"Ich ging ins Schwimmbad mit meinem Vater."

Translation:I went to the pool with my father.

January 7, 2013

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nicofs

The word order is a bit odd. It should be "Ich ging mit meinem Vater ins Schwimmbad." - and on second thought: "Schwimmbad" is a public swimming pool, explicitly excluding the meaning of "pool" as something private in the backyard. That would be a "Pool" or "Schwimmbecken".

January 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/backtoschool

I reported it.

July 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

I am a little confused, it accepted "I went in the pool with my father" but.... I feel it ought to mean "I went to the public pool with my father." I didn't chance it but can anyone confirm my feeling that this would be the more likely meaning if an actual German said it? Or am I wrong.

April 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/backtoschool

Ok I try to explain:

"Ins Schwimmbad gehen..." implies in German that you go in a building which has a swimming pool. Nowadays these kind of "Schwimmbaeder" have also outside pools or can open the roof and lot of other fancy things, but they are referred to as a building, and hence you go in a building.

The public pool is also known in German as: "Freibad" where the pool is outside "unter freiem Himmel" and it might even be a natural water like a lake or river. And that sounds like this:

"...ins Freibad gehen." Here it means you are going inside the borders of the public pool. (fenced in area) and that also means in German "...hineingehen."

None of them really mean that you go in the water (in the pool). Some people go only for sun-bathing to the pool.

ins Schwimmbad gehen" = to go to the pool,

Schwimmen gehen (im pool etc.) = to go for a swim.

April 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

You see that's just what I thought, but then if a person is at home while saying this, then what they really mean is that they are going to go TO the public swimming pool? Or would you only say "ich gehe ins Schwimmbad" if you were standing outside and about to go inside?

April 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/backtoschool

Ok, I got ya.

For: Being home and expressing that you are going to the pool with the intention to swim or at least sit by the pool, you say: "Ich gehe ins Schwimmbad / Freibad"

<pre> *** </pre>

But for: Being anywhere and telling your intention to go to the pool to pick up your kids, after they finished their swimming lesson you would say: "Ich gehe zum Schwimmbad / Freibad und hole meine Kinder vom Schwimmunterricht ab."

Your intention is not to go swimming sunbathing. By the way it is not so strict that you cannot enter the building, because most of the time you go at least to the foyer to pick up your kids.

Hope I got it now. :-)

April 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

Okay thanks, that's what I wanted to know.

April 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Domleschg

? I don't see anything here that makes it a public pool.

June 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/backtoschool

Well,

when you translate from German to English:

Schwimmbad = public pool

from English to German

pool = (most likey) private pool

aquatic center, public pool = Schwimmbad

June 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Domleschg

? Where have you seem "Schwimmbad" translated as "public pool"? All my sources simply give "swimming pool." Do you have another source?

See, for example: http://de.pons.com/übersetzung?q=schwimmbad&l=deen&in=&lf=de http://www.dict.cc/?s=schwimmbad http://dict.leo.org/ende/index_en.html#/search=Schwimmbad&searchLoc=0&resultOrder=basic&multiwordShowSingle=on

June 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/backtoschool

The German wordfamily:

Schwimmbad, Badeanstalt, oeffentliches Schwimmbad, Schwimmhalle,

have all the same implications of being big/large (too big to have it at home, except being a Multi-Millionaire) place to go together for leisure especially water related like swimming, sun bathing, water sliding etc.

The German word family:

Badezimmer, Bad, Pool, Swimming Pool (please note that Pool is a German word here) are implying rather small water facilities. Yes you hear right the German "Swimming Pool" means the pool by the house, the mostly private one and should not be confused with Schwimmbad, Schwimmhalle, 25m Becken, 50m Becken or Olymipscher Swimmingpool!!!!!!!!

That's the answer. I have not found any links, but if you don't believe me, ask Christian, Wataya, Sakasiru etc. if you have them in your list of friends. :-)

In regards to your sources, I like them too, but it shows that they are incomplete. It might be worth looking in the Deutsche Duden, they have often nice examples.

Edit:

There is actually more to it:

Bad as a proper name in "Bad Königshofen'

stands for places they are know for public remedial clinic bath facilities.

And if you as a German on holiday abroad and you are in a hotel and say to your friend: "I got to the pool" as in: "Ich geh mal in den Pool ein bischen schwimmen" than of course you me the public pool.

June 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio

Interesting. I hadn't encountered that implication before.

June 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Domleschg

Fascinating. I was so surprised that I did seek confirmation - and got it. Thanks for the lesson.

June 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KjayJ

Very interesting comments on the meaning and use of Schwimmbad but would the following construction ever be used to mean 'I went to the pool with my dad'? 'Ich bin mit meinem Vater ins Schwimmbad gehen'.

October 7, 2017
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