"Я ухожу в час."

Translation:I am leaving at one o'clock.

November 11, 2015

93 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cherub721

How would you say I'm leaving in one hour?

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kyashtyur

Я ухожу через час. "через ___" works for any length of time.

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ishana92

And what about I'm leaving in two hours, or N hours?

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Я ухожу через N часа/часов.

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/killerman64

lol i thought that was a И

April 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Quieh

Thanks

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

The mobile version has "o" and "'clock[with the apostrophe here]" as two separate words hahaha! It's technically a contraction of "of clock," so it's one word "o'clock," or at the very least the apostrophe belongs on the "o'," not "clock." :-D I don't know why this made me laugh

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/serbioski

I just find it anoying, specially when i miss one of them in a hurry and get a wrong answer

April 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kyashtyur

*I am leaving at one.

November 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JanisaChatte

Added it.

November 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu

I alwas fall for в час as "in time" (Czech včas).

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

Pozor! (Czech) = Watch out! Позор! = Shame on you!

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Hahaha! That's a great one! What about...

запомнить = to memorize

zapomnieć (Polish) = to forget

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Norrius

Russian also has «запамятовать» :)

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

I'm pretty sure that's Belarusian not Russian.

BTW, the Czech "pozor!" works just fine in a dangerous Russian situation. A driver isn't watching the road and is heading straight toward you! Yell "pozor" at him! He will feel ashamed of himself as he kills you with his car!

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rajstrok

My forever favourite would be: po'nos/по'нос (BCSM) - pride понос' (Russian) - diarrhea

April 24, 2019, 8:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian "ponos," also Serbian "понос," but isn't Macedonian "гордост"? (Which is very similar to the Russian гордость for "pride")

April 24, 2019, 8:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

The M in BCMS is Montenegrin, I believe, not Macedonian.

April 24, 2019, 9:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Oh! Great point! My mistake.

April 24, 2019, 9:13 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey

Вóвремя = In time = Včas

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KrICEtON

"I am going to leave at one" shoud be accepted I think. Reported.

January 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey

There's an intention in your phrase, more like "я собираюсь уйти в час".

February 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KrICEtON

Actually that's what I meant. If I say "Я уйду в час" or "Я ухожу в час", isn't it the intention? I don't understand the difference yet.

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey

It is, but there's a slight difference: in this case (я ухожу/я уйду) you are pretty sure you are leaving at one. Я собираюсь уйти = I'm going to leave means you are planning to leave at one but it can change... I hope it helped

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KrICEtON

Thank you. I think I've understood.

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg

The pronunciation of the word "ухожу" is wrong. The stress should be on the second "у" "ухожу́"

http://forvo.com/search/ухожу/ru/

May 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

It sounds correct to me.

December 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid

"один" and "час" difference?

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey

Один = one; час = hour. "В час дня/ночи" is a kind of 'exception', 'cliche' for time mention. Nobody would ever say "В один дня", it would always be "В час дня/ночи". But it works only for 13.00 / 01.00, respectively. For others it is ok to say: в два, в три, в четыре (часа) etc. дня/ночи/утра/вечера

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid

So I was going through the lesson and found out that "час" means "hour" as in "один час". So "Я ухожу в час" literally means "I am leaving at (an/one) hour" since there is no article. At least it seems to me so. :D

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey

It means I leave at one o'clock and nothing else :)

November 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877

It can only mean "one", because час is in nominative case, and the only number that takes nominative modifiers is "one".

December 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/UrbanBrawl

How would you say "I am leaving within an hour", should one use через here?

November 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey

Nope, it would be "я уйду в течение часа". The preposition через doesn't work here.

BTW, don't mix up the complex preposition "в течение" (= during, within) with the combination of noun+preposition "в течении..." = in the flow (в течении реки, for instance, = in the flow of a river). Even many Russian natives are confused with it but still, it's a mistake.

November 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

I am leaving in an hour = Я ухожу/уезжаю/выезжаю через час.

November 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Я должен с тобой поспорить насчёт звук /ʌ/ в русском языке. Это акцентированный гласный. Русские не могут произносить английские слова, punk, cup, double, what, muscle правильно. Получаются панк, кап, дабл, уат, масл, и т.д. Это потому-что в русском языке, когда слог с буквой О идёт перед слогом с ударом, произносится /ɐ/. А /ʌ/ в английском языке это в слогах с ударом. По-моему этого звука вообще нет в русском языке, так как русские не могут это произносить.

Москва /mɐsk-'va/ не /mʌsk-'va/

опять /ɐ-'pʲatʲ/ не /ʌ-'pʲatʲ/.

thunder /'θʌn-dər/

trouble /'trʌ-bəl/

December 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

The upside down “a” and the upside down “v” are two signs of phonetic alphabet that stand for the same sound. The only difference between them is that the former is never stressed, whereas the latter is always stressed. When I studied Russian phonetics at school and in the university, we used the upside down “v” sign in transcription for the the first degree reduction of /a/ and /o/ vowels, which occurs in the syllable preceding the stressed one. As for the upside down /a/, I had never come across that sign until you mentioned it.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

"again" and "cup" are not the same sound. Russians can't pronounce "cup" properly, meaning that this vowel doesn't exist in Russian. All the YouTube Russian teachers teach ɐ for опять, Москва, etc. Maybe this has changed since you were at the university, just like щ has changed from the older official Russian language books that used to teach "shch"

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

Vadim, I appreciate you can hear the pronunciation difference between LA Russians and American natives, but you are not a linguist and you don’t see things right. The people from the LA Russian community pronounce “cup” as /kap/ because they don’t care to imitate natives (that reminds me of this funny guy who calls himself “a Russian dad” or something like that - you know who I am talking about: he is viral on YouTube) or because nobody pointed out the difference to them, not because they are not capable of saying “cup” properly. You can’t generalize like that about all Russians as lots of people have a good ear and saying “cup” the way natives say it presents no challenge to a Russian. It is obvious to anybody who has taken a basic course in Russian phonetics or simply has a good ear that the first two syllables in молоко have different vowels - just like the first two syllables in полотенце. Мол- in молоко sounds exactly like -mal in “decimal” and пол- in полотенце - exactly like -ple in “maple” - the vowel in both cases is a shwa which is denoted by the upside down “e” sign. For the second syllable in both words you may use either the upside down a or the upside down v sign - it is only a matter of convention, the latter being nothing but the unstressed variety of the former (i.e., provided that the speaker is not from Kirov (the Viatka valley) area where shwa is used in all unstressed syllables preceding the stressed one). To me Москва sounds like “musk-vah” coming from an American, and капкан may be pronounced as cup-cun or cup-kahn, but, in either case, the first syllable of the word will be identical to “cup”.

January 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

Lots of people speak with an accent and quite a few make fun of others’ accents. But all that is none of DL’s concern. What matters is that as native Russian speakers we must not confuse learners of our language by giving them wrong information. And, to my knowledge, the overwhelming majority of Americans are not familiar with the International Phonetic Alphabet anyway.

January 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

I never said that the first syllable of “again” and “cup” have the same vowel sound. In fact, “again” starts with the same vowel as the one that we hear in the first syllable of «молоко». The vowel in “cup” is found in the second syllable of «молоко». As a matter of fact, the word “cup” is identical to the first syllable of «капкан» (a kind of trap made of metal, which is used by poaches). So Russians have no problem pronouncing “cup”. Saying “cop”, though, the way Americans say it presents a real challenge to a Russian as the vowel in “cop” doesn’t exist in Russian language. Моск- in Москва sounds identical to “musk”, so I don’t see any point in using two different symbols for basically the same vowel. As for щ, we have never been taught to transcribe it as /шч/, but only as /ш’ш’/. The old Russian language books that you’ve mentioned are based on a misconception of the early 20th century.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

I live in L.A. in the Russian community. I am surrounded by Russian speaking people. My family, friends, business associates in my industry, and entire social nightlife scene is in the Russian community. I have very few American friends. For you to say Russians have no problem saying "cup" or any other word with the short U in it, shows that you are unaware of the Russian accent. It's common knowledge that saying "F.U." with a Russian accent is /fak/, /kap/, "having /fan/," "throwing away /dʒank/," etc. That's just a fact, nothing to argue about. Obviously the longer a Russian immigrant has lived in America, the lesser the Russian accent becomes. But even then, my parents have been here 39 years and still mispronounce the short U like /a/ which is a very common thing. Why? Because there is no /ʌ/ in /mɐ-lɐ-'ko/, /mɐsk-'va/, or /pɐ-lɐ-'tʲɛn-tsə/.

If they could train their brain on капкан, then they would say "cup" properly because you are correct -the pronunciation can be either /'kʌp-'kan/ (double-accented sounds correct also) or /kɐp-'kan/ (accent on the second)

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

I never said that Russian can't say /ʌ/. They can if they want to. But certain things in any accent are standard, and not pronouncing "❤❤❤❤" right is a very common thing. Not just L.A. When I watch any Russian speaking English worldwide, on the Internet, that is a common aspect of a Russian accent. And CrazyRussianDad by the way, puts on the fake exaggerated Russian accent. He doesn't really talk that way.

January 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/rozamunduszek

"I am going at one" not ok?

January 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey

It means "я иду в час" (somewhere)

February 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Actually it is a correct translation, although it's too colloquial for learners of English or Russian.

March 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gulpepper

Yeah, it lacks any useful details for learning

June 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/HaroldWonh

It is impossible to hear the "v" - to me there is just a silence. How can I spell a silence?

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

It is pronounced as an "F." Ya uhazhu fchas

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877

I hear it more like an addition to the end of ухожу - "uhazhuf chas". That seems to happen a lot - it seems unavoidable when speaking at normal speed. And sometimes it sounds like a "v" rather than an "f" tacked on to a word ending in a vowel sound, or to be beginning of a word starting with a vowel sound.

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Hebz69

I have never heard of "ухожу" but I am guessing it is the same as "уехал" or will they mean differently?

May 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Ухожу means that I'm leaving on foot. Уехал means left from somewhere by car, bicycle, train, horse and carriage, skateboard, etc.

;-P

May 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Уехать: Я уезжаю, Я уехал. Уходить: Я ухожу, Я ушёл.

May 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Fandey

Ухожу is the present form of the verb уходить, уехал is the past form of the verb уехать.

May 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Roee304923

So it's present because of хожу and if I wanna say I will live I should write уиду to make it perfective and hence future?

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Yes, ухожу is present tense "am leaving," and уйду is future tense "I'll leave."

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Janis_lmao

I got this wrong because i thought there could only be "i am leaving in an hour"

July 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

Read my comment of 8 months ago.

July 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexroseajr

It rejects "I go at 1", but that colloquially means the exact same thing, even though "go" reads as present, the subtext is clearly future tense.

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

"leave" would be a better translation than "go"--too ambiguous. But I agree the general meaning is correct. "I go at 1:00," more accurately Я иду в час

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

"Я иду" means "I'm coming/going/walking" but does not collocate with words or phrases indicating the time. Time indicators require using one of the verbs "прихожу", "ухожу", "выхожу", "приезжаю", "выезжаю", "прилетаю", "вылетаю", "прибываю", "отбываю", "приплываю" , "отплываю".

October 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Thanks for the clarification. I grew up hearing it spoken that way, so it must be colloquial and incorrect. For example, Когда ты идёшь к врачу? --Я иду в час.

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

The problem is that the question "Когда ты идёшь к врачу?" does not make it clear whether you mean to say, "When is your appointment with the doctor?" or "What time are you leaving to go and see the doctor?" "иду" implies "I'm on my way" rather than "I am leaving" ( "выхожу", "выезжаю").

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

I never said that иду means "leaving." It's just "going," completely ambiguous. My parents spoke with the colloquialisms of their day, probably not grammatically correct, or maybe living in America influenced their Russian

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GervasioRa2

Why no 'Я иду'?

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

According to @Dmitry_Arch above, the verb идти is an imperfective verb and cannot be used with specified time.

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

Being imperfective has nothing to do with it. All the verbs I mentioned are imperfective.

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

my mistake. I confused prefixes on the verbs as changing their aspect. Thanks for the correction.

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

Revise Russian grammar, Vadim. The verbs are imperfective. Their perfective counterparts are пойду, выйду, выеду etc.

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Chatulov

Is there differens if I want to say: I leave in time?

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

"I leave on time," is correct English, but that translates as Я ухожу вовремя.

November 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/johncummin7

Since its ухожу instead of уйду, does this sentence imply that you typically leave from some place at 1? Like "when do you leave from your class?" Я ухожу в час (каждый день, по вторникам, обычно, и тому подобное)

June 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Yes, it works like that in your context. But it can also be a one time thing, like "when are you leaving class today?" - Я ухожу в час.

June 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sponz54

The first time уходить is used.

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Gerrard_SpM

Why this sentence means i am leaving at one o clock not for ex i am leaving at time

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch

Although in old Russian the word час used to mean “time” ( it still has this meaning in Ukrainian and Belorussian as well as Czech, Slovak (čas) and Polish (czas)), in modern Russian it only means (1) “hour” or (2) “one o’clock”. By the way, “at time” doesn’t exist. “At the time of ...” = «во время ...», “at a time” = «за [один] раз».

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

I think he meant "on time" вовремя.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ULRICHSCHL4

This is one of the cases where the speaker is irritating me. With all repititions - but he pronounces "х" like "к".

February 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JudoRandori

"I am leaving at one hour" is not a sentence any English speaker would ever consider constructing. This is easily the most ridiculous "correct" answer I have thus far encountered.

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

I don't see that as a correct answer in my Duolingo. I see, "I am leaving at one o'clock," as the correct answer.

July 28, 2017
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