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"Я ухожу в час."

Translation:I am leaving at one o'clock.

2 years ago

70 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cherub721
cherub721
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How would you say I'm leaving in one hour?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kyashtyur
kyashtyur
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Я ухожу через час. "через ___" works for any length of time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ishana92
Ishana92
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And what about I'm leaving in two hours, or N hours?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Я ухожу через N часа/часов.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/killerman64
killerman64
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lol i thought that was a И

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quieh
Quieh
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Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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The mobile version has "o" and "'clock[with the apostrophe here]" as two separate words hahaha! It's technically a contraction of "of clock," so it's one word "o'clock," or at the very least the apostrophe belongs on the "o'," not "clock." :-D I don't know why this made me laugh

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/serbioski
serbioski
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I just find it anoying, specially when i miss one of them in a hurry and get a wrong answer

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kyashtyur
kyashtyur
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*I am leaving at one.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanisaChatte
JanisaChatte
Mod
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Added it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrICEtON

"I am going to leave at one" shoud be accepted I think. Reported.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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There's an intention in your phrase, more like "я собираюсь уйти в час".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrICEtON

Actually that's what I meant. If I say "Я уйду в час" or "Я ухожу в час", isn't it the intention? I don't understand the difference yet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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It is, but there's a slight difference: in this case (я ухожу/я уйду) you are pretty sure you are leaving at one. Я собираюсь уйти = I'm going to leave means you are planning to leave at one but it can change... I hope it helped

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrICEtON

Thank you. I think I've understood.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid
FaizalZahid
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"один" and "час" difference?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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Один = one; час = hour. "В час дня/ночи" is a kind of 'exception', 'cliche' for time mention. Nobody would ever say "В один дня", it would always be "В час дня/ночи". But it works only for 13.00 / 01.00, respectively. For others it is ok to say: в два, в три, в четыре (часа) etc. дня/ночи/утра/вечера

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid
FaizalZahid
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So I was going through the lesson and found out that "час" means "hour" as in "один час". So "Я ухожу в час" literally means "I am leaving at (an/one) hour" since there is no article. At least it seems to me so. :D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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It means I leave at one o'clock and nothing else :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu
VladaFu
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I alwas fall for в час as "in time" (Czech včas).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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Pozor! (Czech) = Watch out! Позор! = Shame on you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Hahaha! That's a great one! What about...

запомнить = to memorize

zapomnieć (Polish) = to forget

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norrius
Norrius
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Russian also has «запамятовать» :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Hahaha! Well, Belarusian is almost Polish anyway!

BTW, the Czech "pozor!" works just fine in a dangerous Russian situation LOL! A driver isn't watching the road and is heading straight toward you! Yell "pozor" at him! He will feel ashamed of himself as he kills you with his car!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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Вóвремя = In time = Včas

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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The pronunciation of the word "ухожу" is wrong. The stress should be on the second "у" "ухожу́"

http://forvo.com/search/ухожу/ru/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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It is, technically correct here. The female voice has a certain regional dialect that makes it sound like the stress is on the second syllable, but it can't be because the "О" is pronounced as unstressed, as a schwa /ə/. If the second syllable were stressed then the "О" would be pronounced /ô/. The woman's voice here sounds a little like a Moscow accent or similar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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The part that I disagree with is the pronunciation of O. In the unstressed syllable that immediately precedes the stressed one (which is the case here) and/or in the opening unstressed syllable that starts with O (e.g. in the word отвечать). it is pronounced as 'u' in "husband", not as a shwa. And the woman is not a moscovite, she must be from the south of Russian or Ukraine. I can tell form the way she doesn't palatalize her m's in семь and восемь, pronounces the second o in сорок as 'u' in 'rucksack' where the standard pronunciation requires a shwa, and from the way she pronounces soft дь and ть close to гь and кь - the deficiency of articulation which I find most hateful (Don't know why - it's a personal thing. As a young boy I would never even consider dating a girl speaking like that).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norrius
Norrius
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As a young boy I would never even consider dating a girl speaking like that

Why, I wouldn't consider dating a robot either.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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I agree, you're right. It is not an /ə/. It's an /ʌ/. She pronounces it /u-'xʌ-ʒu/, but it should be /u-xə-'ʒu/.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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In a syllable immediately preceding the stressed one the letters а and о are always pronounced as /ʌ/. They are pronounced as /ə/ only in other unstressed syllables, unless they are the first letter of the word, in which case they stand for /ʌ/ sound. So it should be /u-xʌ-'ʒu/, whereas she says u-'xа-ʒu/.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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For me it sounds ok:). You're right, it seems like Moscow accent where an unstressed "o" often sounds as [a]: [ухажý]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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The mistake is not in the sound here, but in the accent on the second syllable. The female voice says: "Я ухо́жу".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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No, it's more like /u-'xʌ-žu/ (lacking a Russian letter to represent the sound) than "ухóжу" /u-'xô-žu/. I understand what you're saying, but it sounds OK to Russian ears. It's more of an inflection in this woman's own speech than an accent on the wrong syllable. Again, the wrong syllable in this case would have been pronounced with /ô/.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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It isn't just Moscow accent - it's the standard Russian pronunciatiion found all over the country except some rural areas around Vologda, Vladimir, Nizhniy Novgorod and Ulyanovsk where o is pronounced /ô/ not only in the stressed syllable, but also in the unstressed one that precedes it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rozamunduszek

"I am going at one" not ok?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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It means "я иду в час" (somewhere)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Actually it is a correct translation, although it's too colloquial for learners of English or Russian.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gulpepper
Gulpepper
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Yeah, it lacks any useful details for learning

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaroldWonh
HaroldWonh
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It is impossible to hear the "v" - to me there is just a silence. How can I spell a silence?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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It is pronounced as an "F." Ya uhazhu fchas

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hebz69

I have never heard of "ухожу" but I am guessing it is the same as "уехал" or will they mean differently?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Ухожу means that I'm leaving on foot. Уехал means left from somewhere by car, bicycle, train, horse and carriage, skateboard, etc.

;-P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Уехать: Я уезжаю, Я уехал. Уходить: Я ухожу, Я ушёл.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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Ухожу is the present form of the verb уходить, уехал is the past form of the verb уехать.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Я уезжаю, Я уехал.

Я ухожу, Я ушёл.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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Of course! Now I fixed it. Thanks for that!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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My pleasure. Forgive me if I sounded harsh.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UrbanBrawl

How would you say "I am leaving within an hour", should one use через here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey
Dr.Fandey
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Nope, it would be "я уйду в течение часа". The preposition через doesn't work here.

BTW, don't mix up the complex preposition "в течение" (= during, within) with the combination of noun+preposition "в течении..." = in the flow (в течении реки, for instance, = in the flow of a river). Even many Russian natives are confused with it but still, it's a mistake.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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I am leaving in an hour = Я ухожу/уезжаю/выезжаю через час.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roee304923

So it's present because of хожу and if I wanna say I will live I should write уиду to make it perfective and hence future?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Yes, ухожу is present tense "am leaving," and уйду is future tense "I'll leave."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janis_lmao
Janis_lmao
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I got this wrong because i thought there could only be "i am leaving in an hour"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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Read my comment of 8 months ago.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexroseajr

It rejects "I go at 1", but that colloquially means the exact same thing, even though "go" reads as present, the subtext is clearly future tense.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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"leave" would be a better translation than "go"--too ambiguous. But I agree the general meaning is correct. "I go at 1:00," more accurately Я иду в час

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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"Я иду" means "I'm coming/going/walking" but does not collocate with words or phrases indicating the time. Time indicators require using one of the verbs "прихожу", "ухожу", "выхожу", "приезжаю", "выезжаю", "прилетаю", "вылетаю", "прибываю", "отбываю", "приплываю" , "отплываю".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Thanks for the clarification. I grew up hearing it spoken that way, so it must be colloquial and incorrect. For example, Когда ты идёшь к врачу? --Я иду в час.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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The problem is that the question "Когда ты идёшь к врачу?" does not make it clear whether you mean to say, "When is your appointment with the doctor?" or "What time are you leaving to go and see the doctor?" "иду" implies "I'm on my way" rather than "I am leaving" ( "выхожу", "выезжаю").

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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I never said that иду means "leaving." It's just "going," completely ambiguous. My parents spoke with the colloquialisms of their day, probably not grammatically correct, or maybe living in America influenced their Russian

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GervasioRa2

Why no 'Я иду'?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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According to @Dmitry_Arch above, the verb идти is an imperfective verb and cannot be used with specified time.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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Being imperfective has nothing to do with it. All the verbs I mentioned are imperfective.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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my mistake. I confused prefixes on the verbs as changing their aspect. Thanks for the correction.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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Revise Russian grammar, Vadim. The verbs are imperfective. Their perfective counterparts are пойду, выйду, выеду etc.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chatulov
Chatulov
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Is there differens if I want to say: I leave in time?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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"I leave on time," is correct English, but that translates as Я ухожу вовремя.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johncummin7
johncummin7
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Since its ухожу instead of уйду, does this sentence imply that you typically leave from some place at 1? Like "when do you leave from your class?" Я ухожу в час (каждый день, по вторникам, обычно, и тому подобное)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Yes, it works like that in your context. But it can also be a one time thing, like "when are you leaving class today?" - Я ухожу в час.

3 months ago