"ОначитаетоРоссии."

Translation:She is reading about Russia.

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mosfet07

Expirienced grammarians: can про россию be used here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
  • 22
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7

Generally, "о + prepositional" and "про + accusative" are interchangeable, but in some cases one of them feels natural while the other is less so. This is one of such cases. I wouldn't say "Она читает про Россию".

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    I find «она читает про Россию» pretty natural, but this might be due to influence of Belarusian (which doesn't have «о»*). Either way, «Она читает про Россию» is absolutely OK in the Russian spoken in Belarus.

    * Well, technically it does, but it's only used for telling the time.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
    olimo
    • 22
    • 22
    • 20
    • 19
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 8
    • 7

    I don't say it's wrong, but I'd definitely prefer "о" here.

    3 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      Yes, it can be used here too.

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/GuidoSassi
      GuidoSassi
      • 14
      • 13
      • 10
      • 7
      • 3

      I heard Anna instead of she.

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/jonquigley

      Why is Russia in the genitive case here?

      2 years ago

      [deactivated user]

        It's not genitive, it's prepositional (for the noun Росси́я they're not distinguished, but for other nouns it is). You use the prepositional case after «о».

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/jonquigley

        I've read that for feminine nouns ending in "я", the "я" gets replaced by "е" in the prepositional case. Is the noun "россия" just an exception?

        2 years ago

        [deactivated user]

          All nouns with stem (part of the noun before the ending) ending in -и- get -и in the prepositional case:

          • Росси́·я → в Росси́·и (I'm separating the stem from the ending by the middle dot),
          • Монго́ли·я 'Mongolia' → в Монго́ли·и 'in Mongolia',
          • Португа́ли·я 'Portugal' → в Португа́ли·и 'in Portugal'
          • Брази́ли·я 'Brazil' → в Брази́ли·и 'in Brazil'.

          This is not limited to the feminine nouns. Many neuter nouns end in -ие and have -ии in the prepositional case (but they often have duplets in -ье, which have -ье in the prepositional case).

          • Еврови́дени·е 'Eurovision (song contest)' → на Еврови́дени·и 'on Eurovision' (BUT Еврови́день·е 'Eurovision' → на Еврови́день·е 'on Eurovision),
          • воскресе́ни·е 'resurrection' → при воскресе́ни·и 'during resurrection' (BUT воскресе́нь·е 'Sunday' → в воскресе́нь·е 'on Sunday).

          Masculine nouns ending in -ий also have this ending:

          • Тит Ли́вий· 'Titus Livius' → о Ти́т·е Ли́ви·и 'about Titus Livius',
          • Гай· Вале́рий· Кату́лл· 'Gaius Valerius Catullus' → о Га́·е Вале́ри·и Кату́лл·е 'about Gaius Valerius Catullus'.

          So, basically, the prepositional case form never ends in -ие, only in -ии.

          2 years ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/platyfrog
          platyfrog
          • 16
          • 10
          • 9
          • 9
          • 7
          • 6

          I feel like your comments teach me as much Russian as the course itself.

          1 year ago
          Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.