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  5. "An apple and an orange."

"An apple and an orange."

Translation:Et eple og en appelsin.

November 7, 2015

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patlaplante

why is apple et and orange en?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

because nouns in Norwegian have grammatical gender. Neuter nouns get et and masculine nouns get en. It's best to learn the grammatical gender of the noun at the same time as you learn the word itself. Take a look at https://www.duolingo.com/skill/nb/Basics


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patlaplante

@griffindd thanks for the reply.

I get it about neuter nouns... I just don't understand why apple is neuter and orange is not. They are both fruit! Is there a rule or is this just an exception?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

In most cases nothing about a noun itself will tell you what grammatical gender it has. Some pointers are if the noun refers to something which has a 'natural' gender: boy, man and bull are masculine; girl, daughter and cow are feminine. Words ending in -else, -sjon and -dom are masculine. Words ending in - ning referring to people are masculine. Words ending in -eri are neuter. There are a few more odd pointers like that but for the most part you just have to learn (the most likely arbitrary seeming) grammatical gender of each noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/texadon

Does anyone know the etymology behind appelsin? It reminds my of the word apple, which makes me think of the humorous nature of the French word for potato, une pomme de terre, an apple of the Earth :3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/griffindd

Appel is indeed related to apple. As far as I know apple was originally a generic word for fruit and the suffix -sin means from China. So appelsin is a 'chinese apple' or 'chinese fruit'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/texadon

That makes sense, considering Sino is often used for Chinese titles of antiquity (like the Russo-Sino war.... I think that's a thing XD)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krimpet1

Why wouldn't they change it to "eplesin"?

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