"Wait here a little."

Translation:Подождите тут.

November 10, 2015

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sugarplum.fairy

I put 'подожди мало здесь', following the logic of using 'мало' in previous lessons. Could someone please explain why it doesn't work here? Would a different word work? Or does the verb itself convey that bit of information already?

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

"Мало" means "little", not "a little". It would be like saying "Wait here little".

October 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RikSha

Why is жди wrong?

November 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Could you provide your whole answer?

November 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RikSha

Sure. жди здесь немного

November 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Yep, that does not sound right. With limited wait подожди works way, way better. Or you can say "Жди тут!" without specifying for how long. But that's not what it says in this sentence :).

In this course I often use "wait a bit" as a translation for "подождать", which is only one of the possible interpretations. But it does work.

As a part of a larger sentence, "жди здесь немного" might work. In a certain meaning.

November 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RikSha

Interesting, thank you! (I kinda get it, but not really. I know I need more practice.) Would it make any difference if I used a specific time at the end, like (по)дожди тут два часа?

November 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

подожди or жди :) "Подо" is a variant of "под-" prefix, not a combination of по and до.

"Жди два часа" does work. It is important to understand that imperatives are a bit more complicated than the limited number of such forms given in the course. When you focus on the process, imperfective is your natural choice. When the imperative is used for an action that is limited in time or "point-like", and, in principle, perfective aspect can be used, in practice both aspects are usually possible—depending on context.

The use of the imperfective aspect for "simple commands" is associated with an urgent, immediate action that is understood as "obvious" to the listener. Naturally, it is also used with a few verbs you often say when having guests ("come in", "take of your coats", "sit down" etc.)

One consequence of such interpretation is that imperfective can also be used to demostrate agressive behavior (if the action you imply is obvious in the situation, in fact, is not obvious).

November 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane43363

What about: Подождите там немного ?

May 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Smike77

It would be 'there'

May 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidSchef4

Why does the imperative take on the formal ending for the word тут

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wwwtochkaru

Подожди здесь не много.

April 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Smike77

Подожди здесь немного

November 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asia_Szulc

I wrote подождите тут, but how do you express that a little? Cause duo didn't give me any translation of a little to choose from

December 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joseperus

My interpretation is that подождите can mean 'wait a little'. Shady_arc mentioned it as "limited wait". I guess he meant this.

December 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claudio_IT

why is подожди тут wrong?

February 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Oh. I have fixed that: you answer should work now.

February 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claudio_IT

Wow, that was fast! :)

February 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Technetic

No"little" in Russian answer

March 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauletteSm

Why not подожди здесь немножко?

August 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SharichkaV

Why is "a little" being translated as "тут" and not "чуть-чуть"? Doesn't "тут" mean "here"?

September 7, 2019
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