think that some children tend to be rebels. Ребëнок

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cihogan

I was infuriated that "have you a child?" was not accepted. It prompted me to use "have got" which is incorrect as "got" means received rather than current possession. I think it's one of those mistakes that's just being accepted in English because so many people get it wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 4
  • 2

"Have you got" to mean "do you have" is perfectly normal everyday English and has been for a long time. When something has been in such common usage for so long perhaps it's time to stop saying it's incorrect and acknowledge that the word has changed in meaning. "Have you a child" should be accepted and you should report that it wasn't, but do remember that the course is still in beta, which means they know it's not perfect yet. If you're going to be infuriated about missing translations, maybe you should wait at least until it's out of beta.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matgut10

"Do you have child?" I don't see it as wrong, but duolingo say so

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moomingirl
Moomingirl
  • 25
  • 20
  • 17
  • 17
  • 12

That is incorrect English. You always need an article.

We would say "Do you have a child" (normally, if asking if someone is a parent) or "Do you have the child" (if talking about a specific child), but never "Do you have child"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LingvaLupo

Almost correct. The article is necessary for singular nouns. For plural (" Do you have children?") no article is used.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moomingirl
Moomingirl
  • 25
  • 20
  • 17
  • 17
  • 12

We were talking about the singular, so I hadn't even considered the plural. You are quite right, it does work without the article for the plural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mexteach61
Mexteach61
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

there is the article "a" missing in front of "child"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

Is English your native language?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mexteach61
Mexteach61
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

No , Olimo, actually it isn't. My native tongue is Flemish from the north of Belgium, which is where I am from originally. I now live and work as an English teacher in Mexico.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mexteach61
Mexteach61
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

but I just realised you weren't asking me ! oops.....Here in Mexico it is still Sunday morning.....guess I'm not completely awake yet ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

Have a good day :-)

I asked matgut10 because I'm not a native English speaker myself and I would not try to teach a native speaker their own grammar. Maybe it is me who doesn't know something about leaving out articles :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mexteach61
Mexteach61
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Hey Olimo, us "non-natives" don't have to be shy to point out mistakes at times to natives. That doesn't only apply to English for hat matter. I'm sure both of us make mistakes in our own languages which learners, purely due to the fact that for them it isn't self evident, will be able to point out to us.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G1001
G1001
  • 15
  • 13
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

Hi, to omit the articles was acceptable, maybe, 200 years ago e.g "I saw mother with child in arms; she looked lost." Now it's archaic and we'd say, ""I saw the mother with the child in her arms; she looked lost."

3 years ago
Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.