"Ha producido manzanas excelentes."

Translation:It has produced excellent apples.

4 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ProfessorRoss

He has grown excellent apples in unacceptable?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzannia

my thoughts exactly. when i look it up, the word for grown is "crecido." Though when one peeks at the definition here, during the question, "grown" is definitely among the translations offered, and would handily make the most sense, in this particular case of apples. ( ;

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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I put "You have produced excellent apples" which didn't quite sound right so I checked the DL drop down to see if "producio" could also mean "grown", and sure enough it was there. But then the answer was marked incorrect. Thinking that if "producio" can mean "grown" in any context then this would be it I checked SpanishDict which offers 22 meanings for "producir" but none of them are "grow". The suggested meanings are more like produce, or yield, so I'm not too sure just why DL offers "grown" here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejandraS946616

Grow is crecer

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

That works when you're talking about something growing bigger, but not for growing apples. For that you'd want to use "cultivar.

2 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

I tried "Excellent apples have been produced" since there is no subject given and that was marked wrong on 1/3/2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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I think a reflexive pronoun would have to be included for that passive construction, and the "haber" conjugation would have to be "han" to match "apples" so maybe: "Las manzanas excelentes se han producido." A native speaker would need to confirm/correct this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Thanks! That makes sense. I am groping in the dark here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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No probs. I've been doing a fair bit of groping myself. Unfortunately the Spanish reflexive pronouns don't seem to like being groped, but I have learnt a bit about them in the process, and still am. For instance I think I should have said the "passive se" instead of the "reflexive pronoun" for your example, and I don't think I needed to mess with the original sentence's word order. So "Ha producido manzanas excelentes" = "He/she/it/you has/have produced excellent apples" while "Se han producido manzanas excelentes" = "Excellent apples have been produced." Hopefully this is right :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I said "You have grown excellent apples" it was marked incorrect so i reported it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
nueby
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You have produced excellent apples. OK 2014-02-19.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
Camilla-danesa
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"He has grown excellent apples" should be accepted, and I am reporting it (March 2017)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PiaKonstmann
PiaKonstmann
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Hi :) I'm curious. A lot of the comments here have change Producido to Grown, though it in English (as in Danish) is two different words with two different meanings. I could not see the point of changing "producido" to grow instead of the obvious "produced"? But perhaps Producido is the one Spanish word for both producing and growing, and that is why so many try to use Grown instead of Produced? And if, then it makes sense. Or is there another explanation? Hej fra Pia. PS: Mit engelske er heller ikke perfekt ;) - og jeg er imponeret over de mange sprog du lærer. Stor respekt for det (Y) 22/03/2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
Camilla-danesa
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hi PiaKonstmann, in Spanish producir also means grow. And in English, vegetables and fruits are called "(the) produce," pronounced PROduce (different pronunciation from proDUce which is a verb). I recommend looking up words and sentences on linguee.com, I find it very very helpful when translating or learning new words. Linguee.com has often given me the nuances in language that a dictionary doesn't always provide.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Tak Pia. Din engelsk er meget god og uendeligt meget bedre end min danske - på trods af Viking side af min afstamning! (Jeg håber, Google oversætte har ikke forvrænget dette også dårligt!)

In informal English we use many shortcuts and abbreviations, not only of the words and phrases but also in the grammar. (I expect it is the same in all languages.)
It works OK when we have similar knowledge and experience, and, especially in spoken conversation, the context avoids any ambiguity; for example, talking in a garden would suggest a different meaning to what we say than if we were talking on a farm or in a factory or in a laboratory.

Of course, Duolingo's isolated sentences frequently give us little or no context. In a way this is good because it requires us to think about it and consider whether a sentence can have several different meanings. Unfortunately we also get comments from students who have clearly not thought about any meaning beyond their first interpretation.

So, in this exercise, how we interpret it depends on how precise - and perhaps how pedantic we wish to be.
- I might say that a person does not grow apples (unless they have a most peculiar medical condition! :-o ), but instead they enable the apple trees to grow the apples.
- On the other hand I might just be referring to someone, for example, managing an orchard, or to someone developing new strains of fruit in a laboratory.
- In the real world, of course, we do refer to an "apple-grower", a "fruit-farmer", and many similar "shorthand" terms in common parlance when we know that the listener will understand exactly what we mean by it.
- What is more, DL's current suggested translation is "It has produced excellent apples", which suggests to me that the sentence is referring to a particular tree or a particular type or strain of apple.
Only context will make the intended meaning clear.


Incidentally. I find Linguee is great when I want to know how things are said in the real world, but it isn't always clear whether the quotes are strictly correct (as in formal communication) or whether they make common errors or use slang or vernacular words and phrases (which are perfectly acceptable in informal use). That's when I turn to the dictionary ... or I search the DL Discussions for some extra wisdom and expertise.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PiaKonstmann
PiaKonstmann
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Thank you so much Roger
As always very, very useful information. Dit danske er helt perfekt. :)

Just a comment one tiny, tiny, little thing about "Google oversætte". And I'm not sure since I always use the phrase "Google Translate" in Danish sentences too. But if I should translate "Google translate" I would say: "Google oversæt".
I see now it's the Imperative form - and I don't really know why. But if I had to translate: "I use Google Translate. it would be: "Jeg bruger Google oversæt"

Here are some of the different ways I would translate translate .. ;)

Google, translate to Italian!= Google, oversæt til italiensk! Google's translation = Google's oversættelse. To translate = at oversætte. The translation = oversættelsen. I have translated = Jeg har oversat.

(Over sætte / over sat = To put on top of. Funny twist ;) )

Oh, languages. The more you learn about other languages, the more you become aware of your own language. And history and culture, etc, etc...

Your comments remind me so much about my 7 year older brother, (died 7 years ago) as he was also always a pleasure to talk to, as I always was taught something new! And he read and wrote a lot, and did it perfect! (After his dead we agreed he most have had a little Asberger, a mild form of autism). And his daughter have been studying Danish at the university for 6 years (after 13 years at school and college) and now 32, she is a master in linguistic too..

My parents and us 3 children always read a lot of books, and had many debates (always friendly and usefull) and the dictionaries were always used a lot during my childhood and I still have them.. though I use the PC most. Sadly I never got more into the language and the grammar, instead of "just" the topics in them. But as long as we are alive, it's never too late to learn :)

Have a great weekend, and thanks again :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
Camilla-danesa
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og tak! :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PiaKonstmann
PiaKonstmann
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Jamen, selv tak da :D Ofte når man er allermest sikker, så glemmer man, at man måske ikke kender hele "sandheden", og jeg burde jo selvfølgelig have slået ordet op først .. ups! At opdage, at man har taget fejl er ikke en ren ulempe, men en fordel, da man så er blevet lidt klogere .. ;)
Jeg kendte heller ikke linguee.com, så det råd er jeg også rigtig glad for (y)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
Camilla-danesa
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ja det er sjovt, jeg elsker også at lære nye ting!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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No. "Producir" here just relates to the end-product - "los productos agricolos" - of a process where growing is only part of it.
That is why http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=grow doesn't include "producir" and http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=producir doesn't say "grow".
But then you could have checked the dictionary just like I did!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
Camilla-danesa
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when I check linguee.com I find an example of 'grow' used as 'producir' and 'growers' as 'productores'. Here is the example: "... the mint is grown under contract and, today, six growers cultivate a total of some 400 hectares..' translates to "La menta es producida bajo contrato y hoy en día, un total de casi 400 hectáreas son cultivadas por seis productores..." http://www.linguee.com/english-spanish/search?source=auto&query=he+grows+apples

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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I had this same issue a while back. To me "grown" seemed like the logical word to use but as it was absent from dictionary definitions of "producir" I was willing to accept DL was both right for marking it wrong, and wrong for offering it as a possible meaning in the drop down.

Reflecting on it now though I would again argue that "grown" should be accepted. Apples are produced by growing them. Sure, you could say there are a few more steps in the actual production process, but fundamentally if someone produces apples, then they grow apples.

For me, we should always use (and DL should always accept) appropriate translations from the Spanish. For "Ha producido coches" we could say "She has made cars." If "Ha producido electricidad" we could say "It has generated electricity." So for "[El] ha producido manzanas excelentes" I think "He has grown excellent apples" is fine.

Perhaps "grown" is not accepted because DL's primary translation derives "It" from "Ha." This pronoun could refer to the weather, an area, a horticultural method etc., for all of which "produced" may fit better than "grown." However, if "He, She, or You" is derived from "Ha" then I think "grown" should be an appropriate translation for "producido" in this context.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Well put.

More often than not, indeed I'm hard pressed to think of an exception, whenever Duo provides a sentence without explicit subject and "it" fits, then Duo seems to accept only "it." Given that apparent bias, I think your logic regarding the use of "produced" vs "grown" applies.

Perhaps, we need to get Duo to accept other subject pronouns before working on the verbs. One step at a time.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
Camilla-danesa
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thank you! I'm glad to know that!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rutgeryeah
Rutgeryeah
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Hasn't been fixed yet unfortunatly :(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajk123456

How does one know to use 'it' or 'he'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puramboku

I am curious to know the answer to. "He", "She", "It" + "has produced excellent apples" are all valid answers I think!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yipivan
yipivan
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Steve Jobs :)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnykhatru

As there is no context, I said "THEY have produced excellent apples", not referring to a plural, but because this is what to say when you don't know the gender of the person. "I don't know who the person is, but they have produced excellent apples." I think it should be accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puramboku

If it is THEY, wouldn't it be then "Han producido ..." instead of "Ha"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnykhatru

That would imply I'm referring to multiple people, I'm showing that "they" can be used to refer to a single person.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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The use of "they" as a neuter singular pronoun is much debated. Personally I have no problem with it, but DL will always mark its use incorrect when they are expressly looking for a singular pronoun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkWest

should there be a 'lo'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Nope. Lo is not used as a subject.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkWest

cheers, but how do i know it's a 'it' and not he/she?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arnold.kemp

It could be any of the above. It could even be an Usted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xarboc

The sentence lacks context, using several persons (2nd, 3rd) produce a correct anwser

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goya1949

The correct answer uses he's with an apostrophe. The contraction is for "He is"" which is not the meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

"He's" is also the contraction for "He has". "He's gone to work," for example.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dosadnizub
dosadnizub
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Can this sentence also be translated as "good apples have been produced" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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No, that would make the apples the subject. The subject is it/he/she/usted.

Incidentally, I see that most of the comments refer to "he" or "she". I would consider "it" to be the apple tree.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Actually, "it" could be a horticultural technique.
For example: Two years ago I spliced apple tree cuttings onto a different rootstock. It [the technique] has produced excellent apples.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcCrossan
PaulMcCrossan
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Very disappointed to find an answer marked as wrong when it not only makes as much sense as the correct one but is offered by DL as an option.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

DuoLingo doesn't give us the context to this sentence. Sometimes, instead of being confused by an unexpected construction of a sentence, we need to think of context in which it may possibly be used. For instance, maybe someone is talking about the tree from which the apples were picked: "It has produced excellent apples." Now, that sentence seems to make sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdbarber
bdbarber
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Yes it does. The problem is not that the duolingo translation does not make sense. The problem is that alternate translations that also make sense (or even seem to make better sense) are not accepted as correct by duolingo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Absolutely, bdbarber. We learn from the other options even if the DL programme hasn't included them it its software. Keep them coming.

One little correction if I may: "alternate" means "every other one". The word should be "alternative".

2 years ago
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