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  5. "Вы идёте домой или в школу?"

"Вы идёте домой или в школу?"

Translation:Are you going home or to school?

November 9, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mightypotatoe

I believe the correct answer should be "are you going home or to school?" Home doesn't take the preposition "to"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanisaChatte

Thanks for pointing that out. Fixed it :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

I think it may actually be the adverb "homewards".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruyelpequenocid

I accidentally missed "to" in front of "school", so I answered "Are you going home or school?". The above, while grammatically incorrect, it is still understandable in English. It is very frustrating when answers are marked wrong based on typos or small inaccuracies like this. This is a Russian basic course, not an English Literature essay quest... You should foresee these circumstances and allow them, perhaps indicating that a typo occurred, but not marking the entire answer as wrong!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jameswastaken1

Yes I agree, you are more likely to say it without the 'to' IRL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

Excuse me, I do not know if you have taught us this and I have forgotten it but I will just ask it anyway: when you want to express direction, then would you use в + Acc. instead of на + Acc. or к + Dat.?


[deactivated user]

    You can use all the three of them:

    • в + Acc. is used when the destination is inside an object (в шко́лу 'to/into the school', в магази́н 'to the shop'),
    • на + Acc. is used when the destination is on the surface of an object (на пля́ж 'to the beach', на у́лицу 'to the street'),
    • к + Dat. is used when the destination is near the object (к шко́ле 'to the school [but not entering it], к пля́жу 'to the beach [but not entering it]').

    This gets more complicated with intangible things (в интерне́т 'into the internet', but на сайт 'to the site'). Also, some set expressions aren't completely logical (на мо́ре 'to the seaside').


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

    Interesting how the system works. Большое спасибо за ваш ответ!

    к+Dat. is used which people, right? E.g. ‘Завтра я поеду к моей маме.’


    [deactivated user]

      Right, with people you can only use «к» out of these three.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeOwen

      Is it just me or does anyone else have trouble hearing the "в"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt92HUN

      Does Russian have both present simple and present continuous tenses?


      [deactivated user]

        No, Russian only has one present tense.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt92HUN

        Thanks, just asking because my answer wasn't accepted in present simple.


        [deactivated user]

          You should probably report it when you see this sentence next time. This course is still in the Beta stage, so it has some problems like this.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanisaChatte

          Added your suggestion too :)


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt92HUN

          Thanks. And thanks for the awesome course too.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

          Accepted today, 25.9.19. And thanks for the info that Russian doesn't distinguish :)


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anime8765024

          I wrote 'Are you going home or are you going to school ' But it said its wrong and it means the same


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvelynOlson0

          @mightpotatoe what was tge original answer? Sorry I couldn't reply; my phone doesn't let me for sime reason...


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BiMu476578

          I wrote going home or school because I though "в" was in our on if to school wouldn't you use a different preposition?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaymhssc

          The sentence is correct

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