"Jusqu'à mes trente ans, j'ai vécu dans une maison."

Translation:Until I was thirty, I lived in a house.

2 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LesAussi

I wrote "Until my thirtieth birthday ... ", which agrees with a suggested translation as given. Why was it marked incorrect?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tragedy_Doll

How would I say "I lived in one house"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobanSnyd
SiobanSnyd
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I agree? Couldn't this be "one house"? Or does it have to have "seulement" or "ne que" to imply that sense?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rinboduffy

I wrote "Up until my thirties, I lived in a house" - I am guessing the subtle difference means it would translate differently, as the correct solution was "Until I was thirty..." How would these two phrases translate differently into French?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cadilhac

They would not really; you should report it! Arguably, my thirties is a period, while the day I turned thirty is a point in time, so this may be a difference. My thirties is ma trentaine in French, but we won't really use Jusqu'à ma trentaine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rinboduffy

Thanks! I think it might have been marked wrong because of the difference between "my thirties" and "thirty" - which makes sense. I can see how those are different. Maybe I will try "Up until I was thirty" and see if it is still incorrect. To be fair, "up until" is more conversational than grammatically correct, so it would make sense that it would still be wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrisK.
AndrisK.
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It is much more natural in Canadian English to say, "Until I turned thirty, I lived in a house."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kasuziq

How about 'until my thirtieth year? Would you say that differently?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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My thirtieth year = ma trentième année.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jim949319
Jim949319
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"Until thirty years old, I lived in a house." = wrong? Pourquoi?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jim202008

What about "I lived in one house until I was 30"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryOconne12

I wrote "until my thirtieth year I lived in a house" this was marked wrong. I am a native English speaker. This is ludicrous.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobanSnyd
SiobanSnyd
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Duolingo doesn't have every possible valid translation in their accepted answers, there are too many. But they try to do a good job of trying to accept the most likely (commonly used) ways an idea can be stated in a given language.

If the French were "Jusqu'à ma trentième année..." you would be spot on. But "Jusqu'à mes trente ans" is closer in meaning to "Until I was 30".

IMO, "Until I was 30" sounds like a more normal usage in English than "Until my 30th year". I'm not saying your answer is wrong. It looks like proper English to me and could be a valid translation (depending on the context), but it sounds a bit dated, like a quote from a Dickens book.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BashP
BashP
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When the french say how old they are, they say, for example, J'ai 30 ans (I have 30 years) so mes trente ans (my thirty years) should then translate to I was thirty (years old).

It therefore cannot be translated literally since each language uses a different verb. French uses avoir (to have) and English uses to be (être).

3 weeks ago
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