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"Не переходите дорогу на красный свет."

Translation:Don't cross the road on a red light.

November 11, 2015

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faelys
  • 1694

I don't understand how "на красный свет" works grammatically, would someone help me? Is it a set expression, or на+accusative because of the motion and taken somewhat figuratively, or is it another meaning of на+acc, or something else entirely?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

This is a good question. People that know more than me: is красный свет essentially being considered a time period here, so this is a time accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lis_ali

Yes. На красный/зеленый свет. На время обеда. На неделю. For ex: Я взял книгу на неделю.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

"During a red light", "while a red light is on". Yes, this is a time period, not expressed well by the English phrase "on a red light"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanmenezesjjk

I still would like to know the answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oberoth-SGA

The point is that переходить дорогу на какой-либо свет (красный, жёлтый, зелёный) is an established expression. This is the same expression as in English - cross the road on a red light.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Igor970222

That was my guess too, but it was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chsemyonova

The pronunciation is wrong on the word «переходи́те». The emphasis should be on the «и́», representing the formal/plural imperative, rather than the «о́», which would denote the formal/plural second person present tense (вы перехо́дите). I've reported this issue.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFinkie

I have a feeling that reporting these issues isn't going to result in the problem being fixed, since it's a problem with the TTS, not Duolingo itself. (But do keep reporting anyway.)

I am very grateful to people like you who leave comments warning us of mispronunciations. It is the most helpful thing you can do. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AKS-47

fyi: TTS can be "taught" to put stress/accent in the correct place. There are so many words that are mis-pronounced that even reporting them becomes tedious, not to mention about writing in the forum about each instance


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kyashtyur

More natural to say "on a red light"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morgan1039

Duolingo, for the love of all that is holy, please accept “Don’t cross the street at a red light” as a translation. It’s correct, it’s the most obvious translation for me, and it’s the most natural. I keep getting this wrong and I always report it every time, but it hasn’t been fixed in all this time.

“At a red light” is not only the same thing as “on a red light”, but it sounds better! Please fix this!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MZb86Lqh

I think the Russian expression with на+accusative relates to time, not space, for which "on" is more appropriate than "at". Though I do admit that it would be rather nitpicky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

Do people in Russia cross if it's clear or do they wait for a green light? Here in Britain freedom to jaywalk is regarded as a human right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taffarelbergamin

Last time I visited Moscow, I had more time for walking around the city with my Russian friends and there was a street to cross. Red for pedestrians and no car around. As we naturally do here in Brazil, I proceed to cross (I really don't know if we have this right) but my friend stopped me saying "we always only cross on green. Traffic here is unpredictable". Like... She doesn't cross on red not because it is wrong, but because she is afraid of the traffic... Not sure though if all Russians have this feeling about it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geneven

I was emphatically stopped from crossing streets on red lights in Moscow by twins who saw themselves as my protectors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardoMay5

I got told off loudly by a total stranger in Moscow for crossing on a red light. I must add it was a rare one-way single lane street so I felt no risk whatsoever in doing so.

A substantial amount of Russian cars have cameras installed on their dashboards because a fairly high number of drivers are involved in hit-and-runs there. Therefore i suspect pedestrians don't feel particularly safe in jaywalking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MitjaSaje

Well this is somewhat discussion on cultural habits - in good old Soviet Union everybody was crossing on red light if the street was clear. My experience in Latvia was that Russians were crossing on red and locals strictly waiting for green. Though not Russian my Slavic soul influenced me to go along with my slavic brethren. I am afraid that the situaton became so bad that Russians started to conform...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

We don't even have a word for jaywalking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

I guess it's not really a Russian thing then... :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaramataBG

Human rights won't save you if 2 tones of metal crushes you while you jaywalk on a red signal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

This is true. But I guess we don't have the patience to stand staring at a red light if the 2 tons of metal are nowhere to be seen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrolleJr

I also noticed that Russians were much less prone to cross a red light than my Swedish feet were, and as it seemed, regardless of any fear of traffic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PleasingFungus

The sentence might be directed to drivers :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

Not really, "переходите" is about going on foot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taffarelbergamin

Last time I visited Moscow, I had more time for walking around the city with my Russian friends and there was a street to cross. Red for pedestrians and no car around. As we naturally do here in Brazil, I proceed to cross (I really don't know if we have this right) but my friend stopped me saying "we always only cross on green. Traffic here is unpredictable". Like... She doesn't cross on red not because it is wrong, but because she is afraid of the traffic... Not sure though if all Russians have this feeling about it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitri.M.

Differently for each person. If you feel confident go on. But there are some eventualities like cars rushing at the 100-150 km/h.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattRobins1

In British English surely "at" is acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klaudialk

British English also, and I'd be most likely to say "when the light is red", actually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zombie499410

I'm not a native English speaker, but I've almost certainly never heard "on a red light" before. I thought it was "at a red light"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex10730

Why "the road"? Why "Do not cross a road…" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/problemslike

It's just idiomatic. I guess both should probably be accepted, but the expression is always "cross the road."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fluffy-Dasher

Duolingo teaching us good habits!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiledRizk

переходИте


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac_S2910

Both 'on' and 'at' in translations seem unnatural to me? Maybe its just my dialect but both seem clunky and wrong. Is saying 'don't cross the road when there's a red light' wrong? What about 'don't cross the road during a red light'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

"on a red light" is standard American English. I think it's also standard in the UK, based on other comments. You should get used to it.

Your translation gives the concept of the Russian, but would resulted in a far different sentence if translated back into Russian - starting with the word когда.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiledRizk

The audio is a complete mess here! It pronounces дорОгу as дорогУ, and переходИте as перехОдите!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitri.M.

Не переходИте, the accent must be on the second last syllable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoUU7

In russia I really would only cross if its green and when no car drives near you..the traffic is dangerous


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laith678514

Do anyone knows what's the difference between проходить and переходить?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a22brad22

Про is the prefix for passing. Пере is the prefix for crossing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

"на красный свет" seems to me to be be a somewhat idiomatic usage of на + accusative, somewhat similar to the idea for "for [activity]", e.g., на ужин "for dinner", or related to the idea that на is used when movement is involved - except на usually has a prepositional object for the movement to apply to, and here the "object" of на is a concept (the denial of permission to move) - unless the consideration is one of moving towards the light. (Poltergeist fans????)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul607642

A the interchangeable answershould be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rumata_

can I say 'pass' instead of 'cross'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndroidKanada

Not really. The verb "pass" is more like "пройти мимо".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaVilma305124

Нажмите кнопку, прежде чем сделать это.., press the button before doing it.,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redactedname40

Why not "don't cross a road on the red light"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

There's a bird (a tūī, they're great mimics) living near me which mimics the sound the nearby pedestrian lights make to tell sight-impaired people when the lights change to green. Undoing Duo's road safety advice...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewcmorris

"don't cross the road on a red light" is bad UK english. It is more correct to say "don't cross the road at a red light".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Metu385676

"Do not go across the road" should be accepted.

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