"Wie wirkt sie auf dich?"

Translation:How does she seem to you?

January 7, 2013

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cmalagoni
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I wrote "How does she have an effect on you?" but it said that "How does she have an affect on you?" was the correct one. But to my understanding that is completely wrong. Should I report it?

June 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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Yep, it's either "have an effect" or "to affect". "Have an affect" is wrong.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/G-Shumway

Well, not quite. While 'affect' is almost always an intransitive verb (excepting a narrow, largely anachronistic usage), 'effect' can be EITHER a noun or an intransitive verb. So "to effect" is also correct. While 'to have an affect' is clearly wrong.

Subjectively, I'd say 'to effect' is more common than 'to affect' in modern American English. Maybe it's because many people remember there is a distinction between 'affect' and 'effect' but don't remember exactly what it is.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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US native speaker here.

Wataya is correct: in this sentence, "affect" is correct, and a transitive verb. "Effect," in this context, would be a noun. For example, "How does she affect you?" or "What effect does she have on you?" would both be correct (although the latter might not be the best translation for the German).

There are contexts in which "affect" is a noun - generally describing psychological phenomena - but that's not the meaning that's at issue here. (See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/affect )

There are also contexts in which "effect" is a verb (e.g., "to effect a solution" means to cause or bring about a solution - but clearly that's also not the meaning in this sentence. (See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/effect )

G-Shumway is correct in saying that confusing the two words is fairly common in US English, but it is still an error to do so. Because it's a common error, it may one day become acceptable usage - but it isn't accepted yet by any authoritative source that I know of.

Here's another explanation: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/affect-versus-effect

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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But "to effect" does not mean the same thing as "to affect". I'm not a native speaker but "How does she effect you" also seems wrong to me.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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Wataya, you're correct again. To effect a change is to cause a change. To affect a change is to alter that change in some fashion.

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/royalt213

"To affect a change" could also mean something like "To pretend a change has been made" or "To pretend to change something."

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
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Yes, you're quite right; "to effect" means "to cause a thing to happen" so "How does she effect you" would mean "how does she cause you to happen?"

You might effect a payment -- cause a payment to be made -- or effect a compromise -- cause a compromise to be made.

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JMBarrett52

Perhaps it would be clearer were it structured this way: What effect does she have on you? Meaning: in what ways do you act differently when you are in her company.

August 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/G-Shumway

You have a good ear. The dictionary definitions of the transitive verb forms are so very close that dictionaries try to tease out the nuance by example. Working with this phrase I might give: "She affects you by effecting a change in your behavior." as an example. But I don't know that I can explain WHY it's that way to you "effectively" :-)

Effect is more an active term where you are willfully doing something as in "effecting a change". Affect is more passive. "She affects you" does not imply she's doing anything to produce the effect.

So you are absolutely correct that there is (technically) a nuanced difference between the transitive verb forms of 'affect' and 'effect'. But I don't see it so strictly observed in common usage as it was years ago. The use of 'affect' as a noun however would still be recognized as wrong by any educated person.

It's likely that some grammar school teacher maintains a web site devoted to this topic if anyone cares enough ...

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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The dictionaries are more explicit than you suggest. - and "affect" is a perfectly good noun in its own terms. I recommend that you check the sources I listed. They should clarify the matter for you.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JMBarrett52

Effect is to have influence on; affect is something that was influenced.

He wanted to run for office to effect change. Her sadness affected me deeply.

I still don't understand how "Wie wirkt sie auf dich" which literally means "What effect does she have on you" translates to "How does she seem to you?" These are two different meanings in English.

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

All these people who replied down voting each other but they're all saying the same thing and agreeing with each other haha! Yes, report it. And yes, many natives confuse 'effect' and 'affect' just like many people confuse 'immigrate' and 'emigrate'.

August 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/iulian19

I said "how is it working on you" and Duo said it's wrong. What do you think?

January 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
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Then it would be: "how is SHE working on you."please try again. It is the exact translation. One could replace working with effecting, to make it more commonly used English. Then it would be: "How is she effecting you". But that sounds bad in my ears. Better English would probably be: "What effect does she have on you" or maybe "what impression does she make". The question is in which context this is said. You sit in a bar with a friend and you see this girl. He says: Wie wirkt she auf dich" and you reply something like: "she doen't make me hot or cold. " or: I think she is over 18. A little bit context makes it nicer :)

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/iulian19

Thanks for replying. However, the way I saw the sentence was different. I thought of "sie" as of an object. For example, I am using a type of body lotion, and my friend is asking me: "how does it work on you"?

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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Actually, and not to be picky (though it's in my job description ;-) in English common usage, the verb is "affect"; the noun is "effect."*

To my ear, "how is she affecting you?" sounds OK; so does "how does she affect you?" But you probably wouldn't use either one in a bar, in the context you mention. Rather, you'd say "what do you think of her?"

*There is a noun form of "affect" and a verb form of "effect," but each of these have different meanings from what we're discussing here. See discussion above.

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
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Thanks. One of the problems with this sentence is that is is difficult to imagine a situation where somebody would say this sentence. Another problem is that the DUOLINGO translation: How does she seem to you? Also quite weak is, if not WRONG. Although google translate says: https://translate.google.nl/#de/en/wirkt "seem" is a possiblity. Google advices "Work" and "act". So a possible translation would be: "How does she act on you" OR "how does she operate on you" . It is very diffcult to imagine a situation where sombody would say that.

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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Judging from what wataya has said about the German (I can only speak for the English, as a US English speaker) the real problem seems to be that a literal translation doesn't necessarily work well here.

"How does she seem to you?" would commonly be used, for example, to mean "Does she seem to be feeling better?" or "How does she seem to be coping with losing her job / mother / house?"

"How does she operate on you?" would be an odd question in US English. Usually, a person operating on another person is a surgeon, conducting a medical operation.

"How does she act on you?" would also be an unusual sentence. I'm not sure what it would mean in any context.

Again, I can't speak for what the German sentence means, but given the barroom situation you mention, the question you'd be most likely to ask would be "How does she seem to you?" or "What do you think of her?"

It's interesting that there seems to be a difference here between the focus, or agency, in the German sentence and that in the English sentence. In the English sentence, the question is about what's going on in your head - "she" isn't actually doing anything. The German question, however, asks what "she" is doing and how that affects you.

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Enedlammeniel

It's giving me two translations for this, "How does she seem to you?" and "How does she affect you?" These mean very different things. :/

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Agonisti
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Is this a (separable) verb aufwirken, just another meaning that wirken has or a meaning formed by the use of auf in conjunction with wirken (but not as one, separable verb)?

August 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/-Copernicus-
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The verb is just "wirken," with "auf sie" as a separate prepositional phrase. (A separable verb would have the prefix at the end of the sentence, like "Wie wirkt sie dich auf" ("aufwirken" isn't a real word though).)

December 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

I said "Wie w..." and stopped because I was pronouncing it wrong and it was marked correct. Is there a report button for that?!

August 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/HD123
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I wrote "how does it work on you"

April 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertHJMa

'How does she seem to you?' is the right translation, it seems!

September 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kris6284
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How does she look on you marked as incorrect.

November 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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"How does she look on you?" doesn't have the same meaning in English. It doesn't quite make sense in English, though it might be taken to mean "What does she think of you?"

November 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Huy_Ngo
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Somehow in the lesson "dich" sounds like "dlich", but it's fine here.

December 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertHJMa

'How does she seem to you' Should be accepted surely?

May 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/xxy246
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"How does she impact on you?"?

December 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/-Copernicus-
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"How does she impact you" should be fine, but "impact on you" is ungrammatical."

December 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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The word "impact" is used both as a noun and as a verb. She may have an impact on you (impact as noun) but she impacts you (verb, no preposition).

December 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Petr515338

Why "how does it affect you" is marked incorrect? It can be "die Medizin" so female in German and neuter in English...

March 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Conan275108

A better translation is "How does she appear to you?"

May 8, 2018
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