"моё слово"

Translation:my word

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BrookeLorren
BrookeLorren
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Would this be used in the sense of "I give you my word." as in you make a promise?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slycelote
slycelote
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The common way to make a promise is Даю слово. (Literally, "I give you the word").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
JewishPolyglot
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What about "My word!" as in, "That Russian baby just clobbered a bear - my word!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slycelote
slycelote
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People would understand what you're trying to say, but I personally haven't heard such usage.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
AnUnicorn
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I've heard "my word!" as a euphemism for "My God!", but it sounds very old-fashioned to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vanw39
vanw39
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Then what about "My stars and garters!"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YTcassadyDodson
YTcassadyDodson
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yeah, i also want to know if "мое слово!" = "о боже!", for "stars and garters" it's very rare and old in english and it would sound weird, as if you were raised by an old southern babushka

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrookeLorren
BrookeLorren
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спасибо!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AneurinEE
AneurinEEPlus
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So is моё the neuter singular form?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/draquila

Yes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pye20
pye20
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[ · мой/твой нос · my/your nose · masculine nominative · ]
[ · моя/твоя имя · my/your name · feminine nominative · ]
[ · моё/твоё ухо · my/your ear · neuter nominative · ]
[ · мои/твои уши · my/your ears · plural nominative · ]
[ · https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ru/Possessive-Modifiers-1/tips-and-notes · ]

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dav7nn
Dav7nn
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In nominative.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aguadopd

There are tips and notes for every lesson, but they are only visible in the web app. https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ru/Possessive-Modifiers-1

Tips and notes

POSSESSIVE ENEMY MINE

There isn't much to say about words like "my" or "your" in Russian.

his/her/their do not change: его́, её, их(and they don't get an initial Н after prepositions!)

my/your/our roughly follow an adjectival pattern, i.e. they copy the gender and the case of the noun they describe. Just like этот:

>>мой/твой/наш папа

>>моя́/твоя́/на́ша ма́ма

Unlike English, no distinction is made between my and mine, her and hers etc.

Pronunciation: in «его», as well as in adjective endings and "сегодня" the letter Г is pronounced В. It is a historical spelling.


GRAMMATICAL GENDER

Nouns in Russian belong to one of three genders: feminine, masculine or neuter. If a noun means a person of a certain gender, use that one. For all other nouns look at the end of the word:

(TABLE) ENDING IN NOM; GENDER; EXAMPLES

-а/-я ; feminine ; ма́ма, земля́, Росси́я, маши́на

consonant ; masculine ; сок, ма́льчик, чай, интерне́т, апельси́н

-о/-е ; neuter ; окно́, яйцо́, мо́ре

-ь ; feminine or masculine - consult a dictionary ; ло́шадь, ночь, мать, любо́вь / день, конь, медве́дь, учи́тель


IF THERE'S A SOFT SIGN, IT ISN'T POSSIBLE TO PREDICT THE GENDER, AT LEAST, NOT ACCURATELY. HOWEVER, ABOUT 65-70% OF THE MOST USED NOUNS THAT END IN -Ь ARE FEMININE. ALSO, YOU CAN LEARN THE COMMON SUFFIXES ENDING IN A SOFT SIGN THAT PRODUCE A WORD OF A PREDICTABLE GENDER. THEY ARE:

-ость/-есть, -знь → feminine

-тель, -арь, -ырь → masculine

ALL NOUNS WITH -ЧЬ, ЩЬ, -ШЬ, -ЖЬ AT THE END ARE FEMININE. THE CONVENTION IS TO SPELL FEMININE NOUNS WITH A SOFT SIGN AND MASCULINE ONES WITHOUT ONE: НОЖ, ЛУЧ, МУЖ, ДУШ. IT DOESN'T AFFECT PRONUNCIATION, ANYWAY.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HollyMollyo
HollyMollyo
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So, if someone doesnt have a russian keyboard, means that cannot follow the course? In this question, I wrote "moyo clova". My dilemma is whether I should answer according to the written type of russian or the acoustic?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dalton809639

If you can only type in English, then you need to transliterate; you need to learn how Duolingo expects you to write out the sounds of Russian. "Moyo clova" is mostly right (as far as I know; I just downloaded a phonetic Cyrillic keyboard), but you wrote "C" instead of "S" for "slova".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roumborak

Hi all, why is "мое слово" not "my words" , now, I do understand that it is literally translated into singular, and i do understand that in some rare occasions it could be used to mean "my word - my own word" but in general the whole word "слово" i think could mean "words" and though I am not Russian , it sounds more natural like that....to me that is. Please correct me if i understand it wrong.

4 months ago
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