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"I do not have rice for sushi."

Translation:У меня нет риса для суши.

November 8, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agt_kington

I know that “no” is “нет,” but when does “not” translate to “не,” and when does it translate to “нет”?


[deactivated user]

    «Нет» is used in the following cases:

    • When answering a yes/no question: «Вы говори́те по-узбе́кски?» — «Нет». ('Do you speak Uzbek?' 'No, I don't.')
    • When talking about absence of something, we use «нет» + Genitive case form of the thing missing. This is usually translated 'there's no' or 'there're no': «Во всём до́ме нет све́та» ('There's no electricity in the whole house.' Literally: in whole house there-is-no light). In this construction «нет» may be replaced with «не́ту» in colloquial speech: «Во всём го́роде нету магазина комиксов» (There's not [a single] comics shop in the whole town. Literally: In whole town there-is-no shop of-comics)
    • As a particular case of the previous construction, when a preposition «у» is used to indicate possession, we translate it with «don't have», «have no»: «У меня́ нет соба́ки» (I don't have a dog. Literally: at me there-is-no dog)

    In all the other cases, we use «не». Notably:

    • When negating most verbs: «Я не зна́ю» (I don't know)
    • When negating adjectives (it's spelled as one word then): «несве́жий хлеб» (non-fresh bread, i.e. stale bread)
    • In sentences of the type «X is not Y»: «Я не ве́дьма» 'I'm not [a] witch'.

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

    There is one more use, a short negation of a statement with the omission of the "real" verb or other predicate that would carry the meaning:

    • Мы инженеры, а они нет. = We are engineers, and they aren't.
    • Мария спит, а я нет. = Maria is asleep (sleeping) and I am not.

    and even

    • Анна любит Тома, а он её нет. = Anna loves Tom, yet he does not love her.

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vytah

    нет also means "there is no"/"there are no"/"is not there"/"are not there" etc.

    In case of sentence like this, it literally means "There is no rice for sushi at me"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/obscure-memes

    I'm still confused on the difference between для and за...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe656225

    As you can see by the total lack of response, so are the Russians (I asked a friend of mine and she couldn't even understand the question lol). This said, here is what I found: - Benefit = для + Genitive - Temporal "for" (Duration after Action) = на + Accusative


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haki.76

    why "на" instead of "для" did not accept?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

    You probably remembered the use of на in на завтрак / на обед / на ужин / на десерт. This is mostly used with these meals. It does not fit here.

    • there is another, fairly narrow meaning of на that sort of corresponds to English "for". It means a quantity of resource to be depleted in making/buying/achieving something—e.g., "money for (hiring) another employee" , "concrete enough for 2 floors".

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CroHillBilly

    Why is за not also correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

    За + Accusative corresponds to English "for" in the following cases:

    • support ("He is for Liberal Democrats", "Are you for or against me?)
    • exchange ("I bought this for $20", "Thanks for your help")
    • replacement, to a degree (in English replacing "instead" with "for" might cause confusion)

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shlomi31407

    "Нету риса" а не "нет риса".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

    I saw comments about that in another exercise. "Нету риса" is more colloquial and may or may not be used in a particular region or area.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

    Does it matter what gender sushi is, since it always seems to be plural?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tim803065

    In which case is суши in this sentence? Риса is genitive because of нет. Is суши accusative?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

    It is Genitive (для requires the Genitive). Does it matter, though? All forms of суши are the same.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tim803065

    Thanks for clearing it up! It doesn't matter in this case. But it would if it was something else than sushi )


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rilianxi

    Why is it risa? It's not the subject?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoverin

    When you express the lack of something (I don't have, there isn't, etc.) you use нет + the missing thing in genitive. Риса is the genitive case for rice.

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