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"They do not have milk."

Translation:У них нет молока.

November 10, 2015

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlejandroMolina9

When do I have to use молоко and молока?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgOnDuo

You use the genitive when you negate something (i.e. you dont have it or it is not there, ..): У меня есть молоко (Nominative) У меня нет молока (Genetive)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

Why does the Russian for this sentence not use "есть"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norrius

Becase you use «есть» when you have something, here they don't have milk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

I'm afraid I don't follow.

Why does the expression 'X does not have Y" not need the word "have"?

Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iamlinguanaut

It's kind of a grammar rule that <НЕТ> takes the genitive case of the nown.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norrius

You rarely even say ”have” («иметь») in Russian (and you don't need it for the affirmative sentence either). Here, you can think of «нет» as “isn't/aren't”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

My PONS cheatsheet says the Russian verb бьить (meaning "to be", not "to be located") vanished almost completely in its PRESENT tense. - only the PAST and FUTURE tenses remained more or less completely - in the PRESENT tense, the only remnant is the 3rd person singular есть, meaning "there is". That is used in the у + possessive pronoun + genitive construction to mean "have".

I guess all the other PRESENT forms just weren't necessary to express what people wanted. So the real question isn't "why does нет not have есть", but why did only есть survive; what was it needed for? To express possession. If one word suffices to exoress lack of possession (нет), why use two?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artsybrooke23

Why won't it except Они не есть молоко? Im so confused. Doesn't that mean the same thing just structured differently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nemesis_NaR

One thread earlier I've seen a reply that the Russians never use the formulation не есть


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Maria_B._

Right. And this lesson is supposed to teach genitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kgSaucey

The thread before said не + есть = нет


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

You need the genitive form of они.

Nominative: Они = they Genitive: (Н)их = their


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goukentatsu

Agreed when do use молоко and when молока?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mayanightstar

Sami- think of it like "they have no milk"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrendaDeve

Still not sure why not молоко


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daguipa

Because when you want to express negative possession (I don't have...) the thing you don't have takes the Genitive case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamiStilley

I thought for sure "no" was "нет" and "not" was "не" Was I wrong or is it just different on this type of sentance or something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/omar405101

Neutral nominative ending (o,e)

Genitive = о - а е - я мя - мени

Ех: Nom: Молоко

Genitive: Молока


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

Genitive personal pronouns in the 3rd person get the prefix н when they are preceded by a preposition, such as 'у'. (Source: German PONS cheatsheet for Russian)

(Н)его́, (Н)её, (Н)их

Incidentally, same story in other cases (except nominative).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_grind

why is NIH sometimes IH and NIH?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linbo16

мы-нас-них-их-наше-наши-нам-им....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/24jt4

Can't we say "они нет молока" ? since они means they and нет means don't have. Wouldn't the sentence be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

I guess that would mean "they are not milk" :D

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