"У меня есть хлеб, яблоки и тарелки."

Translation:I have bread, apples and plates.

November 7, 2015

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/whubault

Well... That's gonna make an awesome sandwich!

February 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanBarrag6

apple sandwich? :p

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/bex42

Or a nice picnic :D

March 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/bbspeak

Not to mention, one heck of a party.

October 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TheDominus

Plate sandwich sounds yummy

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/desivy38

Do they ever pluralize ''хлеб in russian?

November 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/swogri

The word хлеб as a type of food is uncountable and so has no plural. The word хлеба (а is stressed) exists, but means "grains (growing in a field)".

November 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBenet

just like in English, there are words that aren't quantifiable. We don't say I have breads, or I have waters. Neither do they :)

January 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Andersson

Yes, but some languages, e.g Sweden, treats "bread" as countable. You could say "ett bröd", meaning either a loaf ("en brödlimpa" can also be used for loaf) or a slice of bread, and "flera bröd", meaning many slices of bread. Yes, the word "bröd" does not change in plural but it is still treated as any other plural noun. ☺

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewMat85

Yes, there are two forms, хлеба and хлебы, but first means "grains" while second means "loaves of breads"

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kruger298675

In english its either a loaf of bead or just bread

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ColinHarker

Do Russians not use the "oxford comma"? ;)

December 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivaristal

Oxford comma is for English, not for Russian =) When you make a list of something in Russian, you should never use oxford comma, because it would be a mistake.

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ColinHarker

Cool, I didn't know that! спасибо!

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Cr45hM0hr

That one got me as well.

April 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimidov

У [appropriate form indicating to indicate personal pronoun] есть is have, not eat. Argh.

January 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TheKaibosh

Is the pronunciation for тарелки good? All I can her is "Tie - lo - kye"

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MikkelSBugge

Forvo.com says its as Duolingo says, although I don't know the credibility of this audio.

November 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasSebastiamAC

The pronunciation here is so bad it is the first time I actually report it.

July 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Aggebaggen

I am wondering about "i" in this sentence. So, as far as I have understood it, "i" and "a" are both words for "and" but with the difference that "i" is used when the two words are each others' opposites. For instance "papa i mama". Is this correct?

Because in this sentence "i" is used and I can't really see the word "plates" being the opposite to the word "apples".

November 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MihaiB

You've got it the other way around. The difference between 'a' and 'и' is that 'a' is used when a contrast is implied (think of it as a soft 'but'), whereas 'и' is used when there is none. For example you would use 'a' in a sentence such as 'My mother is a hairdresser, and my father is a mailman', but you would use 'и' when listing or joining up things.

Hope this helped!

November 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/lilyofdeath

I think it is because they are making a list of what they have, and regardless of the nature of the stuff being mentioned, when listing items you use и. That is what I have understood so far.

November 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Aggebaggen

Aha, ok, thank you very much.

November 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ThePatrician

All you need for a party.

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MThoriqMalano

What's the difference between и and а? I saw that a means and too.

May 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/lottelientje

You use а when there is a slight difference. Think of it as a soft "but". For example:

Я - девочка, и она - девочка. (I am a girl, and she is a girl.) Я - девочка, а он - мальчик. (I am a girl, and(but) he is a boy.)

Please correct me if I have made a mistake!

May 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Toffhee

Let us feast

February 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/naltinsora

Ah, plates. My favourite.

May 7, 2018
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