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"моё слово"

Translation:my word

November 7, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

So is моё the neuter singular form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrookeLorren

Would this be used in the sense of "I give you my word." as in you make a promise?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycelote

The common way to make a promise is Даю слово. (Literally, "I give you the word").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JewishPolyglot

What about "My word!" as in, "That Russian baby just clobbered a bear - my word!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycelote

People would understand what you're trying to say, but I personally haven't heard such usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

I've heard "my word!" as a euphemism for "My God!", but it sounds very old-fashioned to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vanw39

Then what about "My stars and garters!"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyGoat8

yeah, i also want to know if "мое слово!" = "о боже!", for "stars and garters" it's very rare and old in english and it would sound weird, as if you were raised by an old southern babushka


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrookeLorren

спасибо!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablopublico

To promise something, in Spanish we say "te doy mi palabra", "I give you my word". A shortened form of the dated "palabra de honor", "word of honor". But it is also used to assert something: "Fulanito y Zutanita se besaron, te doy mi palabra", "John and Jane Doe kissed, I give you my word".

However, "dar la palabra", "to give someone the word", means to allow to speak. "El juez le dio la palabra al acusado", "the judge gave the word to the accused".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aguadopd

There are tips and notes for every lesson, but they are only visible in the web app. https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ru/Possessive-Modifiers-1

Tips and notes

POSSESSIVE ENEMY MINE

There isn't much to say about words like "my" or "your" in Russian.

his/her/their do not change: его́, её, их(and they don't get an initial Н after prepositions!)

my/your/our roughly follow an adjectival pattern, i.e. they copy the gender and the case of the noun they describe. Just like этот:

>>мой/твой/наш папа

>>моя́/твоя́/на́ша ма́ма

Unlike English, no distinction is made between my and mine, her and hers etc.

Pronunciation: in «его», as well as in adjective endings and "сегодня" the letter Г is pronounced В. It is a historical spelling.


GRAMMATICAL GENDER

Nouns in Russian belong to one of three genders: feminine, masculine or neuter. If a noun means a person of a certain gender, use that one. For all other nouns look at the end of the word:

(TABLE) ENDING IN NOM; GENDER; EXAMPLES

-а/-я ; feminine ; ма́ма, земля́, Росси́я, маши́на

consonant ; masculine ; сок, ма́льчик, чай, интерне́т, апельси́н

-о/-е ; neuter ; окно́, яйцо́, мо́ре

-ь ; feminine or masculine - consult a dictionary ; ло́шадь, ночь, мать, любо́вь / день, конь, медве́дь, учи́тель


IF THERE'S A SOFT SIGN, IT ISN'T POSSIBLE TO PREDICT THE GENDER, AT LEAST, NOT ACCURATELY. HOWEVER, ABOUT 65-70% OF THE MOST USED NOUNS THAT END IN -Ь ARE FEMININE. ALSO, YOU CAN LEARN THE COMMON SUFFIXES ENDING IN A SOFT SIGN THAT PRODUCE A WORD OF A PREDICTABLE GENDER. THEY ARE:

-ость/-есть, -знь → feminine

-тель, -арь, -ырь → masculine

ALL NOUNS WITH -ЧЬ, ЩЬ, -ШЬ, -ЖЬ AT THE END ARE FEMININE. THE CONVENTION IS TO SPELL FEMININE NOUNS WITH A SOFT SIGN AND MASCULINE ONES WITHOUT ONE: НОЖ, ЛУЧ, МУЖ, ДУШ. IT DOESN'T AFFECT PRONUNCIATION, ANYWAY.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redbluerat

Is this an exclamation like in english? E.g.:

"My word that's fat cat!!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HollyMollyo

So, if someone doesnt have a russian keyboard, means that cannot follow the course? In this question, I wrote "moyo clova". My dilemma is whether I should answer according to the written type of russian or the acoustic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dalton809639

If you can only type in English, then you need to transliterate; you need to learn how Duolingo expects you to write out the sounds of Russian. "Moyo clova" is mostly right (as far as I know; I just downloaded a phonetic Cyrillic keyboard), but you wrote "C" instead of "S" for "slova".

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