"Этонашучитель?"

Translation:Is this our teacher?

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
JewishPolyglot
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He looks like an owl ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pikachu025
Pikachu025
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это буквально сова!!! xD

Translation: It is literally an owl!!!

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/millermargot
millermargot
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Which one is used more commonly? учитель или преподаватель?

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    «Преподава́тель(ница)» is someone who teaches students in the university (it roughly overlaps with the English word 'professor'), «учи́тель(ница)» is someone who teaches people in school.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/HartzHandia
    HartzHandia
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    Преподавательница sounds a tad weird. (I know, dictionaries have this word but I guess you have to trust my word here. Or not :)). More generally, even though names of certain professions do have feminine forms, you need to exercise caution using them. Check the notes in the dictionary for разг./разговорное, прост./простонародное, уст./устаревшее and act accordingly.

    The second point, it is possible to call a school teacher преподаватель. All it does, it makes your speech sound more formal. The opposite is not true. One cannot call a university professor учитель or учительница, these words are reserved exclusively for school teachers.

    3 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      > guess you have to trust my word here. Or not

      Being a native speaker, I would rather trust my own language intuition, sorry ^^'

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
      Shady_arc
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      Well, in Moscow it does sound weird, about the same as "директорша". Not unheard of but a whole level less useful than учительница

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Haggra
      Haggra
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      Is the postfix -ель usually equivalent to -er? I've seen it with reader and teacher.

      5 months ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
      Shady_arc
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      -тель is a fairly common suffix to form a noun that names the object performing an action of a verb. Here are a few examples:

      • учитель (the only with the plural in -я)
      • преподаватель
      • читатель
      • выключатель, переключатель
      • родитель (quite unusual due to formation from a perfective verb)
      • житель
      • покупатель
      • руководитель
      • строитель
      • работодатель
      • свидетель
      • следователь
      • председатель

      It is not the only one, and you should know whether the word exists anyway. The one who buys is покупатель but the one who sells is продавец.

      5 months ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/9h8Y1
      9h8Y1
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      Учитель здесь человекоподобное? Нечто? Неодушевлённое? Уж простите за вопрос, я не эксперт. В школу ходил сорок лет назад, по языку имел крепкий трояк. Объясните, пожалуйста, троечнику.

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/SnwCnes
      SnwCnes
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      So " is he our teacher " not acceptable??

      7 months ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/cptchuckle

      It looks like учитель has the same root as читать, if so does this mean that, etymologically, a teacher is one who is well-read (educated)?

      4 months ago

      [deactivated user]

        I’m afraid no, those words are unrelated.

        Учи́тель is someone who teaches, it comes from ‘учить’ ‘to teach, to learn’. -уч- in this word in it is a very distant relative of -вык- привыкнуть ‘to get used to’. The -к-/-ч- interchange is still more-or-less alive in Russian, e.g. рука ‘hand’ — ручка ‘little hand, handle, pen’, and вы-/у- interchange is long dead, etymologists can recognise it, but not ordinary speakers.

        «Чита́ть» ‘to read’ is related to счита́ть ‘to believe, to think; to count’ and «почитать» ‘to worship, to think highly’. This root originally was used for something like thinking and understanding.

        So, etymologically, a teacher is someone who helps you to get used to things, and reading is thinking.

        4 months ago
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