"Она говорила, что Анна живёт в Германии."

Translation:She said that Anna lived in Germany.

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/keaaww

It sounds like "Она...она," how to know that it was "Она....Анна"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ninomde
ninomde
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i was wondering if "Анна говорила, что она живёт в Германии" would be accepted :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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Here is not a very good pronunciation. I'm a native speaker and I guessed the meaning. You can hear the difference here (spoken by native speakers):

http://ru.forvo.com/search/%D0%BE%D0%BD%D0%B0/

http://ru.forvo.com/search/%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%BD%D0%B0/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dirckk
dirckk
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Она is supposed to be [ɐˈna], while Анна should be [ˈannə]. So listen for 1) the opposite syllable being stressed, and 2) the geminate (doubled) /n/. I for one still have trouble reliably hearing the difference.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/an_alias
an_alias
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I don't understand why it's "Anna lived" and not "Anna lives". DL accepts both, but if they can mean the same thing, how do you tell the difference between the two?

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    English has a sequence of tenses, which forces us to shift verbs' tenses when converting direct speech into indirect speech:

    • She said: "I saw Vera last night." → She said that she had seen Vera the previous night.
    • Ira said: "Anna lives in Germany." → Ira said that Anna lived in Germany. (She said that Anna lives in Germany works if you know that Anna still lives there.)
    • Masha said: "I will become an interpreter." → Masha said that she would become an interpreter.

    This is because English tenses are absolute. Even when they're inside a subordinate clause, they still refer to the absolute time.

    Russian doesn’t shift tenses in such a situation:

    • Она́ сказа́ла: «Я ви́дела Ве́ру вчера ве́чером». → Она́ сказа́ла, что ви́дела Ве́ру вчера́ ве́чером.
    • И́ра сказа́ла: «А́нна живёт в Герма́нии». → И́ра сказа́ла, что А́нна живёт в Германии.
    • Ма́ша сказала: «Я ста́ну перево́дчицей». → Ма́ша сказа́ла, что ста́нет перево́дчицей.

    I.e. Russian tenses are to be understand relatively with the main clause's tense.

    In English, you can use a present tense when the main clause has a past simple if you know the situation is still true today. In Russian, there's no way of marking this easily: «сказа́ла, что А́нна живёт в Герма́нии» refers to the time of speaking, and tells us nothing about the current situation (i.e. Anna might be still living in Germany, or she might have moved already). If you need to disambiguate this sentence, you’ll need to use other means (for example: «И́ра сказала, что А́нна живёт в Герма́нии, и она́ до сих по́р там живёт». 'Ira said Anna lived in Germany, and she still lives there').

    Hope that helps.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/IroKounadi
    IroKounadiPlus
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    But we could say that "И́ра сказа́ла, что А́нна жила в германии" and that would mean that Anna was living in Germany when we had that conversation with Ira (and we don't know/ don't mention if Anna still lives there now), right?

    3 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      and that would mean that Anna was living in Germany when we had that conversation with Ira

      No, that would mean Anna lived in Germany before you had that conversation with Ira. This sentence gives us no information about whether Anna lived there at the time of the conversation or no.

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/IroKounadi
      IroKounadiPlus
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      OK, I see. Thanks a lot :-)

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Hakan510599

      Excellent explanation, thank you

      3 months ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/scottled1

      So apparently the text can mean that Anna lives or lived in Germany and thus can can be either present or past tense. So imprecise. So confusing....

      4 months ago

      [deactivated user]

        Yeah! But in fact, English us requires to add information that she wasn’t saying.

        Back then, she said: ‘Ann lives in Germany’.

        When making it into indirect speech, we can use a variant ‘She said Ann lives in Germany’ and ‘She said Ann lived in Germany’. How do we know which option to use? We need to know if Ann still lives in Germany or not, so we need to know something she didn’t said!

        Russian, on the other hand, makes this straightforward. Она говорила: «Анна живёт в Германии» always becomes Она говорила, что Анна живёт в Германии. No need to know anything about Ann now, you can just relay what was said to you.

        4 months ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
        AlexinNotTurkey
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        • 456

        Just to check, this means that she had said it multiple times in the past and not just once, right?

        3 years ago

        [deactivated user]

          It may mean both.

          «Она́ сказа́ла» would mean she said it once, «она́ говори́ла» means she might have said it once or several times.

          3 years ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
          AlexinNotTurkey
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          Aaah, I was talking about the Russian versus the English. Thanks for the affirmation :) Good to know I haven't forgotten about perfective/imperfective yet.

          3 years ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/sswofford
          sswofford
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          What would be the difference between "she said" and "she told us"?

          3 years ago
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