"Кого ты здесь знаешь?"

Translation:Whom do you know here?

11/9/2015, 5:38:57 AM

45 Comments


[deactivated user]

    What's the difference between Кого and Кто?

    Edit: Ok I understand, Кого is accusative

    12/31/2015, 2:11:21 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/leandro.feitosa
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    Would you help me then? It's not clear for me. Since it's accusative, shouldn't something on it directly?

    4/2/2016, 10:25:14 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel
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    It's the object of the verb to know.

    4/15/2016, 12:00:14 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/elsantodel90
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    Just to think a bit about cases, would

    "Кто тебя здесь знает?"

    mean "Who knows you here?"

    1/26/2016, 3:28:30 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ynhockey
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    Yes.

    7/28/2016, 2:24:45 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/NerysGhemor

    Glad they included "who do you know?" as a possible translation. That said, the frequency of that translation probably illustrates why we English speakers struggle so much with cases. ;-)

    11/9/2015, 5:38:57 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Plankinator

    I thought "whom" was only correct when used as an indirect object, i.e. "he gave the ball to whom?". Here it's being used as a direct object, and to me sounds very unnatural.

    11/2/2018, 1:54:27 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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    It's proper to use as both a direct or indirect object, but most people don't use it as a direct object any more (especially when speaking), it just sounds very very posh.

    11/2/2018, 2:05:39 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Janosch_A

    "Кого вы здесь знаете?" is wrong? Why?

    1/23/2016, 3:00:48 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
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    I would report it, because it doesn't look like it should be wrong.

    2/24/2016, 5:53:16 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/bonapard
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    It is polite form or appeal at a stranger.

    2/15/2016, 4:58:31 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Dessie464019

    Also 2nd person, plural pronoun

    4/20/2017, 2:13:09 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/PeterChengelis
    Plus
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    Should be "Whom do you know here" in English

    9/26/2016, 11:03:05 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Squonkalini
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    Technically, yes, but in colloquial English, it's "who." Let's face it, these days "whom" sounds stilted. If I were teaching ESL I would advise my students to avoid "whom" if they want to sound like a native speaker. But maybe this sounds so bad to your ears that it offends you, which is understandable. I find the use of "like" in such sentences as "Like I said" incredibly annoying, even though it too is part of the current vernacular.

    5/16/2017, 3:01:36 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/mwavus

    russian is so hard.

    4/18/2017, 9:37:54 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/El-Inc
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    Don't say that :)

    4/19/2017, 11:13:09 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/mwavus

    It really is hard though.

    4/20/2017, 8:15:29 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/El-Inc
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    Why do you want to learn it?

    4/22/2017, 7:09:12 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/mwavus

    Because I like the language. I'm only 14 years old and trying my best to learn it :)

    4/27/2017, 5:57:16 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/raphael_astro

    it isn't that hard really, you just have to understand the logic of it

    7/19/2018, 2:16:05 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoelXIII
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    Same here I'm 17 :P

    1/31/2018, 10:50:10 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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    Perhaps "hard" isn't the right word - learning Russian is "tedious", because of the need to learn the cases and how they affect agreement of nouns, pronouns, determiners, adjectives, etc. I do lots and lots of reference to various tables, to make sure I've got the right endings. That just takes a lot of time. Once I understand natural (rather than "logical") word order, it gets a little easier.

    It just takes a lot of time to verify word endings in various declension tables. There's too much to just memorize. And the relationships are too complex to just memorize stuff. Repeated contact is the only way.

    8/24/2018, 3:20:53 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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    It's OK I don't think it's that common (for the second example).

    4/19/2017, 11:38:43 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
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    How would you say 'Who do you know is here'? Would that be 'Кто ты знаешь здесь?'

    11/23/2015, 11:52:12 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/FlyingDucks
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    That's a good question that I didn't think about but would make sense since generally Russian puts more important/emphasized information later on in the sentence. Too bad no one answered it, but hey, you posted it a year ago and now you're level 22 in Russian so maybe you know and can tell me? :)

    6/12/2017, 11:54:45 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Alex393781

    Тот, кого ты знаешь, здесь?

    7/21/2017, 7:45:37 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/ErikRempe
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    Would "Do you know who is here?" be "Ты знаешь, кто здесь?"? If so, then why isn't кто in accusative?

    8/7/2016, 3:21:54 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
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    Кто is not in the accusative because it is the subject of its own clause. As for the sentence, it looks correct, but I'd let someone who speaks better Russian comment on it.

    8/7/2016, 5:16:39 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/iiVR2
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    You are true.

    11/28/2017, 1:32:15 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/TorBerglund
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    Is the "г" pronounced "v" instead of "g" here?

    3/28/2016, 9:46:14 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Nemesis_NaR

    Yes, it is. The -ого ending is almost always spelled like this I guess.

    4/5/2016, 6:43:15 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/_Maria_B._

    The -ого ending (pronounced "avoh") is a sign that the word is in genitive. I'm still not familiar with the works of genitive, though.

    5/14/2016, 6:51:18 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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    It is often pronounced as "ohva" as well, just depends on the word. -его ending is the soft equivalent.

    3/27/2017, 3:31:27 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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    Or animate accusative case in some instances

    8/24/2018, 3:27:52 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/mitchgilbe
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    It is pronounced as a "v" in some words for historical reasons.

    3/27/2017, 3:26:14 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/ClarkStephen
    Plus
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    Would "Do you know anyone here?" be an acceptable translation? (It's not accepted as I write this: 3 Jan 17).

    1/3/2017, 3:49:52 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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    Do you know anyone here? = Ты знаешь кого-нибудь здесь?

    1/13/2017, 3:29:25 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/El-Inc
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    Is "г" pronounced "v" here?

    4/15/2017, 5:50:55 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ynhockey
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    Yes.

    4/15/2017, 12:33:25 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/El-Inc
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    OK. Do you know if there is a system to when it makes a "v" sound?

    4/19/2017, 9:37:48 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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    Typically only when in accusative and genitive adjective endings (-ого и -его) and in some other words where that function was used to make the word (сегодня).

    4/19/2017, 11:07:58 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Alejo577455

    And "кому ты знаешь" can be valid??

    9/11/2017, 8:31:58 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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    No, кому is an indirect object.

    9/11/2017, 8:53:22 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/VictorPaiv10

    What means "whom"

    10/22/2017, 11:42:06 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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    It's "who" when "who" is the object of a verb or preposition. Colloquially and perhaps most commonly in modern (US) English you'd probably just hear "Who do you know here?" and that would be basically fine, but if you want to be 100% correct, "Whom" is the right word.

    10/22/2017, 11:47:44 PM
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