"Твоя музыка такая громкая!"

Translation:Your music is so loud!

3 years ago

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/IroKounadi
IroKounadiPlus
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Does такая here has the sense of "too" - used in a negative sense? As in "your music is too loud"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpferdeort
kpferdeort
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No. You would probably use слишком for that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/serbioski
serbioski
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Just got a wrong for this

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rekty
Rekty
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Why is так linked to the adjective and the noun? I would expect it to be independent and always be written так.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smarnv
smarnv
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In this case we actually use the adjectival pronoun «такой» since it modifies the noun «музыка», not the adjective «громкая»: ‘What kind of music?’ / «Какая музыка?» – «Такая громкая музыка!»

You could also use «так» in similar constructions, but it has different connotation and we often (usually?) use a different word in English. For example, «Шоколад так вредный!?» = “Is chocolate that bad (for your health)!?”

I guess this is one of the things you just get used to at some point…

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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Your comment is very informative and appreciated, but it doesn't answer the question.

In English, Spanish, and Italian (and probably French, I just can't recall right now), words that modify adjectives are defined as invariable adverbs. Since the English translation of такая громка is "so loud", такая appears to be modifying громка - and should be an invariable adverb (suggested by rekty to be simply так громка).

So, the question is: Why isn't it just так громка? Why does такая agree with the noun - or is it agreeing with громка according to some rule of Russian grammar that has not been explained to us?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smarnv
smarnv
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I am pretty sure the question was changed after I wrote my previous comment. Nonetheless, those are just two different words that happen to look similarly. In this case the word modifies the noun, so «такой» is the appropriate choice.

This is how Russian works and as said above, sometimes you actually want to modify the verb (if present at all), or the adjective (e.g. when there is no noun or in deliberate constructions that are often phrased otherwise in English).

Not sure if there are any explicit rules, but this is pretty common, so you'll get used to it as soon as you get a little bit more exposure to the language and its native speakers.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I did a context search on "music so loud" and was presented with quite a number of Russian sentences and phrases using такая громкая музыка and так громкая музыка (not necessary in that order). The English translations were varied, but there was no discernible difference between the usages that I could see. The question is whether there is a nuance of meaning between the two, or just a matter of one being more formal than the other, or some other reason for the difference.

I don't know that there is some corollary grammar in English for this kind of situation, where you have two related adjectives which modify a noun AND one adjective modifies the other to some extent.

I am patient - you have to be learning Russian from English (and I'm sure going the other way), and some things have become clear which were pretty foggy before. Asking questions like this - even if somewhat misdirected or even wrongly directed - help clarify these interesting bits of grammar, because they force explanation and thought. So, even if I don't get an answer I can understand now, the process will ultimately yield the result.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robrob1961

I'm not a native speaker by any stretch but I did spend a year in military language school. To my ear "так громкая музыка" sounds like "such loud music." I think in this case, "так" is not modifying the noun (so no feminine ending) but is being used as an exclamation. E.G. In English "boy, your music is loud!"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aalbergz
aalbergz
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Your music is so/very loud? I think both would make sense

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/an_alias
an_alias
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Wouldn't "very" be "очень"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/go4jc247

The sentences "The music is so loud!" and "The music is very loud!" have the same meaning in English, so i believe these would be interchangeable in this context. I am not fluent in Russian yet, but there were times where I would use "очень" as I would in English and was told that "очень" didn't fit or make sense, so I had to use another word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/an_alias
an_alias
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> so i believe these would be interchangeable in this context

I don't think so. They each have a slightly different meaning.

"Your music is very loud" - Simple, neutral observation.

"Your music is so loud" - To me, at least, this isn't just an observation but a commentary on the situation.

In fact, I would say that "Your music is so/too loud" would be more interchangeable than "Your music is so/very loud".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/go4jc247

This seams to be a grey area and could depend on the context. If I ready liked loud music and my friend had an awesome loud system, I could say "Your music is so loud" and at the same time not be saying "Your music is too loud". And if my mom walked in my room and said "Your music is very loud" I would know I was busted and need to turn it down, :-). But I think it really depends on the context, and who is saying it.

:-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chucklenuts7
Chucklenuts7
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The answer choices are so entertaining to read, there was "German" in there. "Your German music is so loud!", "Your music is so German!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/obscure-memes
obscure-memes
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*plays Nazi Germany national anthem* «Твоя музыка такая немецкая!»

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasonsudana
Jasonsudana
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  • Plays USSR anthem to counter *

Союз нерушимый республик свободных!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/obscure-memes
obscure-memes
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*critical hit* enemy down

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P-Code
P-Code
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"What did you say? I couldn't hear you over my loud music!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madandrew1216

Hardbass intensifies

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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I have difficulty with this translation ("Your music is so loud") because такая is an adjective, and so is an adverb as used in this sentence. (Using the adjective such to say, "Your music is such loud!" is grammatically incorrect in English; so I am not asking for that to be input as a translation. I simply seek to understand.) Is такой/такая/такое/etc., a word that doesn't translate its grammatical function too neatly between languages? If so, I will adapt. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I raised this question again in response to rekty's comment above. Hopefully we will get an answer sometime before I get too old to remember anything.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaroldWonh
HaroldWonh
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There is no chance of getting this right when it is presented for the first time as a dictation sentence!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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Duo may have listened to you. It was presented to me as a simple translation sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nopity-

-my mother, at all times

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chucklenuts7
Chucklenuts7
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why is this so badly downvoted? geez

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeVinDuRosier

how about “quite loud”?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rekty
Rekty
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Quite loud = a little too loud, so/too loud = very loud. There is a difference between these two.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlAgren

Turn down for what!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HRentik

What is wrong with - "you have such loud music"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GianIsAwesome
GianIsAwesome
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Because that sentence doesn't mean what you think it does...If you say to someone "you have such loud music" it implies that their songs are high in volume (like some times you have really quiet songs on your iPod and then another one with 200% more volume) or noisy (think of death metal or something). So in other words you must use the word "your" (music is so loud) as it directly points to a specific moment

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucy159878

I wrote your music is very loud and it was wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robrob1961

The difference is subtle. "Very" would be more accurately "очен" while this sentence uses "really" which is "такая"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spookaburra
Spookaburra
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My biggest problem here is that "What languages do you know?" and "What languages do you speak?" are interchangeable for «Какой языки ты знаешь?», but "Your music is very loud.", and "Your music is so loud.", which I would argue hold the same meaning, aren't. It's not about «такая» vs «очень», it's about the inconsistency with what Duo will, and will not, accept.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alkajugl
alkajuglPlus
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If the loud object were a radio, would the term be такий громкий? Why isn't такий in any of my three Russian-English dictionaries?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Because it's spelled такой :) (though такое for radio, which I believe is neuter, not masculine. Double check me on that one, though.) Какой follows the same pattern.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alkajugl
alkajuglPlus
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Thanks. радио is indeed neuter as you suggested. This was helpful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elsantodel90
elsantodel90
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Typically, when adjectives are stressed on the last syllable, the masculine ending is "ой" instead of "ий". Knowing the stress of "такая" then gives you a clue that the masculine form es probably "такой" (notice that, somewhat confusingly, this typically coincides with the feminine genitive).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yashamax

I tell my students not to say something is "so..." This implies that there is some kind of comparison. I tell them that if they say "This music is so loud..." they cannot end the sentence there. They should have some other element in the predicate. For instance, "That music is so loud that I'm afraid you will wake the baby."

What do you all think about this? Are my words correct, or am I speaking like an old person?

As far as the Russian, I would say, "Your music is very loud."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/an_alias
an_alias
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What do you all think about this? Are my words correct, or am I speaking like an old person?

You're correct. But (and I say this as an old person) you're also speaking like an old person.

When you say there's an implication of comparison, you're right and "so" is still used this way in some sentences. I never really thought about it this way before.

I think in a more formal situation then I would probably include the comparison; but conversationally, I would let my listener fill in the blank. Lazy, I know...

(so are ellipses ;-) )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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In English, the usage is quite common, and a conclusory remark is understood by the listener "You music is so loud (you will damage your hearing/the neighbors will call the police/I can't stand it/it's wonderful".

The meaning and intent of "so" is entirely in the way it is said - or sometimes the context. "Your music is so loud" "Gee, thanks!" "Yes, I really like it. Look, I know I said I would be here until closing, but I have to pick up a friend at the hospital, so I'm leaving now. I'll call you...."

Seems to me you could get the same intent and meaning across pretty easily in Russian by the way you say the world. I just don't know if that happens.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robrob1961

It should also be translated as "your music is really loud."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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Incidentally, in English, colors and designs can be "loud" - something that stands out, or is outrageous.

One of the best examples of loud colors is found in the movie "Dumb and Dumber", when Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels wear their day-glo pastel pink and light blue formal wear to a fund-raiser.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chucklenuts7
Chucklenuts7
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моя музыка такая громкая, i'm swingin, patrollin, they tryna catch me ridin dirty!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vil_rojr
vil_rojr
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Why is "very loud" wrong?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robrob1961

It's just a literal translation. The meaning is nearly the same but in Russian, "very" is "очен."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spongebrand

Story of my life

7 months ago
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