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https://www.duolingo.com/IanIanIanIan_

What are some good language careers for polygots? Are some languages more in demand?

IanIanIanIan_
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I really like learning languages. Its addicting and i wish i could do it all day long. I see lots of workTrade things on workaway asking for native english speakers to teach in Poland, Spain, China, etc. Maybe as a polygot i can just hop between countries forever teaching english?

Also it seems like Poland would be a place where native english speakers(who are fluent in polish) are in high demand? Just because not many americans are fluent in polish?

2 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII
BastouXII
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The obvious answer is translator, but other professions include :

  • diplomat (and politician of all kinds on the highest level in a given country)
  • travel agent
  • language teacher
  • working in communications for any big company (doing business in more than one country)
  • international relationist
  • interpret
  • tourist/travel guide
  • waiter or hotel clerk in a touristic region/city
  • social worker or hospital staff (administrative or nurse in particular) in a multi-ethnic neighborhood...
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qwermab
qwermab
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You can work as a translator but you've got to be really good and know a lot of languages.

Or you can simply add languages to your CV and get more job chances or higher payment.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII
BastouXII
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If you really master them, two languages may be enough for a translator. In Canada, French-English translators are in high demand (and they are also numerous), in the US, I'm guessing English-Spanish ones are also in demand. It depends where you want to work. Europe might require a larger amount of languages, but to master a language to the point of being able to translate them professionally is quite hard, barely fluent is not enough.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vllt
vllt
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You don't need to know a lot of languages to be a translator. Attaining and maintaining a degree of fluency required for translation gets harder with every additional language because it's so time-intensive. The industry standard in Europe is one active language combination (meaning you translate both to and from both languages) and one passive language combination (meaning you only translate from the chosen foreign language into your mother tongue).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcsdlw53

I think the last one is the most useful

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcsdlw53

A list of the 10 most spoken languages

https://www.alsintl.com/blog/most-common-languages/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/otsogutxi
otsogutxi
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To get a start, you could make language learning videos on Youtube. You might earn some money and it's an interesting thing to put on your CV.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/widle
widle
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Apart from teaching and translation, you might consider becoming an interpreter - of course you'd need to know the language(s) very well, but also to be quick and have a good memory.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgstcd
jgstcd
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You should be careful to distinguish between jobs which require a very deep knowledge of two languages and those which require a passable knowledge of several. Translation, for example, is not something I would recommend to anyone who hasn't lived for a number of years in both countries, but you can certainly do it knowing only two languages. A lot of jobs centred around tourism, by contrast, can be done with a much more superficial understanding, but will often require that level in half a dozen languages or more.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brittalexiswm

My career in pharmacy is good for people who speak two or more languages, because medicine is always in demand. Even being a cashier in the pharmacy would be good, because they probably interact with customers the most. Anything medical in areas with several ethnicities is a good career choice, and you will definitely use your languages. This is why I'm doing Duolingo and other language courses

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KansasBurri

The Foreign Service is always looking for people, and learning a language bumps you up on the list of people they accept. The problem is Spanish, French, German, Portugese, Italian and languages like that really don't do much. They give you .25-.5 extra points for that, but being a veteran gives you 4.

But if you know Urdu, Hindi, Russian, Chinese, Pashto, Arabic, Farsi and less commonly known languages they will definitely help.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dlw53

You could be a tranlator of some sort. Or you could be a teacher. Like a polish-English teacher. Maltese Chinese is the most spoken language. Spainish is next.

2 years ago